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Michael Locke Deasy/Penner & Partners

Treasures of Los Angeles Architecture


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For our readers with an appreciation for architecture, Los Angeles is a treasure trove, however due to its vast size (469 sq. miles!) it could take a lifetime to explore! (There are, in fact, over 1000 officially-designated historic-cultural monuments in Los Angeles in addition to the many architectural wonders that have no official designation).

It is my pleasure to share my personal discoveries with you, our readers. Many of the images shown here are well-recognized, however, I hope that you will "something new'" every time you return for a visit.

Pictured is the Sturges House designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in 1939


  • Zimmerman House, Craig Ellwood 1950
    Carmelina Avenue in the Brentwood Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles has an unusual number of architecturally-significant homes. The Zimmerman House designed by architect Craig Elwood is one of the best.

    Located at 400 North Carmelina Avenue. Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • Ziegler Estate, Charles Hornbeck & Alfred P. Wilson, Architects 1904
    The Zeigler Estate located in historic Highland Park combines Queen Anne, Craftsman and Shingle Style into an elegant statement. The mansion has 6 bedrooms and four baths and features an arroyo stone wall. It is situated in the historic core of Highland Park next door to Casa de Adobe.

    The estate is located at 4601 North Figueroa Street. It was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1989 (No. 416).
  • Yoakum House, 1895-1915
    Tudor Revival style house built by volunteer labor for Finis Ewing Yoakum, founder of 'Pisgah House', a halfway home. Located at 140 S. Avenue 46 in the Highland Park neihborhood of Los Angeles.

    Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1985 (No. 287).
  • Yang House, Ronald G. Firestone, Architect 1998
    Architect Ronald G. Firestone designed the opulent Italianate style house for Joon Nam and Christina Yang in 1998. The Yang House is located at 325 South Hudson Avenue in the exclusive Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Wrigley Mansion 'Tournament House', G. Lawrence Stimson, Architect 1906-1914







    Owned by chewing-gum magnate William Wrigley and built between the years 1906-1914, the Wrigley Mansion was given to the City of Pasadena in 1958, upon Mrs. Wrigley's death, with the stipulation that it be used as the headquarters for the Pasadena Tournament of Roses Association. The house is magnificently situated at 391 S. Orange Grove Blvd. and includes the Wrigley Gardens, with 4.5 acres of roses representing 1,500 varieties.
  • Wrigley Mansion 'Tournament House' G. Lawrence Stimson, Architect 1906-1914








    Donna and I were fortunate to tour the mansion on February 24, 2011, along with other members and friends from the First Congregational Church of Los Angeles. The formal dining room shown here is one of the home's most beautiful public rooms; with rich paneling and an ornate molded plaster ceiling. The portrait on the left wall is of one of the early Tournament of Roses queens. After the passing of Mrs. Wrigley in 1958 the mansion and the land surrounding the home were donated to the city of Pasadena with the stipulation that they would be used as the Tournament of Roses Headquarters.

    Free public tours of Tournament House, located at 391 S. Orange Grove Boulevard, are offered every Thursday, 2 – 4 pm between the months of February and August.

    Among the highlights of the tour you see a one-of-a-kind Waterford rose bowl which was specially crafted for the centennial celebration of the Tournament of Roses. Also on display are the crowns and tiaras worn by former Rose Queens and Princesses as well as Rose Bowl related trophies and Rose Bowl Hall of Fame portraits.

  • Wright-Mooers House c.1880
    The Wright-Mooers House is representative of the 'West Coast Victorian', an eclectic blend of Queen Anne Victorian with other styles, Note the small pairs of Romanesque columns and the elongated domed roof, perhaps a touch of the Islamic. The house was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1967 (No. 45). The Located at 818 S. Bonnie Brae Street in the Westlake neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Worrel House, Robert B. Stacy-Judd 1926
    Pueblo-Mayan Revival style residence designed by architect Robert Stacy-Judd (1884–1975) in 1926. The English architect typically synthesized art deco with Mayan and Aztec influences in his work. He is best known for the design of the landmark Aztec Hotel in Monrovia, California completed in the same year. Located at 710 Adelide Drive in Santa Monica, Califronia.
  • Worley House, Alfred Priest c.1923
    English Tudor Revival style residence designed by noted Glendale architect Alfred Priest in 1923. The architect also designed numerous notable homes and buildings in Glendale, including the Security Trust and Savings Bank located at 10 N. Brand Boulevard.

    The Worley House was added to the Glendale Register of Historic Resources (No. 54) in 2005. Located at 1560 Grandview Avenue.
  • Woodcraft Manor, John C. Austin 1901
    Sprawling Victorian Craftsman mansion designed by architect John C. Austin c.1901. Located in the historic West Adams neighborhood of Los Angeles at 2111 Park Grove Avenue.
  • Woodbury House, Harry Ridgeway 1898
    It's a pity I wasn't able to capture a better photo of the Woodbury-Story House which is unfortunately in a state of decay. The home was built in 1882 for Capt. Woodbury, one of the founders of Altadena, and his wife Martha. Architect Frederick L. Roehrig was hired to design a ballroom for the house in 1898. Originally the property was a ranch that included a citrus grove and vineyards as well as a two-story bunkhouse for the staff.

    Captain Woodbury was responsible for planting the deodar trees that line nearby Santa Rosa Avenue, also known as Christmas Tree Lane. The house has been designed in a style that combines both Italianate and Colonial Revival elements and has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places. The home became the property of Hampton L. Story in 1894. After Story's death the home became a coffee shop, sheriff's station, a fire engine house, office building and a tea house.

    Located at 2606 North Madison Avenue in the foothill community of Altadena, California. (The house is partially hidden from view at the end of a cul-de-sac).

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.

  • Woo House, Young Woo 1968
    Architect Young Woo designed the house for himself in 1968. The house was published in the Architectural Record and awarded the magazine's 'Award of Excellence for Home Design' as 'one of the most significant houses of 1967.' The three-bedroom, three-bathroom house is mostly in original condition with new flooring and an updated kitchen. The house is situated on a wooded quarter-acre lot and features decks and patios, a separate studio, clerestory windows and walls of glass which contribute to the light-filled, airy interiors.

    The house is currently (July 2013) on the market and listed for sale for $960,000. Located at 3763 Mayfair Drive in the Mt. Washington neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Wolff-Fifield House c.1929
    The English Tudor Revival style house was the home of Ralph Wolff, a pioneer financier of Los Angeles and later, the Reverend Dr. James Fifield, Pastor of the First Congregational Church of Los Angeles. Dr. Fifield's ministry at the church was extraordinary. Taking over the leadership of the church in the midst of the Great Depression, he inherited a discouraged albeit large membership of about 1000 parishioners saddled with a debt of three quarters of a million dollars. His genius for leadership is illustrated by the fact that 'he undertook the task and in less than eight years the church was completely debt-free and had become the largest Congregational Church in the world with over 5,000 members and 21,000 parishioners.' (1).

    The Wof-Fifield House is located at 111 North June Street in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. The house was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No.619) in 1996.

    (1) 'Light on a Gothic Tower' by Royal G. Davis 1967
  • Wolf's Lair, Milton Wolf, Designer 1927

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    Historic castle-chateau located at the end of the hiking trail which runs alongside the Castillo del Lago at the foot of Lake Hollywood. Designed by Developer and Art Director Milton Wolf, it has been the residence of both Efrem Zimbalist, Jr. and Doris Day and was featured in the film, 'Return from Witch Mountain', starring Bette Davis. The fairy-tale fortress with its crenellated walls, turrets and towers gained a local reputation as being haunted after Wolf died at the dining room table.

    The property became available for purchase (listing price: $7,500,000) in June 2008. According to the listing information, the showcase property offers 'an enormous 3.5 acre promontory (14 separate parcels) 8 bedrooms and six bathrooms, a heart -shaped pool and waterfall, pool house/cabana, a guest house designed by Architect John Lautner, helipad and a 1920's speakeasy.' After going through several unsuccessful listings, the property was finally sold in 2010 to DJ-Singer-Songwriter Moby for $3,925,000.

    Wolf's Lair is located at 2869 Durand Drive in the Hollywood Hills.
  • Woit House, Jno H. Fleming, Architect 1934
    Architect Jno H. Fleming designed the English Tudor Revival style house for Charles S. Woit in 1934. Located at 3607 Shannon Road in the Los Feliz district of Los Angeles. The architect also designed the Spanish Revival style Lee Holtz Residence on Amesbury Road (1935) .
  • Wirin House, Richard Neutra, Architect 1950
    Located directly across the street from the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Ennis House in Los Feliz, the Wirin House was purchased by celebrity photographer Mark Seliger in 2004. An extensive restoration under the direction of Architect Sharon Johnston-Lee was completed in 2008.

    The Wirin House is located at 2622 Glendower Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 2005 (No. 812)
  • Wiltern Theater (Pellissier Building) Morgan, Walls & Clements, Architects 1930-31
    The Pelliser Office Building and Wiltern Theater(formerly the Warner Brothers Western Theater) is among the most recognizable and loved landmarks in the City of the Angels. Located along the Wilshire Boulevard Corridor, The exterior is completely covered with blue-green glazed terra cotta tiles in a style referred to as French Zigzag Moderne. The original ornate interior of the theater was designed by G. Albert Lansburgh, and restored by Brenda Levin Associates in 1985.

    Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1973 (No. 118). The Theater is located at 3780 Wilshire Boulevard (corner of Western Avenue).
  • Wilshire Ward Chapel, Harold W. Burton, Architect, 1928
    Harold W. Burton was the most prolific architect of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. In addition to the Wilshire Ward Chapel, Burton also had a hand in designing the Alberta (Canada) Temple,
    the Salt Lake City First Ward Chapel, the Montpelier (Idaho) Tabernacle (all with Hyrum C. Pope) and the Oahu Stake Tabernacle in Honolulu. The outstanding feature of the church is the octagonal tower in a Moderne/Art Deco motif.

    The Wilshire Ward Chapel is located at 1209 Manhattan Place. It was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1991. (No. 531)
  • Wilshire Vermont Station- Arquitectonica Architects 2007
    Miami firm Arquitectonica designed this eye-catching complex, sitting atop the Metro subway station in the heart of Koreatown. Located at the intersection of Vermont St. and Wilshire Blvd., the station is highlighted by a gigantic (8200 square foot) image by artist April Greiman. The complex held its grand opening on October 7, 2007.
  • Wilshire United Methodist Church, Allison & Allison and Austin Whittlesey, Architects 1924








    The architects, James and David Allison’s combined Romanesque and Gothic elements in the design of the church. The tower and facade were inspired by th La Giralda in Sevilla, Spain as well as the For the façade and 140-foot tower, the team was inspired by Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi in Brescia, Italy. and the La Giralda in Sevilla, Spain.

    The architects were among the most important architects in Los Angeles during the first half of the 20th Century.Their accomplishments include the following Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monuments: 13th Church of Christ, Scientist (No. 559), the Irving Branch Library (No. 307), and the Southern California Edison Building (No. 347). They’re also designed many important buildings at UCLA, the Beverly Hills Post Office, and high schools in Burbank, Palo Alto, and Santa Monica.

    Singer Jeanette MacDonald married Gene Raymond at the church in 1937. At the wedding, Nelson Eddy sang, Basil Rathbone and Harold Lloyd were ushers, and Fay Wray and Ginger Rogers were maids of honor. In September 1945, John Agar married Shirley Temple at the church. She was seventeen.

    The church was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1973 (No. 114). Located at 4350 Wilshire Blvd. in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.



  • Wilshire Ebell Theater & Club,, Sumner Hunt & Silas R. Burns, Architects 1924-27








    Neoclassical in style, the Wilshire Ebell Theater and Club was designed by Sumner P. Hunt and Silas R. Burns in 1927. The Ebell of Los Angeles was founded as a non-profie woman's organization in 1894, and is one of the oldest and largest in the nation. Designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1982 (No. 250). Located at 4400 Wilshire Boulevard in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Wilshire Blvd. Temple, A.M Edelman, S. Tilden Norton & D.C. Allison, Architects 1922-29
    The Wilshire Boulevard Temple reminds me of my own and only trip to Istanbul and visiting the Haga Sofia and other great churches and temples of Byzantium. Massive and mysterious, the interior is opulent with black marble, inlaid gold, rich mosaics, rare woods and exquisite murals depicting the history of the Hebrews (by Hugo Ballin).

    The temple is located at 3663 Wilshire Blvd. (at the corner of Hobart Boulevard). It has been declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles (No. 116) and is also on the National Register of Historic Places.
  • William R. Staats House, Marston, Van Pelt & Maybury, 1924
    French Provincial Revival style house designed for William Staats, by the distinguished firm Marston, Van Pelt and Maybury in 1924. Staats arrived in Pasadena in 1887, establishing what would become a well-connected real estate firm. Henry Huntington hand-picked him to subdivide and sell the exclusive Oak Knoll area. Located at 293 S. Grand Avenue in Pasadena, California.

    NOTE: The house is much larger than it appears in the photo; a walk around the corner reveals the true size of the house.
  • William Mulholland Memorial Fountain, Walter S. Clayberg, Designer, 1940

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    William Mulholland was a 'penniless Irish immigrant' and a self-taught engineer who became head of the Los Angeles Bureau of Water Works & Supply at a time when business and civic leaders in Los Angeles were realizing that development would remain limited without additional water resources. Mulholland, with the support of another visionary, Fred Eaton, implemented a plan to redirect water from the Owens Valley on the eastern slopes of the Sierras. The result of their efforts, the California Aqueduct, is one of the great engineering wonders of the world. Employing 5000 workers and 6000 mules, the 238- mile long aqueduct was completed under budget in record time.

    Mulholland, the poor immigrant who lived for a time in a one-room wooden shack near the present-day fountain died in 1935. The fountain dedicated to him was completed in 1940. Approximately 3,000 people attended the dedication ceremony on August 1, 1940. A memorial plaque at the foot of the fountain reads, 'To William Mulholland (1855-1935): A Penniless Irish Immigrant Boy who Rose by the Force of his Industry, Intelligence, Integrity and Intrepidity to be a Sturdy American Citizen, a Self-Educated Engineering Genius, a Whole-Hearted Humanitarian, The Father of this City's Water System, and the Builder of the Los Angeles Aqueduct. This Memorial is Gratefully Dedicated to those who are the Recipients of His Unselfish Bounty and the Beneficiaries of His Prophetic Vision.'

    The Mulholland Fountain is located at the Intersection of Riverside Drive and Los Feliz Blvd. in Los Feliz. It was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1976 (No. 162).
  • William Mead House, Hudson & Munsell Architects 1914
    The William Mead House was the first house in the Vermont Canyon built in 1914. I have yearned to have a peak at it, hidden behind massive ceremonial gates, since moving back to the neighborhood in 2007. My curiosity was satisfied this week as the house came on the market for the first time in twenty eight years. The historic home was the residence of William Mead who founded the Los Feliz Improvement Association in 1913. Described in the Los Feliz Improvement Association Historical Survey c.2000 as a 'Prairie' influenced-style, the house was designed by the eminent architectural firm Hudson & Munsell. Mead purchased 400 acres adjoining Griffith Park in 1911 from Col. Griffith J. Griffith and began planning what would become one of the City's most beautiful subdivisions. He added another 132 acres to his holdings in 1925. For a period of time, Mead owned the entire neighborhood above Los Feliz Boulevard, from Western Avenue to the Los Angeles River. A Los Angeles Times article reported on June 2, 1912 that 'Mr. Mead plans to build a dwelling of palatial proportions by his architects Hudson & Munsell; the design will incline towards the English mansion types, although no style will be slavishly adhered to, the architects having aimed primarily at harmonizing the structure with its unusually attractive and picturesque surroundings'.
    By 1925, ownership of the house passed to David Hamburger, President of the Hamburger and Sons Department Store (which later became the May Company) founded by his father in 1881. The house became the site of many elegant social gatherings during the Hamburgers ownership. After Mr. Hamburger's death in April 1945, the property passed briefly to Harold and Lucile De Armand before Frederick and Muriel Cockerham gained ownership seven months later. Mr. Cockerham, who went by the professional name of Charles Fredericks was a singer and member of the Screen Actors Guild. Between 1954 and 1965 he appeared in many motion pictures including 'To Kill a Mockingbird', 'Tender is the Night', 'My Fair Lady', and 'The Great Race'. In 1949, the house was severely damaged in a fire in which eighteen of the rooms were destroyed.
    The historic house is currently on the market and listed for sale for $4,988,000. The main house has six bedrooms and seven baths in 9,707 sq. ft. in addition to a guest house, staff quarters, swimming pool with pavilion, Koi pond and garden paths meandering throughout the property of over 87,000 square feet. The current owner, Nimit Vongchinsri has been the owner of the house since 1984. The house is decorated in an opulent palatial style, outfitted with rare hardwoods and hand-painted ceilings.
  • William Mead House, Hudson & Munsell Architects 1914
    Described in the Los Feliz Improvement Association Historical Survey c.2000 as a 'Prairie' influenced-style, the house was designed by the eminent architectural firm Hudson & Munsell for William Mead, a pioneer real estate developer in Los Feliz. Mead purchased 400 acres adjoining Griffith Park in 1911 from Col. Griffith J. Griffith and began planning what would become one of the City's most beautiful subdivisions. He added another 132 acres to his holdings in 1925. For a period of time, Mead owned the entire neighborhood above Los Feliz Boulevard, from Western Avenue to the Los Angeles River. A Los Angeles Times article reported on June 2, 1912 that 'Mr. Mead plans to build a dwelling of palatial proportions by his architects Hudson & Munsell; the design will incline towards the English mansion types, although no style will be slavishly adhered to, the architects having aimed primarily at harmonizing the structure with its unusually attractive and picturesque surroundings'.

    By 1925, ownership of the house passed to David Hamburger, President of the Hamburger and Sons Department Store which had been founded by his father in 1881. The house became the site of many elegant social gatherings during the Hamburgers ownership. After Mr. Hamburger's death in April 1945, the property passed briefly to Harold and Lucile De Armand before Frederick and Muriel Cockerham gained ownership seven months later. Mr. Cockerham, who went by the professional name of Charles Fredericks was a singer and member of the Screen Actor's Guild. Between 1954 and 1965 he appeared in many motion pictures including 'To Kill a Mockingbird', 'Tender is the Night', 'My Fair Lady', and 'The Great Race'. In 1949, the house was severely damaged in a fire in which eighteen of the rooms were destroyed.

    The historic house is currently on the market and listed for sale for $4,988,000. The main house has six bedrooms and seven baths in 9,707 sq. ft. in addition to a guest house, staff quarters, swimming pool with pavilion, Koi pond and garden paths meandering throughout the property of over 87,000 square feet. The current owner, Nimit Vongchinsri has decorated it in an opulent European style that is a sight to behold. Located at 4533 Cockerham Drive in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • William J. Dodd Residence, William J. Dodd 1928
    Spanish Colonial Revival style residence designed by architect William J. Dodd in 1928 as his personal residence. The architect was responsible for the design of four of the homes in the exclusive Laughlin Park enclave, a gated community within the Los Feliz district of Los Angeles.

    Located at 1975 De Mille Drive.
  • William Hall Residence, Albert & Alfred S. Heineman, Architects 1918
    Craftsman Bungalow style house designed for William Hall and Hazel Hall in 1918. The Heineman Brothers, after the Greene Brothers, were amongst the most prolific architects of the California Arts and Crafts Movement. Without any formal training, it is estimated that the pair contributed between 1,000 and 1,500 designs for buildings throughout California and the nation during their careers, including over twenty residences in Pasadena. They are also credited with the deveopment of the bungalow court.

    According to authors David Gebhard and Robert Winter (An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles), the house is 'Important because with its roof swooping into the eaves and Hansel and Gretel ornament, it demonstrates a tendency of the arts & crafts movement toward sentimentality'.

    The house was also the residence of Actor James Kirkwood in the 1920s. Located at 2324 N. Commonwealth Avenue n the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • William H. Perry Residence, E.F. Kysor, Architect, Heritage Square
    Designed by noted Architect E. F. Kysor for lumber baron William Hayes Perry in 1876 in the Greek Revival/Italianate Style. The house originally stood in Boyle Heights, a fashionable suburb of Los Angeles at the turn of the century. Its design and sheer size reflect the social class of the owners: marble fireplace mantles, formal staircase and fine hardwood floors. It was considered in its time to be the 'finest and most expensive home yet seen in Los Angeles.'
  • William H. Monroe House, 'The Oaks', Solon I. Haas, Architect c.1887
    The Oaks, also known as William N. Monroe House, is a Stick/Eastlake Queen Anne Style house built in 1885 for William N. Monroe, for whom the city of Monrovia was named. Monroe first brought his family to the Los Angeles area in 1875; serving on the Los Angeles City Council from 1879 until 1882, moved to Texas, and then returned in 1884. That year he purchased 240 acres for $30,000 from E.J. 'Lucky' Baldwin, land which was part of the Azusa de Duarte and Santa Anita ranchos. Together with Edward F. Spence, John D. Bicknell, J. F. Falvey, and James F. Crank, who had also purchased land from Baldwin, they decided to form a 60-acre town site from their combined holdings.

    The town of Monrovia was founded in 1886 and incorporated a year later in 1887, becoming the fourth oldest general law city in Los Angeles. Lots from the new town site were placed on the market on May 17, 1886, and since then that day has been celebrated as Monrovia Day.

    Initially, the Monroe family set up housekeeping in a tent at what is now the southeast corner of Hillcrest Boulevard and Magnolia Avenue. A temporary home (sometimes referred to as 'Monroe Cottage' and still standing on Monroe Place) was constructed for the family in 1884 while they awaited the completion of a more permanent home to be located at a site they had noticed when they first visited the area.

    'The Oaks', so named because of the numerous oak trees on the property, was completed in May of 1885. It was designed by architect Solon I. Haas and was constructed entirely of redwood.

    This Queen Anne style house with Eastlake detailing boasts 16 rooms and five fireplaces (originally, there were eleven rooms with a fireplace in every room) in its almost 4,400 square feet of living space, with 12-foot ceilings in many of the rooms. A large lawn, complete with a granite fountain and pool, graced the home's front entrance.

    The Monroes had a reputation for being gracious hosts, and guests stayed for weeks at a time in their spacious home. One oddity of the house today is that the front door does not face the street; rather, it faces south even though the house is located on Primrose, a street that runs north and south.

    The house suffered significant damage in the Whittier earthquake that struck on October 1, 1987. In addition to the large, ornate brick chimney toppling to the ground, there was such extensive damage to the lath and plaster walls that much of it had to be removed.

    The Monrovia Historic Preservation Group (then known by its former name, the Monrovia Old House Preservation Group) came to the rescue, helping owners George and Sheila Dragan remove much of the cracked and loosened lath and plaster, thereby reducing the overall cost of repair.

    Today, 'The Oaks' remains one of only a handful of large, multi-story Victorian homes that survives in Monrovia. Its association with Monroe marks it as one of the more notable homes in town. It is one of almost 86,000 properties nationwide listed on the National Register of Historic Places (it was listed in 1978), and it was the fourth home landmarked in the city of Monrovia. Located at 250 N. Primrose Avenue.
  • William Andrews Clark, Jr. Memorial, Robert Farquhar 1934
    Architect Robert Farquhar designed the mausoleum for philanthropist William Andrews Clark, Jr. (1877 – 1934). Clark was the youngest son of U.S. Senator William Andrews Clark, Sr. of Nevada, a copper baron and his wife Katherine. Clark was the prime mover in founding the Los Angeles Philharmonic in 1919 and later, the Hollywood Bowl. An avid collector of rare books and manuscripts; the library he founded was bequeathed to UCLA upon his death in 1934. Clark, his son William Andrews Clark, III and both wives, Mabel Duffield Foster and Alice McManus are buried in the family mausoleum at the Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Located at 6000 Santa Monica Boulevard in Hollywood, California.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved
  • William Andrews Clark Memorial Library, Robert Farquhar, Architect 1924-26
    The library was established by William Andrews Clark, Jr. (1877 –1934), a prominent philanthropist and founder of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra (1919). The library is named in honor of his father, Sen. William Andrews Clark, who had built a mining fortune in Montana. Clark lived at the corner of Adams Blvd. and Cimarron Street; between 1924 and 1926 he engaged prominent architect Robert D. Farquhar to design a library for his rare books and manuscripts, renowned for their collections of 17th- and 18th-century English literature and history. The library was bequeathed to the University of California at Los Angeles in 1934.

    Robert Farquhar also designed the California Club in downtown Los Angeles (Historic-Cultural Monument No. 43) and the Canfield-Moreno Estate in Silver Lake (HCM # 391), as well as Beverly Hills High School (1928). The library is located at 2520 Cimarron Street in the West Adams district. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1964 (no. 28).
  • Willard J. Doran Residence, John C. Austin, Architect 1905
    Craftsman style residence designed by prominent architect John C. Austin for Willard J. Doran, a noted financier and railroad developer. The structure features an informal plan, non-symmetrical elevations; wood shingle and clapboard exterior finish; and a masonry
    chimney. Located at 1194 W. 27th Street in the North University Park National Register Historic District. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 820) in 2005.
  • Widney Hall, University of Southern California, E.F. Kysor & Octavius Morgan, Architects, 1880
    The first building of the University of Southern California, built during the first year of the school's existence (1880). Over the years the building came to be known as Widney Hall, its facade was altered and painted, and moved to different locations on campus. It has survived as Alumni House, now located across from the Doheny Library.

    Widney Hall is located on the USC Campus at 650 Childs Way. It was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1970 (No. 70).
  • Widner House, Arthur E. Harvey, Architect 1934
    Monterey Colonial Style residence designed by Architect Arthur E. Harvey for W.P. Widner in 1934. Located at 3599 Griffith Park Blvd. in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Whittier Union High School, William H. Harrison 1939-1940
    Architect William H. Harrison put his stamp on the City of Whittier, California, designing many of the prominent buildings in town, including El Ranch High School (1954-55), Lincoln School (c.1935); Lou Henry Hoover School (1938); and the buildings of the civic center, including City Hall (1955) and the Public Library (1959). Several of the buildings were designed in a PWA Moderne style; the Whittier Union High School, designed between 1939 and 1940 is a good example. Located at 12417 Philadelphia St, Whittier, CA.
  • Whittier City Hall, William H. Harrison 1955
    Architect William H. Harrison put his stamp on the City of Whittier, California, designing many of the prominent buildings in town, including El Ranch High School (1954-55), Lincoln School (c.1935); Whittier Union High Scholl (1939-1940); Lou Henry Hoover School (1938); and the buildings of the civic center, including City Hall (1955) and the Public Library (1959). The dominant element of the exterior design is the stone tower, surmounted by two cylinders and topped by a beacon, symbolizing 'enlightened government.'

    Located at 13230 Penn Street.
  • Whiting House, Lester G. Scherer, Architect 1930







    Art Deco style Residence for Pioneer Building Merchant Perry Whiting designed by Architect Lester G. Scherer in 1930. The house was featured in the film 'The Natural' and the television features 'Children of the Night' and 'With the Bullet' featuring Robert Carradine, and Joan Collins in a tequila advertisement. Eighty-nine doors in the house were salvaged from the old Jonathan Club.

    The architect designed many notable Los Angeles landmarks during his career, including the Todd Johnston House in Holmby HIlls, the Mediterranean style Meade House 'La Casa de las Campanas' in Hancock Park, and Our Lady of Lourdes Roman Catholic Church in Boyle Heights.

    The house is located at 5120 Linwood Drive in Laughlin Park, an exclusive gated community within the Los Feliz district of Los Angeles.
  • Westwood Center, Michael Walden, Nadel Partnership 1999
    A older building wrapped in a new skin, the Westwood Center is one of the most dramatic high rise structures in Westwood. Located at 1100 Glendon Avenue.
  • Westridge School Sustainable Science Building, Pica + Sullivan Architects 2010








    The new center is a state-of the-art facility constructed to LEED Gold Standards, including high indoor air quality standards, daylight in every room including below grade space, a solar array, storm water management and water efficient landscaping. The building was made possible through a gift made by the late Clough Sims Steele III, a Founding Member of the Madeline Society.

    The building is located near the northeast corner of S. Orange Grove Boulevard and Madeline Drive in Pasadena, California.
  • Westin Bonaventure Hotel, John Portman, Architect 1976
    Postmodern design by hotel architect John Portman, completed in 1976. The structure has been featured in many films including Mission Impossible III, Hancock, Escape from L.A. Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, Blue Thunder, In the Line of Fire, Midnight Madness amongst many others, and the television series CSI and It's a Living.

    Portman also designed the Embarcadero Center in San Francisco, the Renaissance Center in Detroit, MI and the Westin Peachtree Plaza Hotel and Peachtree Center in Atlanta, GA. The hotel is located at 404 S. Figueroa St. in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Western Prelacy, Armenian Apostolic Church, Alajajian Marcoosi Architects (AMA) 2004
    AMA has successfully integrated ancient and modern concepts in the Western Prelacy of the Armenian Apostolic Church, as evidenced in this photo.
  • Western Prelacy of the Armenian Apostolic Church, Alajajian Marcoosi Architects (AMA) 2004
    Alajajian Marcoosi Architects was one of four firms invited to participate in the concept design competition for the Western Prelacy of the Armenian Apostolic Church in 2003. The program required the renovation of an existing office building, converting its use into a chapel, mulitpurpose hall and administrative offices.

    From the outset, AMA's design philosphy was to express the mix of traditions and contemporary architecture in a harmonious manner. The exterior expressions were developed from the fragments of Medieval Armenian architecture. The idea of new forms and materials ascend from the ashes of ancient stone architecture.

    The half archways, cross stone walls, khachkars, stepped doorway details at the entry were set to create the base, the outer layer of the buidling. The metal panel walls and curtain glass were set as an inner layer. The entire foyer connecting the two administrative wings were towered by a cross-like carved skylight illuminating the two story atrium.

    The Chapel is a traditional dome emerging from the ground at the visible northeast corner of the complex. A massive wall on the western side, symbolizing eternity, carries a water fountain dedicated to the victims of the Armenian Genocide. Hand-carved tuvo stone elements, imported from Armenia were used as accents in the walls to furthur emphasize the building's traditional character.

    The Western Prelacy of the Armenian Apostolic Church is located at 6260 Honolulu Avenue in La Crescenta, CA. Thanks to Aram Alajajian who contributed extensively to this review.
  • Wesley Heath House, Marsh, Smith & Powell Architects c.1930
    Driving around the neighborhood I call 'home', I never stop being amazed at the rich variety of architecture that I am discovering for the very first time. This well-maintained Streamline Moderne style house was designed for Wesley Heath by architects Marsh. Smith & Powell in 1930. The firm, consisting of principals Norman Foote Marsh, David M. Smith and Herbert James Powell, was the University Architect at the University of Southern California, and employed a number of USC architecture alumni right out of school including Thornton M. Abell, who worked as designer, chief draftsman, and architect superintendent in the years 1930-1942; William F. Cody, and Whitney R. Smith.

    Perhaps the firm's best known work is the Streamline Moderne style Hollywood High School, completed in 1933. They also designed the ornate Gordon Parkhurst Building in Santa Monica, the Taper Hall for the Humanities at the University of Southern California as well as many churches and schools throughout Southern California.

    The Wesley Heath House is located at 2261 Ronda Vista Drive in the Franklin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles. The house has many of the features associated with the moderne style, including smooth stucco walls, ornamental piping and rails, rounded edges, corner windows, and flat roof with coping details.
  • Weeplo Duplex, Marshall P. Wilkinson 1960
    Marshall P. Wilkinson established his reputation in the 1920s and 1930s, designing romantich homes for some of Hollyywood's most illustrious stars including Alan Ladd, Fred Astaire, Russ Columbo, Douglas Fairbanks, Jr. and Carole Lombard. By 1960 he was designing more international style homes, like the Weeplo Duplex in Silver Lake. The property last sold in 2003 for $646,915 and was described in the listing as ' On a site affording hillside vistas to the East, designer Marshall Wilkinson crafted two post and beam residences that are dramatic in their utter simplicity. Separated by a reflection pond in the carport entry, each one-bedroom unit is finished with terrazzo floors, laminate counter tops, fireplace and entertainment decks overlooking the view.'

    Located at 2323 Silver Ridge Avenue in the Silver Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles, California.
  • Wee Kirk O' The Heather, F.A. Hansen, Architect
    The Wee Kirk is said to be a reproduction of the village church attended by Annie Laurie in Glencairn, Scotland. The original church was erected in 1310 and destroyed in 1805 A.D.

    The Wee Kirk O' The Heather is located within the grounds of Forest Lawn Memorial Park, 1712 S. Glendale Blvd. in Glendale, CA.)
  • Weaver House, Meyer & Holler (Milwaukie Building Company) 1910-1911
    Although Santa Monica was founded, planned and plotted as early as 1875 (by city founders Senator John P. Jones and landowner Colonel Robert S. Baker) the earliest homes I have been able to locate are the half dozen or so Craftsman style homes, ringling the palisades of Santa Monica along Adelaide Drive. The Weaver House located at 142 Adelaide Drive is an outstanding example.
  • Wayne McAllister Residence c.1939
    It always leaves me scratching my head a bit knowing that Wayne McAllister chose to live in this simple late Colonial style house in Los Feliz. The commercial architecture created by Wayne McAllister defined much of the character of Southern California, elevating the drive-in restaurant to an art form. McAllister is best known as one of the chief proponents of the 'Googie' style, and although few of his projects are still standing, we still have Bob's Big Boy in Burbank to remind us of his influence.

    Located at 3640 Shannon Road.
  • Wayfarer's Chapel, Lloyd Wright, Architect 1949-51
    The chapel helped Frank Lloyd Wright, Jr. to emerge from the long shadow of his eminent father and distinguish himself as a great architect in his own right. The Swedenborgian Church, which commissioned the work, had envisioned a 'Mission' style church to which Wright is said to have replied, 'I don't do Mission style'. The inspiration for the design came from an experience in the California redwoods. Wright had stopped at a '...restaurant in a redwood grove, and looking up through the glass skylights, saw the redwoods towering overhead and the sky above the trees. Below, there were great ferns and a cascade of tumbling water. He sensed great peace, sublime beauty, dignity and respose.'**

    The Wayfarer's Chapel is located at 5755 Palos Verdes Drive South in Ranch Palos Verdes.

    **from the book, 'The Beauty of Holiness: Story of the Wayfarer's Chapel' by Ernest O. Martin, Donning Company, Publishers, 2007.
  • Watts Towers, Simon Rodia, Designer-Builder 1921-1954
    A colorful lacework of 17 whimsical towers designed by Sabato “Simon” Rodia in his spare time over a period of 33 years. The towers are a fantasy of found objects Rodia picked up from the nearby railroad tracks and broken pieces of pottery from the Malibu Pottery, where he worked for many years. Scrap rebar, wrapped with wire mesh, coated with mortar, and imbedded with broken china, scrap metal, pieces of glass and sea shells are among the materials he used. The Italian immigrant called the towers Nuestro Pueblo or 'our town”.
    The towers were deeded to the State of California in 1978. The property is now designated the Watts Towers of Simon Rodia State Historic Park. Located at 1765 E. 107th Street in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles. Designated a Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument in 1963 (No. 15) and a National Historic Landmark in 1990.
  • Wattles Mansion, Myron Hunt & Elmer Grey 1907
    The Wattles House and Gardens were designed in 1907 by the architectural firm of Myron Hunt and Elmer Grey, the preeminent architects of the day. The Mission Revival style house was one of several the partnership designed. The house is renowned for its terraced gardens that at one time extended all the way down the hill to Hollywood Boulevard. The mansion is maintained, operated and funded by the Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks and may be rented for special events and filming. It was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1993 (No. 579).

    Myron Hunt was Los Angeles' first practicing architect to receive a professional degree. After graduating from Northwestern University and M.I.T., he took an extended tour of Europe before returning to the Unitd States. He worked for a time in Chicago before moving to California. He was the first architect with an impressive resume to permanently settle in Los Angeles. By the time he received the Wattles commission he was too busy to handle the workload by himself, and took in Elmer Grey as a partner. After completing the Wattles Mansion, the pair were hIred by Henry Huntington to design a spectacular estate in San Marino, complete with acres of rolling lawn and studded with native oaks. When the house was finished it was the only Los Angeles house to be included in the c.1914 book, 'Stately Homes of California.' They also designed a house for writer Zane Grey in Altadena, California.


    The Wattles Mansion, park and gardens are located at 1824-1850 Curson Avenue in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California.
  • Warren & Belle Dunn Mansion, C.W Buchanan, Architect 1904







    The historic home of Warren K. and Belle R. Dunn, designed by Architect C.W. Buchanan in 1904. The building is currently named for Herbert J. Taylor, a close friend and counselor of Charles Fuller, the Founder of Fuller Seminary and a member f the seminary's founding Board of Trustees. Taylor was President of Club Aluminum Company, a devoted Christian, he established the Christian Workers Foundation and was a charter member of the National Association of Evangelicals. He served Fuller Seminary with his leadership and love for 31 years.

    The mansion was designed in the Craftsman style and maintains much of the character of the original design, except for the enclosure of the back porch. Located at Oakland Avenue and Ford Place, on the campus of Fuller Theological Seminary in Pasadena, California.
  • Warner Brothers Theater, B. Marcus Priteca 1930
    Theater architect Benjamin Marcus Priteca (1889-1971) is best known as the architect for the Pantages theatres. He met theater mogul Alexander Pantages, whom he met in Seattle in 1910. His first commission was for the San Francisco Pantages Theater (1911), the first of many so-named vaudeville and motion picture houses in what would become one of the largest theater chains in North America.

    In all, Priteca designed 22 theaters for Pantages and another 128 for other theater owners, including the Coliseum (1915) in Seattle; the Pantages (1918) in Tacoma, Washington; the Pantages (1920) in Los Angeles (downtown); the Pantages in San Diego (1924); the Pantages (1928) in Fresno, California; the Paramount (1929) in Seattle; the Pantages (1929) in Hollywood (the last and largest of the Pantages theaters); the Warner on Pacific Boulevard in Huntington Park (1930); and the Admiral (1938) in West Seattle.

    The secret of Priteca's success lay in his ability to create the illusion of opulence on a modest budget. Modernist architect Gregory Ain served an apprenticeship under Priteca in the 1920s and went on to be one the most important practitioners of the style.

    The theatre is located a 6714 S. Pacific Blvd. in Huntington Park, California.


  • Waring House, A.F. Leicht, Architect 1929
    Classic Art Nouveau Mediterranean Mansion designed by A.F Leicht in 1929 for Bruce Waring. Walled and gated, I took the above photo from nearby Cedarhurst Drive. The house is huge; 9813 sq. feet on approximately one acre, with six master suites, a two-story living room with mezzanine, banquet-sized family room, huge billiards/media room and separate house for staff. Located at 2238 Ben Lomond Drive in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles..
  • Walters House, Glendale, CA 1923
    Located high above the road at the southest corner of Verdugo Road and Sparr Boulevard, this hillside home is a spirited extravaganza of the Spanish Revival Style.

    The Walters House is located at 3000 Sparr Boulevard in the City of Glendale, CA. It was listed by the Glendale Register of Historic Places in 1977 (No. 29)
  • Walt Disney House, F. Scott Crowhurst, Architect 1932
    Walt Disney didn't have far to drive to work after having this English Tudor home built for him in 1932. The Disney Studios were located a short distance away at 2725 Hyperion Avenue. The studio, built in 1926, has since been demolished (Gelson's Market now sits on the site). Incidently, there are a few other similarly styled buildings in the immediate area: the eight little cottages located at 2900-2912 1/2 Griffith Park Blvd. and the lovely Tudor cottage located at 3141 Griffith Park Blvd. (which locals refer to as the 'Houses of the Seven Dwarves' and 'Snow White's Cottage' respectively).

    The Disney House is located at 4053 Woking Way in Los Feliz.
  • Walt Disney Feature Animation Building, Robert A.M. Stern Architects 1994

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    Walt Disney Picture's Feature Animation Studios. Located on the campus of Disney's Burbank studio lot. The arching wedge is the building’s façade facing the Ventura Freeway; its shape a reference to the passing commuter traffic. A cone-shaped tower, an inspiration from the Sorcerer’s Apprentice, forms a part of the complex. The language of the design embraces the original concept of Kem Weber's original Animation Building (1939) now used for offices on the studio lot.

    Robert A.M. Stern Architects has an impressive list of completed projects including the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, Massachusetts; Ohrstrom Library, St. Paul's School, Concord, New Hampshire; the Brooklyn Law School Tower, Brooklyn, New York; the Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia; Bloomberg Center at the Harvard Business School; the Jones Graduate School of Business Management at Rice University; the Greenspun College of Urban Affairs at the University of Nevada; U.S. Courthouses in Beckley, West Virginia, Youngstown, Ohio, and Richmond, Virginia; the Hobby Center for the Performing Arts, Houston, Texas; and the Museum Center at the Mark Twain House in Hartford, Connecticut, among others.

    The property can be easily seen from the Ventura Freeway, west of Forest Lawn Drive. For a closer look follow West Riverside Drive, east of Buena Vista Street, turn right on South Reese Place and right again on South Beachwood Drive. There are riding trails to your immediate right; if you turn back around to your right, you can follow the trails right up to the curving facade.
  • Wallace Beery Duplex, William Kesling, Designer/Builder 1936
    In 1936, Wallace Beery was Hollywood's highest earning male star living in a Beverly Hills mansion. In order to be closer to the Hollywood studios, he had William Kesling design two residences for him, a noteworthy Streamline Moderne home on Martel Avenue, and a duplex on Harper Avenue in West Hollywood. Both were completed in 1936. The duplex was presumably built to accommodate friends and figures in the entertainment industry. The choice of Kesling as designer reflects the actor's flamboyant style and avid interest in aircraft and flying.

    The Beery Duplex is located at 756 Waring Avenue (corner of Harper Avenue in West Hollywood.)
  • Walker House, Clarence J. Smale, Architect 1924
    Architect Smale designed the Mediterranean style house for Haberdasher Harry W. Walker in 1924. Located at 2230 N. Catalina Street in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.

    Smale also designed the Gustave Larson Residence on Nottingham Avenue, the Italianate Mediterranean style mansion on Ambrose Avenue for W.O. Boston (1924), the Mediterranean Revival style Monsignor O'Brien Residence on Catalina Street (declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (#861) in 2007, the historically-designated Loyola Theater in Westchester (recently converted to an office building) and the Smith House at Second and Hudson Avenue in Hancock Park, as well as numerous other movie palaces most of which have been demolished.
  • Waite Phillips Hall of Education (USC), Edward D. Stone, Architect 1968
    Described by architectural historians Gebhard & Winter in their comprehensive work 'An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles' as the 'finest of the post-World War II group of buildings on the USC campus', the three structures designed by the firm of Edward D. Stone Associates (the Von KleinSmid Center of International Affairs, the Social Science Building and the Waite Phillips Hall of Education) between 1966 and 1968 express the embodiment of the university's third Master Plan, as envisioned by the architectural firm of William Pereira and Associates. The high tower of the Waite Phillips Hall of Education rises above a stylized freestanding brick cloister.
  • W Hotel Hollywood, HKS Architects 2010
    Luxury Hotel located at the world-famous section of Hollywood and Vine, the gateway to the Hollywood Historic District, the site includes the 300-room hotel, 144 luxury condominiums and over 40,000 sq ft of street-level retail. A glass façade and red-carpeted interior is meant to symbolize the silver screen, conceived as a tribute to the movie industry and the celebrity culture and city surrounding it. Roof top terraces located throughout the project give guests a sense of being part of the glamour. Located at 6250 Hollywood Blvd.
  • Von KleinSmid Center of International & Public Affairs, USC, Edward D. Stone Associates, Architects
    I probably passed this building a hundred times without giving it much thought. It wasn't until this past fall (2006) as I walked across campus in the early evening, that I began to notice how special this building is. Bathed in the light of the late afternoon sun and a spectacularly-lit Carillon Tower, the Von KleinSmid Center captures the imagination. USC President Rufus B. von KleinSmid, who held a keen interest in the study of international relations, nurtured the founding of the school, for the purpose of 'furnishing opportunities for the training of statesmen for consular and diplomatic service, of businessmen for commerce and business administration, and for teachers in departments related to world affairs in colleges and universities.' The school is the third oldest in the world devoted to the study of international affairs.
  • Von KleinSmid Center of International & Public Affairs (USC), Edward D. Stone, Architect 1966
    The cloistered courtyard of the Von KleinSmid Center of International and Public Affairs on the main campus of the University of Southern California.
  • Vista Grande Townhouses, Buff & Hensman 1981
    The wood-and-stucco townhouses were designed by the firm of Conrad Buff and Donald Hensman in 1981. Located at 72-108 South Grand Avenue in Pasadena, California.
  • Viso House, Hodgetts + Fung Design 1989
    The stucco-wrapped house Vison house was designed by architects Craig Hodgetts and HsinMing Fung (HplusF) in 1989. Founded in 1984, the firm has several noteworthy projects to its credit, including the Towell Library at UCLA, a re-interpretation of the Hollywood Bowl shell; the UCLA Gateway, the Egyptian Theater, and pavilions at Art Center College and California Institute of the Arts.

    The Viso House is located at 6911 Viso Drive in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • Villa Riviera Apartments, Richard D. King, Architect 1928
    French Chateauesque style apartment building designed by architect Richard D. King in 1928, located along the Long Beach seashore at 800 East Ocean Avenue.
  • Villa Pozzo, Arlos R. Sedgley, Architect 1938
    The Spanish Revival style residence was designed by Architect Arlos R. Sedgley for the Pozzo family, a venerable Southern California builder that opened for business in 1898 near Olvera Street in downtown Los Angeles. The four-generation, family-run business, became a wholly owned subsidiary of Blount Bros. Corp. of Montgomery, Ala. (a Blount Inc. company) in 1986. Louis Pozzo, affectionately known as Papa Luigi, was a deeply religious man with consummate pride in his Italian heritage and in the standards of craftsmanship passed down by forebears rooted in the building trade for about 300 years in Italy's Piedmont region. A USC alumnus later honored as a USC Man of the Year, Pozzo served on the university's board of governors, and was also affiliated with UCLA as a member of the Dean's Council of the Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Planning. Located at 2358 N. Vermont Avenue.
  • Villa Maria, Frederick L. Roehrig, Architect 1908
    After amassing a fortune in Louisiana timber, William E. Ramsay retired to Southern California, and immediately set about the task of building a great mansion that would establish his social standing and reputation. He commissioned Frederick L. Roehrig, one of the most visible architects of the period for the work. (Among Roehrig's other important commissions are the Hotel Green (1898), the Ezra Stimson Estate (1901) and the Rindge House in 1905) Unfortunately for Ramsay, he died in 1909, shortly after the mansion was completed.

    The 42-room English Tudor mansion in West Adams was featured in a Los Angeles Times article after it was completed, calling it 'among the finest homes in Los Angeles' and one of Roehrig's 'best efforts'.

    After his death, Ramsay's widow continued to live at the mansion until her death in 1916. Later, the house was leased to movie tycoon Rupert Hughes (an uncle to Howard Hughes), who threw elaborate parties at the mansion. In the early '20's, the mansion was sold to a prominent figure in horse racing, William E. Durfee and his wife, Nellie McGaughey Durfee, the daughter of a Figueroa Street millionaire. After Durfee died of food poisoning in 1927, his widow continued to live in the mansion in obscurity until she died in 1976.

    The mansion was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1980 (No. 230) Now known as the 'Villa Maria' the estate functions as the Provincial Headquarters of the Hospitaller Order of St. John of God and serves as the home for the Brothers of the Order. Br. Stephen de la Rosa is historian and archivist for the order and gave us a recent tour; a visit there is a rewarding step back in time.

    The Villa Maria is located at 2468 S. St. Andrews Place in the West Adams neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Villa Manola, Hollywood Hills, Paul Williams, Architect 1924

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    Thanks to my friend J. Russell Brown, Villa Manola was my first significant architectural listing. IBrown gave nine years of his life to its restoration and embellishment.

    Designed by Paul Williams, the 'Architect of the Stars', the Villa Manola was created as a 'Morrocan palace' for Hollywood socialite Mrs. E. L. Martin, Founder of the Hollywood Hills Hunt Club in 1924.

    Exuberant yet restrained, the villa is secluded at the end of a private cul-de-sac. The stunning courtyard has been fashioned after the courtyard outside the Alhambra in Granada, which influenced Williams' original design. Mr. Brown, in his restoration of the villa, embellished the Moorish theme with the addition of Morrocan lanterns and art objects acquired during his many trips abroad.

    The villa has an illustrious past. It was the residence of The Beatles during their Capitol Records days. Allen Ginsberg was a later resident. A Jean Cocteau dance short was filmed here in the early 1930's. Mr. Brown, a community activist, used the villa extensively for numerous civic and charitable events. In 2003, the villa was acquired by actress Sherie Hellard. Located at 5900 Manola Way in the Hollywood Hills.
    Cameron Carothers Photo
  • Villa Francesca, Leland E. Bryant, Architect 1911
    One of the earliest luxury apartment complexes in Pasadena, Villa Francesca, designed by Leland E. Bryant c.1911. The Moroccan-inspired architecture is set on the campus of now defunct Ambassador College. The large units are currently (November 2012) available for lease for $4000 per month. The units have been meticulously restored, according to the listing, 'being mindful of the original features. Hardwood floors throughout, vaulted beamed ceiling in the living room, balconies for living room and master bedroom, wood burning majestic fireplace, large French windows, spacious dining room, stainless steel appliances in the warm and inviting kitchen. Baths are updated with claw foot tubs.an enclosed shower, and beautiful vanities.'

    The architect also designed the French Chateauesque style Trianon Apartments in Hollywood (1928) and the art deco style Argyle Hotel (Sunset Tower) in West Hollywood.

    Located at 248 South Orange Grove Boulevard.
  • Villa de Liones, 4601 Dundee Drive
    Villa de Liones, a Beux-Arts Tuscan-style villa would appear to have been built in the 1920's during the heyday of classical architecture in Los Feliz, however it was built in 2000. An impressive monument in the 'Hearst Castle manner', the home boasts a two-story entry, six bedrooms and 6.5 baths, wood-paneled library, magnificent public rooms, a home theatre, pool, spa and gazebo, with plenty of classical balustrades and statues thrown in for good measure.

    As of April 2006, it was listed for sale for a whopping $6,280,000.
  • Victor Rossetti House, Paul R. Williams, Architect 1928

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    Victor Rossetti's rapid rise through the ranks of the banking industry began as an office boy for Wells Fargo in San Francisco in his early 20’s. Within twenty years he was Vice President of Farmers and Merchants Bank in Los Angeles, the oldest financial institution in Southern California. Three years after he and his wife Irene moved into the Ponet Drive house, he became President of the bank, a position he held for the next twenty five years. Rossetti selected Paul R. Williams, one of the most important architects of the time to design his home in the Spanish Colonial Revival Style, embracing the California lifestyle and the region’s romantic past. Williams added coffered and stenciled ceilings, a dramatic two-story entryway with sweeping staircase, a library, intercom system and a wooden elevator connecting the garage to all levels of the house. Victor and Irene Rossetti lived at the house for the length of their marriage, until Irene died in 1947. After her death, Rossetti retired. , selling the house in 1950 and moved to San Marino., and the house was sold in 1950 when Rossetti retired and moved to San Marino, California. Except for earthquake retro-fitting, the addition of bathrooms, and updated heating, cooling, electrical and plumbing systems, the aesthetics of the house are little changed. Victor, Irene, and their two children would have little trouble feeling right at home again. The Victor Rossetti Residence is located at 2188 Ponet Drive in Los Feliz. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 2008 (No. 915).
  • Victor M. Carter Residence, Milton J. Black, Architect 1935; Esta Sullivan (Renovation)
    A gem of the Streamline Moderne style, I initially thought this home might have been the work of William Kesling, who designed the Johnstone House on nearby Lowry Road in the same year. Built next door to Rudolf Schindler's Elliott House, the home relishes in the aerodynamic details of the style, including art deco lighting, copper edging along the roofline and in the details, and a porthole window in the front door. On meeting the current owner, I was delighted to be introduced to architect Milton J. Black, another master of the style. Black had a distinguished career building significant apartment buildings in Los Angeles in the 1930's. The house is located at 4241 Newdale Drive in Los Feliz.

    Like his contemporary, Paul R. Williams, Black was not so much beholden to a particular architectural style, rather he was a good businessman in first considering the wishes of his client. Black's contribution include both his signature Streamline Moderne style as well as some noteworthy Spanish Revival examples. Signtificant art deco buildings designed by Black in Los Angeles include the Mauretania; a ten-unit apartment building shaped like an ocean liner (located at 520-522 N. Rossmore Avenue in Larchmont Village, the complex was built for actor Jack Haley, the Tin Man in the 'Wizard of Oz'. Haley lived in the complex's extensive penthouse for 20 years with his wife, Flo). Black also designed a 4-plex located at the corner of 9th Street and Hobart Blvd. near MacArthur Park; and another apartment building at 462 S. Cochran Avenue in the Wilshire district. The Cernitz House in Pacific Palisades (located at 601 Amalfi Drive in the Pacific Palisades) is also one of Black's moderne designs, built in 1938, as are the Westwood-Ambassador Apartments, located at 10427 Wilshire Blvd., completed in 1940.

    Noteworthy Spanish Revival properties designed by Black include El Cadiz, located in Hollywood at 1731 Sycamore Avenue completed in 1936 and the apartment building at 654 S. Burnside Avenue, which was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1989 No. 426. He is also credited with the programmatic design of the Tail of the Pup hot dog stand at 329 N. San Vicente Blvd., declared a cultural landmark in 1987.

  • Victor M. Carter Residence, Milton J. Black, Architect 1935, Esta Sullivan (Restoration 1980-1996)
    Architect Milton Black would be proud of Esta Sullivan for her vision and perserverance in restoring the Carter Residence in Los Feliz. The Sullivans invested eighteen years in the process. Purchasing the home in 1978, they began renovating in earnest after the ceiling came down during a rainstorm two years later. During the first two years the couple reroofed the house twice, removed crystal chandeliers, bobeche-draped wall lights, silver/orange-flocked wallpaper and scraped-up orange, green and yellow arabesque patterned linoleum and re-painted the interiors. They dug up the concrete basketball court that was their backyard and planted a garden.

    During the next sixteen years, Esta Sullivan, an accomplished interior designer, began her non-stop search for deco fixtures and furniture. 'I looked for tile in dingy little shops off the beaten track that carried discontinued or leftover tile, I even found some Catalina tile, pretty rare these days, in pristine conditon dating from the thirties', she said, 'Everywhere I went I asked where I could find other things I was looking for.' She eventually found the things she needed, 'not quite the exact color or size, but the difference was undetectable'.. She found treasures in second-hand stores and junk shops in places like Eagle Rock, Compton and Long Beach.

    Today, the Victor M. Carter Residence is a shining example of the Streamline Moderne Style, a testament to the architect who designed it originally, and the imagination and fortitude of the woman who rescued it.

    The Victor M. Carter Residence is located at 4241 Newdale Drive in Los Feliz.
  • Veterans Memorial Building, Donley Bundy & Associates 1950
    The Veterans Memorial Building was dedicated on March 9, 1951, with Lt. Governor Goodwin Knight in attendance. The 122 feet high “tourist tower” was designed to view “back lot” movie sets at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios across the street. The prominent fountain entitled, 'Film Strip USA, The Heart of Screenland' was designed by sculptor Natalie Krol in 1981 and dedicated to the 'citizens of Culver City, the Motion Picture Capital of the World'. Designated a Culver City historic site in 2011 (No. 13).

    Located at 4117 Culver Boulevard in Culver City, California.
  • Vercellini House- Architect Unknown 1927
    Located in the Adams Hill area of Glendale, in the shadow of Forest Lawn Memorial Park, the Vercellini Residence looks like a fortress that you might encounter along the Mediterranean Sea. A castle-style battlement lookout provides a bird's eye view of the city of Glendale and the San Gabriel Mountains in the distance. A rose garden in a forest of cypress and pines create a fairyland composition.

    The Vercellini House is located at 604 Alta Vista Drive in the Adams Hill neighborhood of Glendale, CA. The house was listed in the Glendale Register of Historic Places (No. 41) in 2002.
  • Venice of America House c.1906
    The house was commissioned by Abbott Kinney, a key figure in the development of the beach-side community of Venice, California. It was Kinney's dream to transform the area into a 'Venice of America'. He succeeded for a time, but the idea was less popular with locals, especially the merchants, who felt the canals impeded commerce.

    The house has been restored and is a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 724). Located at 1223 Cabrillo Avenue in Venice, California.
  • Venice Arcade, C.R. Russell 1904
    One of the few remaining vestige's of 'Venice of America', Abbot Kinney's project of transforming the beach side community into a Venice of the west.. He succeeded for a time, but the idea was less popular with locals, especially merchants, who felt the canals impeded commerce.

    The Venice Arcades, including the columns and capitals are a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 532). Located at 67-71 Windward Avenue.
  • Venetian House c.1905
    The Venetian House is one of the oldest houses in Venice, dating from the days when Abbot Kinney sought to transform the beach side community into a 'Venice of the West'. The house has both Moorish and Byzantine elements. Located at 453 Rialto Avenue.
  • Van Rossem House, Charles & Henry Greene 1904
    The Greene Brothers designed the Craftsman style house for Josephine Van Rossem, a real estate speculator in 1904. Located at 210 North Grand Avenue in the Upper Arroyo Seco neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • Van Nuys House, Frederick L. Roehrig, Architect 1898








    Colonial Revival Shingle Style, designed by Architect Frederick L. Roehrig in 1898 for Isaac Newton Van Nuys, a wheat farmer with enormous real estate holdings in the San Fernando Valley. The area where his farm once stood is now the thriving community of Van Nuys, named after him.

    Located at 357 South Lorraine Boulevard in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. The house was used in the movie 'Cheaper by the Dozen' filmed here in 2003.
  • Van Kuik House, Barker & Ott Architects 1935
    Architects Barker & Ott designed the Spanish Revival style residence for John Anthony 'Jack' and Marie Van Kuik in 1935. The couple were active in local social circles; Jack was a Director of the Los Feliz Improvement Association (LFIA) in 1941; while Marie was a member of the Los Feliz Woman's Club between 1938 and 1966. Located at 3681 Shannon Road in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Van Griffith Residence c.1925
    The home of Van Griffith, son of Griffith J. Griffith, the man who donated the park that bears his name to the City of Los Angeles in 1896. The compound, is currently on the market and listed for sale at $4,875,000. Sited on nearly ¾ acre at the foot of Griffith Park, the historic compound has 6 bedrooms, a Montecito-style guest house, pool, private spa, park-like grounds, and loggia with outdoor fireplace.

    During his lifetime, Van Griffith was a Park Commissioner and served as President of the Los Feliz Improvement Association (LFIA) in both 1933 and 1937. He and his wife Constance were still living in the house in 1960. The house was restored in 1988 and was the residence of Marco Pennette, producer of the sitcom, 'Caroline in the City' and Steven Rabiner, consulting producer on the show 'Lucky' until 2003. The house is located at 2630 North Vermont Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.

  • Van De Kamp's Windmill, Harold Bissner 1967
    We first moved to Southern California in 1958; my father John A. Locke, had just accepted a position as Assistant Engineer at Van de Kamp's Holland Dutch Bakery. Moving from Portland, Oregon, my folks looked for a house close to work with good schools; they settled in Glendale, California and dad went to work everyday at the Van de Kamps plant located at the corner of San Fernando Road and Fletcher Drive. At the time, windmill restaurants like the one above, dotted the Southern California landscape. The restaurants always had a section where you could purchase goodies from the bakery, served by waitresses dressed in Dutch costumes. During the summers, my brother Dave and I would accompany my dad down to the plant and give him a hand replacing the caster wheels on the carts where the baked goods were first placed for cooling and packaging. Our reward was getting to spend time with each other and stuffing ourselves with pies and cookies from the packages that were not fit for delivery. The architect, Harold Bissner and my dad were good friends; he was Van de Kamp's 'official' architect, designing not only buildings for the bakery but private residences as well.

    The Van de Kamp Windmill Restaurant is one of the few remaining and is now a Denny's restaurant located on historic Route 66 in Achadia, California at 7 E. Huntington Drive (corner of Santa Anita Avenue) .
  • Van de Kamp's Holland Dutch Bakery, J. Edwin Hopkins, Architect 1930

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    Designed by New York architect J. Edward Hopkins to resemble a Dutch 16th century farmhouse, the only example of an industrial plant in the Dutch Renaissance Revival style. The bakery closed after Van de Kamp‘s filed for Chapter 11 in 1990. It sat vacant for two decades, while rival groups competed for various adaptive re-use of the facility.

    The property has undergone a $50-million to $60-million rehabilitation that saved the bakery's landmark facade in preparation for conversion to a satellite campus for Los Angeles City College, financed primarily with a community college bond measure approved by voters. Against the protests of community activists that fought for the college, the trustees have leased the facility to a charter school.

    The building is a designated Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, declared in 1992. Located at 3020 San Fermando Road.
  • Valley Knudsen Garden Residence, Heritage Square, 3800 Homer Street
    Originally located in Lincoln Heights, one of the first suburbs in Los Angeles, which at the time was a very popular tourist destination, having a large public park with both an ostrich and alligator farm. The home, also known as the Shaw House is most unusual for its time and location: it is in a style popular in Paris during the early 1800s known as Mansard, which was probably chosen for its majestic appearance.

    The house was built in about 1880 and moved to its present location in 1971. It was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1970 (No. 65).
  • USC School of Cinematic Arts, Urban Design Group 2011
    Urban Design Group designed the new School of Cinematic Arts at the University of Southern California (USC) in a Mediterranean Revival Style School, completed in 2010. The occasion marked the 80th anniversary of the school which was the first university in the United States to offer a Bachelor of Arts degree in film and is considered to be the the top-ranked film, television, and interactive media school in the country. The main building is a four-story, 137,000-square-foot facility housing classrooms, production labs, and administrative offices, as well as a 200-seat theater, an exhibition hall, and a café situated off a central courtyard. Completed in 2010, the second phase of the project provides another 63,000 square feet of educational and production space in four buildings. The project received the Grand Prize at the 2011 Los Angeles Architectural Awards awarded the honor by the Los Angeles Building Council (LABC) in 2011.

    The school is located at 900 W 34th Street in the West Adams neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Up de Graf House, Wallace Neff 1927
    Architect Wallace Neff designed the Up de Graf House in a Spanish Colonial Revival style. At the age of twenty-eight, Wallace Neff married Louise Up de Graf, a woman from his own social strata. Her brother, Thaddeus, left the company business (Libby, McNeilll & Libby) in 1924 to capitalize on the rapidly-growing Southern California land boom. His architect was his brother-in-law, Wallace Neff.

    The Up de Graf House is located at 1861 Lombardy Road in San Marino, California.
  • United University Church, USC, C. Raimond Johnson, Architect 1931
    Formerly Methodist Episcopal University Church, the architect designed this handsome church to compliment the other Romanesque buildings on the main campus of the University of Southern California. The church reminds us of the school's Methodist roots. Johnson also had a hand in designing the Beigler Hall of Engineering (in 1939, with architects John and Donald Parkinson) and the Hancock Foundation Building (with Samuel Lunden) in 1941.
  • United States Island 1905-1929
    Once an island, the tiny vacation rental houses that lay within the land between Windward Avenue, Altair Place and Cabrillo Avenue in Venice Beach, California, are a nostalgic reminder of Abbot Kinney's dream of transforming the community into a Venice of the West.
  • United California Bank, Bennett & Haskell 1929
    Architects Cyril Bennett and Fitch Haskell joined forces in 1923, designing many important Pasadena landmarks, including the Pasadena Civic Auditorium (1932), the Parish House and Rectory at All Saints Episcopal Church (1930) and the California State Armory (now the Armory Gallery, in 1932). Some sources claim that the building replaced an earlier structure designed by Dennis and Farwell in1901. When the street was widened In 1929, the bank’s frontage on Colorado Boulevard was cut back 14 feet, resulting in the elegant brick Art Deco façade seen today.
  • Union Station, John & Donald Parkinson, Architects
    Opened in May 1939, Union Station is known as the 'Last of the Great Railway Stations' built in the United States. Designed by by the father and son team of John Parkinson and Donald B. Parkinson, with the assitance of Architect Jan van der Linden and others.

    The architecture blends Spanish Mission and Art Deco styles in a harmonious mix. with the original light fixtures, inlaid stone floors, painted celings and tiled walls.
    The station has been featured in many films, including Blade Runner, Silver Streak and The Italian Job.

    Located at 800 N. Alameda Street east of downtown Los Angeles.
  • Ulm House, Milton Black (Architect) or William Kesling (Designer) 1937
    I suppose we'll never actually know for certain who designed the Ulm House: was it the distinguished architect Milton S. Black or the builder-designer William Kesling? Black and Kesling were both active in the neighborhood; Kesling completed the nearby Johnstone House, and Black, the Victor M. Carter Residence both in 1935.

    The original building permit does not list either the builder or architect; however the initials 'WPK' appear as a 'notation' according to Kesling biographer Patrick Pascal (ref. 'Kesling Modern Structures: Popularizing Modern Design in Southern California 1934-1962'). On the other hand, the eminent architectural historian Robert Winter attributes the design to Milton Black in his seminal book 'An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles'.

    Perhaps there will be a revelation of the truth one day; but for the moment, the Ulm House stands out as a beautiful example of the moderne/art deco that made both Black and Kesling synonymous with the style.

    The Ulm House is located at 3606 Amesbury Road in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.

  • U.S. Post Office, Glendale, CA, George M. Lindsay & James A. Wetmore, Architects 1933-34
    The Glendale Post Office is a collaboration between architects George Lindsay and James A. Wetmore. Lindsay previously designed the Collegiate Gothic Style John Marshall High School in Los Feliz (1931) and later the administration building of Glendale College (Glendale, CA in 1937). Wetmore was an established veteran architect of post offices, including ones in Clovis, NM, Provincetown, MA and Kansas City.

    The Italian Renaissance Style Glendale Post Office is located at 313 E. Broadway in Glendale, CA.
  • U.S. Post Office - Los Angeles Terminal Annex, Gilbert Stanley Underwood, Architect 1939-1940



    The Spanish Colonial-Mission Revival style building was designed by Architect Gilbert Stanley Underwood and constructed between 1939 and 1940. The architect selected a design that would harmonize with the adjacent art deco style Union Station. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1985. Located at 900 N. Alameda Street in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Trinity Lutheran Church, Frederick Kennedy, Architect 1927
    The English Gothic church was designed by Frederick Kennedy in 1927. Kennedy's other contributions include the Throop Memorial Unitarian-Universalist Church (1923) and the First Baptist Church of Pasadena (1926, with Carlton Winslow, Sr.). Located at 997 E. Walnut Street in Pasadena.
  • Trianon Apartments, Leland E. Bryant, Architect 1928
    Named after Marie Antoinette's 'Petit Trianon' (which it in no way resembles), the Trianon Apartments are a real crown jewel in an otherwise non-descript neighborhood of Hollywood. According to architecture historian Laura Massino-Smith, the apartments bear a strong resemblance to the Chateau d'Azay-le-Rideau in the Val de Loire. (I looked it up and they do!).

    The Trianon is designed in the French Normandy or Chateauesque style. The apartments and its neon roof sign were designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1995 (No. 616). Architect Bryant also designed the art deco style Argyle Hotel (Sunset Tower) in West Hollywood. The Trianon is located at 1750-1754 Serrano Avenue in Hollywood.
  • Toleston House, E. P. Zimmerman 1913
    Architect E.P. Zimmerman designed the Toleston House in a Colonial Georgian style with Federal and Dutch elements. The Toleston House is located at 965 S. Oakland Avenue in the posh Oak Knoll neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • Tito Schipo Residence, Arthur Kelly, Architect 1923
    English Tudor Revival style residence designed for Tito Schipo by architect Arthur Kelly in 1923. It was the home of Hollywood producer Herbert Leonard from the 1960s until his death in 2006. His credits include Naked City (1958); The Adventures of Rin Tin Tin (1954); Circus Boy (1956); and Route 66 (1960). His wife, Betty Kennedy, guest-starred in several episodes of his TV show, Rin Tin Tin and K-9 Cop. The architect began his architectural career working for Greene and Greene in Pasadena, later opening his own firm. He went on to design over 500 homes and buildings, including the Christie Hotel in Hollywood and the Arthur Letts, Jr. Estate (aka “The Playboy Mansion”). Located at 4956 Los Feliz Boulevard.
  • Title Guarantee & Trust Company, John & Donald Parkinson, 1931



    Although the catalog of buildings designed by the Parkinson firm demonstrates a diversity of architectural styles, most observers would agree that their greatest achievements focused on an moderne sensibility. Consider Los Angeles' art deco monuments of the first order (Memorial Coliseum, Union Station, City Hall, Bullock's Wilshire, for example) and you get the picture. The twelve story Title Guarantee & Trust Company is another fine example, combining ZigZag Moderne and Gothic elements.

    Located at 401-411 South Broadway in downtown Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 278) in 1984.
  • Timme Research Center, USC School of Architecture, Christoph Kapeller (CK Architecture) 2007
    A major expansion of the USC School of Architecture, consisting of a 23,00 sq. ft. addition, a third floor on top of Watt Hall, (designed by Hurst & Killingsworth) in time for the arrival of Quingyun Ma the architectural school's new dean. The school, which previously shared buildings with the department of Fine Arts, now has a definable center. The flexible floor plan is divided into three major zones, each wrapping around the other's perimeter: a central atrium connects the new floor with the floors below. The open atrium forms the physical center, surrounded by an open studio zone, providing a 'plug and play' learning and research environment. An outer zone consists of private study rooms and faculty offices.

    Noted Architectural Photographer Martin Schall accompanied me on a recent (October 2008) visit as guests of the architect. Kapeller is best known in architecture for his stunning design of the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, the National Library of Egypt in Alexandria. The award-winning design is a modern interpretation of the great Alexandria Library, the largest library of the ancient world.
  • Timme Graduate Research Center, Christoph Kapeller (CK- Architecture) 2007
    View from the west. The roof overhang above the clerestory windows was developed with intensive lighting simulation in order to prevent glare in a heavily computer oriented glare environment.
  • Tibbens-Long Mansion c.1906
    The Tibbens-Long Mansion was designed in a Tudor-Craftsman style in 1909. The restored arts and crafts mansion has seven bedrooms and four baths in 7,288 sq. ft. of living space.

    Located at 1415 South Manhattan Place in the Arlington Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Thomas Jefferson High School, Stiles O. Clements 1936
    Thomas Jefferson High School, locally referred to as simply Jefferson High School is the fourth oldest public high school in the Los Angeles Unified School District. was originally founded in 1916, it is the fourth oldest public high school in the Los Angeles Unified School District. After the original school was destroyed in the 1933 Long Beach Earthquake, architect Stiles O Clement was selected to design a new campus in the 'Streamline Moderne' style, completed in 1935. The school boasts distinguished alumni in the fields of musical entertainment, politics and sports, including Dorothy Dandridge, the first African American to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress, the movie was Carmen Jones; Nobel Peace Prize winner Ralph Bunche; singer-songwriter Richard Berry (composer of the hit song – 'Louie Louie' made popular by The Kingsmen); three original members of the Platters; and blues singer Etta James, remembered for the hit song, 'At last'. The school is located at 1319 E. 41st St., Los Angeles, CA 90011-3399.
  • Thomas Hunter Russell Residence, Joseph P. Rhodes, Architect 1923
    North Glendower Avenue in the foothills of Griffith Park is one of the loveliest streets in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles. The English Tudor style house at No. 2421 was originally designed for Theodore E. Hammond by architect-builder Joseph P. Rhodes in 1923. The 1930 census reports that Hammond was born in California and was Vice President of a stock and bond company. In the 1950s, Mrs. Gordon L. McFarland, an active member of the Los Feliz Woman's Club was the owner. In 1978, ownership of the house passed to prominent trial attorney, Thomas Hunter Russell. Tom was a personal friend who I met during his campaign for the California State Senate. We caught up years later after my wife and I became active in the First Congregational Church of Los Angeles, where Tom was a prominent member since the early 60s until his untimely passing on February 8, 2012. He will be greatly missed!
  • Thomas House, Sylvanus Marston 1911
    Architect Sylvanus Marston designed the Tudor Craftsman style residence in 1911. The house is a designated Pasadena Historic Landmark, listed in 1998. Located at 574 Bellefontaine Street in the historic Lower Arroyo Seco neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • Thomas Butler Henry Residence, Althouse Brothers 1911
    The Althouse Brothers designed the Mediterranean Colonial style residence for Thomas Butler Henry in 1911. Designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 625) in 1996. Located at 1400 South Manhattan Place in the Arlington Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Thirteen Church of Christ, Scientist, Allison & Allison, Architects 1926
    Designed by partners David Clark Allison and James Edward Allison in 1926, the classical Italian Renaissance Revival structure towers over the homes in a residential street in Los Feliz. The Allison partnership began in Pittsburgh, and moved to Los Angeles in 1910 and lasted until 1942 during which the pair designed many prominent California buildings, including the Wilshire Blvd. United Methodist Church (1924), First Unitarian Church of Los Angeles (1930), the Beverly Hills Main Post Office (1932-33), the UCLA Administration Building (1926 & 1937) and Kerckhoff Hall (1931) also at UCLA.

    In 1992, the church was designated an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles (No. 559). It is located at 1750 N. Edgemont Street in Los Feliz Village.
  • Thien Hau Temple Los Angeles c.2005
    Thien Hau is a Taoist temple, also known as Ch¨´a B¨¤ Thi¨ºn Hậu in Vietnamese and as Ti¨¡n H¨°u G¨­ng (Ììºó¹¬) in Chinese. The complex includes an ancestral memorial hall dedicated to the Bodhisattva Dizang. The temple is dedicated to Mazu, the Taoist goddess of the sea, Guan Yu, the god of wars, brotherhood, and righteousness, and Fu De, the god of the earth, wealth and merit. Guan Yin and Di Zang, bodhisattvas from the Buddhist faith also has their own shrine in the temple. Located at 750-756 North Yale Street in Old Chinatown Los Angeles, CA.



  • The Talmadge, Aleck Curlett & Claud Beelman 1923
    The Neoclassical Talmadge Apartments were financed by Silent Screen Star Norma Talmadge who also lived in the building, at least for a time. The building has been one of Los Angeles' premier addresses since it opened in 1923. Some of the apartments are over 3,000 square feet with up to eight bedrooms and have maids quarters.

    Located at 3278 Wilshire Boulevard.
  • The Promenade, Kamnitzer Cotton + Vreeland Architects 1980
    I have a two bedroom, two bath condominium for lease in this exceptionally well-maintained complex in the heart of Bunker Hill. The price: $2195.00 per month. Now its possible to experience the timeless elegance of the Promenade in the heart of Los Angeles' cultural district. Enjoy spectacular views of world famous Disney Concert Hall, Dorothy Chandler Concert Hall and the dramatic downtown skyline from the atrium-style living room and two separate balconies. The Promenade is a world-class complex with excellent management and services including 24-hour security and concierge; elegant lobby, pool, spa, high-tech gym and guest parking. The unit itself has been freshly painted and has new Berber carpeting and new air-conditioning. The en suite master bedroom features a large walk-in closet, private bath with vanity and its own private view balcony. Centrally located, your access to all that Downtown Los Angeles has to offer couldn't be more convenient!
  • The Pointe, HLW Architects 2009
    The modernist glass high-rise office building was designed by HLW Architects, completed in 2009. It is the new home of television station KCET, which moved out of its landmark facility on Sunset Boulevard in Silver Lake after it was purchased by the Church of Scientology. KCET will share the 'uber-enviromentally sustainable' facility with DC Comics and Warner Brothers.

    Located at 2900 West Alameda Blvd., Burbank, California.

  • The Metro @ Hollywood Senior Apartments, PSL Architects 2013
    The new senior housing project consists of 120 affordable apatment units and 6,000 square feet of retail space. A corner tower and façade finished with faceted glazing represents a dramatic turnaround for a once-blighted neighborhood that now boasts a Metro station (corner of Western and Hollywood Boulevard), a shopping center and other signs of new life. The project expects to achieve LEED Silver Certification after completion, scheduled for January 2013.

    The Metro @ Hollywood is located at 5555 Hollywood Blvd in the Thai Town neighborhood of Los Angeles, California.
  • The Mauretania, Milton J. Black, Architect 1934
    A gem of the Streamline Moderne Style, the Mauretania was designed for actor Jack Haley (the 'Tin Man' in 'The Wizard of Oz') and his wife Flo. The pair lived in the penthouse apartment for twenty years. The rounded exterior walls and second floor balconies with railings suggest a luxury ocean-going liner.

    During the summer of 1960, Senator John F. Kennedy occupied the penthouse during the Democratic National Convention.

    The Mauretania is located at 520-522 N. Rossmore Avenue in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Terner Residence, Barry A. Berkus, B3 Architects 1997
    Honored as 'One of the World's 100 Best Homes' by Architectural Review Editor Catherine Slessor, the Terner Residence was designed by Barry Berkus, founder of B3 Architects in 1997.

    Located immediately next door to the Eames House and built behind Case Sudy House No. 9 (designed by Charles Eames and Earo Saarinen), the new residence has been configured to compliment the older one, incorporating cubist forms.

    Situated in a spectacular setting overlooking the Pacific Ocean, the Terner Residence is a great addition to the colony of Case Study homes in the immediate vicinity.

    The Terner Residence is located at 205 Chautauqua Blvd. in Pacific Palisades.
  • Tattuplex, Tom Marble (Marbletecture) 2013
    Yesterday I had the pleasure of meeting architect Tom Marble at the 'Tattuplex', an unconventional living compound destined to become a Silver Lake classic. I was met at the project by Marble and colleague Vincent Pocsik for a tour of the property which has just been completed, save for landscaping and a potential yet-to-be realized 'water feature' or possible 'plunge' . Designed for Tim Tattu, a Zen Buddhist nurse to be a 'place for community and celebration as well as reflection and recuperation' who sought to combine complexity of space with simplicity of materials, creating a strong indoor-outdoor connection- 'rooms filled with light and air'- and provide a continuous ambulatory for meditative walks.
    The project became an experiment to test the available prefab technologies to see how far it could be pushed to achieve a more exciting design while retaining its ecological and economic benefits. 'The promise of Prefab was to offer a sustainable approach to housing at a modest price. Working with steel prefabricator Ecosteel, we deployed a three-axis, equilateral grid to accommodate a 1,100 square-foot one-bedroom unit below and a 600 square-foot studio above for this kit-of-parts duplex. Modest moves - like rotating the plan twelve degrees and by using pop-outs where it made sense - increased the livability of the spaces while establishing axes that opened up a multiplicity of views unavailable otherwise.
    For the construction we took common, everyday materials and methods and pushed them, first by imposing the hexagonal order upon the typically rectilinear technologies of board-formed concrete and red steel, which then prompted the modification of virtually every other element - from the plumbing and mechanical systems, to the built-in cabinetry, to the off-the shelf steel stairs - standard systems all adapting to the rigors of the 60-degree geometry'. For the client, the experiment turned out to be a huge success. But it also suggests an alternative future for Prefab: less as a consumer product to be plopped down anywhere for anyone, and more as a kit-of-parts system as adaptable to the site and to the user as the imagination allows'.


    After earning architecture degrees from UC Berkeley and Yale, Tom Marble went on to design for the firms SOM and Morphosis, Rios Associates and The Irvine Company. He started his own firm, Marbletecture in 2001. Since then he has completed dozens of projects ranging from furniture design to public art, assisting his partner, Pae White, with a series of large-scale commissions. He has also been committed to research, probing the often antagonistic relationship of people to place, first through 'Twelve Minutes with Frank & Dolores' a short film he presented at the 1989 Monterey Design Conference, then in articles for trade journals, and later in book form with After the city this (is how we live) published by the Los Angeles Forum for Architecture and Urban Design in 2008. Tom is currently working on The Expediter, an architectural film noir exploring the role of real estate development in the formation of contemporary Los Angeles. He has taught at USC, Cal Poly Pomona, and SCI-Arc and has been a visiting critic at those schools as well as UCLA and Woodbury. He taught a community-based urban studio, Urban Successionism in Colorado Springs, at Colorado College in the Spring of 2012 and is currently teaching a class, Scripted Spaces, with Norman Klein at Woodbury. He is currently the Vice-Chair of the Debs Park Advisory Board in Northeast Los Angeles and is a former President of the Arroyo Seco Neighborhood Council. He served on the board of the Los Angeles Forum for Architecture and Urban Design from 2002-07.


  • Taggart House, Lloyd Wright, Architect 1922-24, Eric Lloyd Wright (Remodel) 2006
    Lloyd Wright designed his first important house for the mother of his second wife, actress Helen Taggert. The house and gardens showcase the architect's emphasis on the dramatic: the minutely worked out arrangement of house and garden on a hillside lot overlooking Fern Dell Park is simply stunning. A distinctive art deco motif incorporates geometric forms, horizontal banding and an elaborate art-glass window on the south elevation.

    In 2006, Lloyd Wright's son, Eric Lloyd Wright completed an extensive restoration of the house, honored by the Los Feliz Improvement Association's Meliora Award for Best Restoration of a Single Family Home in 2006.

    The Taggart House is located at 2158 Live Oak Drive in Los Feliz.
  • Taggart House, Frank Lloyd Wright, Jr. Architect 1922; Eric Lloyd Wright (Remodel ) 2006
    Lloyd Wright's design for his mother-in-law, Helen Taggart, was his first commission. The property was listed for sale in November 2009 for $3.25M; as of January 26, 2010, the selling price is $2,595,000. The architect's son, Eric Lloyd Wright lead an award-winning restoration effort, completed in 2006.

    The house is located at 5423 Black Oak Drive in the Los Feliz Oaks neighborhood of Los Angeles. (I suppose I should take it as a compliment; the agent who has the listing on the property used my exact words to describe the property in the MLS, except for misspelling the name!)
  • Susana Machado Bernard Residence, John B. Parkinson, Architect 1902
    The last time I tried to find this home a month or so ago, I was rerouted by police activity within the surrounding blocks, an indication that I might be heading into a rough neighborhood. This past Sunday, September 23, 2007 on my 64th birthday, my agreeable wife asked me, 'How would you like to spend your day?', to which I replied, 'Let's go out and explore Los Angeles!'. I was hoping to visit and take pictures of some of the magnificent old homes and churches(one of my favorite pastimes), in this instance, between Silver Lake and the University of Southern California. I had in mind the Susana Machado Bernard Residence; I had seen a picture of the house in 'Landmark L.A.', a guidebook to the historic-cultural monuments in Los Angeles, and was intrigued by the great beauty of the architecture.

    I was not disappointed! The elegant old home still impresses, even though the surrounding neighborhood has changed dramatically since its heyday in the early 20th century. The property was purchased in 1995 by the Center for Human Rights & Constitutional Law, a non-profit, public interest legal foundation dedicated to furthuring and protecting the civil, constitutional and human rights of immigrants, refugees, children and the poor. The 10,032 sq. ft. mansion and carriage house is operated as a homeless shelter.

    The Susana Machado Bernard Residence is located at 845 South Lake Street in the Lake Shore subdivision of West Adams. In 1979, it was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 208).
  • Superior Court Tower, Langdon and Wilson Architects 1972








    Originally designed for CNA Insurance by Landgon and Wilson Architects and landscape design by Emmet L. Wemple and Associates in 1972. The design features granite panels that rise from the plaza in a series of waves that give the appearance of holding up the tower above. The liquid forms of the space at street level contrast sharply with the strict geometry of the tower itself.

    The firm also designed the J. Paul Getty Museum (now Getty Villa) in Pacific Palisades in 1974. Located at 6th and Commonwealth in the Westlake district of Los Angeles.
  • Sunset Vine Tower, Kanner Architects 2011
    The Sunset Vine Tower is a re-design of an existing 22-story office building, converting it into a 63-unit apartment building, completed in 2011. The building, Hollywood's tallest has a sleek, modern look with full height glass, large balconies, open floor plans and high ceilings and incredible views in every directions.
  • Sunset Tower, Leland A. Bryant 1931
    Sunset Tower, previously known as The St. James's Club, The Argyle, and The Sunset Tower Hotel, is a historic hotel designed by architect Leland A. Bryant in 1929. It is considered one of the finest examples of Zig Zag Moderne Art Deco architecture in the world. It has had several incarnations as a luxury hotel, including the St. James Club, the Argyle and most recently, the Sunset Tower. John Wayne, Howard Hughes, Frank Sinatra, Lakers owner Jerry Buss, Clark Gable, Errol Flynn, Marilyn Monroe, Michael Caine, Quincy Jones, Roger Moore, and Zsa Zsa Gabor have lived at the luxury hotel at various times during their careers.

    The Sunset Tower is located at 8358 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood, California. The building was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.
  • Sunset & Vine Mixed-Use Project, Roschen Van Cleve Architects + Nakada Partners 2004
    Occupying a full city block, the mixed-use Sunset & Vine complex has transformed a lackluster corner of Hollywood into a vibrant place where people live and tourist come to visit.
  • Subway Terminal Building, Schultze & Weaver 1926, Restoration, Brenda Levin & Associates 1986



    The only subway terminal building in downtown Los Angeles, the Beaux Arts structure served passengers of the Pacific Electric Railway; carrying 65,000 passengers on 844 trains daily at its peak in 1944. If you walk around the corner and take a gander at the Biltmore Hotel you will notice some striking similarities. Designed by the same architectural firm, the two buildings are based upon a 16th century Italian model, with four bay sections. The ambiance of the two, however are worlds apart; the Subway Terminal Building is surrounded by parking lots while the Biltmore continues to shine as one of Los Angeles' premiere hotels.

    Located at 417 South Hill Street in downtown Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1977 (No. 177).
  • Sturges House, Frank Lloyd Wright 1939
    The influence of architect John Lautner is strongly suggested in the house Frank Lloyd Wright designed for George Sturges in 1939. Wright had hired Taliesin fellow John Lautner to oversee its construction while Wright was away working on other projects. The single story concrete, steel, brick and redwood house is only 1200 sq. ft., however a panoramic 21' deck adds to a sense of spaciousness. The Usonian design of the Sturgess House is a departure in style from Wright's 'textile block' California houses. The house was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 577) in 1993. Located at 449 N. Skyewiay Road in the Brentwood Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • Stuart Pharmaceutical Company, Edward D. Stone Architect; Thomas D. Church, Landscape Architect 1957
    Considered one of Stone's best designs; the other is the American Embassy in New Delhi, India. The building fell on hard times in recent years; it is currently (Fall 2010) being re-purposed as an upscale apartment complex. Located at 3300 East Foothill Boulevard in Pasadena.
  • Strick House, Oscar Niemeyer 1964
    Famed Brazilian Architect Oscar Niemeyer (1907-) designed the Strick House in 1964, it is the only residential project by the architect in the United States. The only other realized Niemeyer project in North America is the United Nations headquarters in New York, designed in collaboraton with Wallace K. Harrison and Le Corbusier. The house is a Santa Monica City Landmark, designated in 2003. Niemeyer established himself as one of Modernism's most important contributors as the principal architect of Brasilia. Located at 1911 La Mesa Drive.
  • Stoutenburgh House, Thomas Fellows, Architect 1893
    The Queen Anne-Eastlake Victorian Stoutenburgh House was designed by Thomas Fellows in 1893. The house is part of the South Marengo Historic District and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Located at 255 S. Marengo Avenue in Pasadena, California.

  • Stimson Residence, Carroll H. Brown, Architect, 1891
    Architect H.H. Richardson originated the 'Richardsonian Romanesque Style. He was only the second American, after Richard Morris Hunt, to graduate from the Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris. His first important commission was the rebuilding of Trinity Church in Boston, MA after it had been destroyed by the Great Boston Fire in 1872. The style is seen infrequently on the West Coast, however, many important public buildings remain, a testament to their timeless beauty and the quality of materials used.

    The Stimson Residence, located at 2421 South Figueroa Street in the West Adams district, was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1979 (No. 212).
  • Staples Center, NBBJ Architects 1999
    Completed in 1999 at a cost of $375 Million, the Staples Center is the centerpiece of L.A.Live, the entertainment complex currently under development by the Anschutz Entertainment Group. The center is the only sports venue that is home to five professional sports franchises, the Los Angeles Lakers, Los Angeles Clippers, Los Angeles Kings (NHL), Los Angeles Sparks (WNBA), Los Angeles Avengers (Arena Football League). The venue hosts 250 events and nearly 4 million visitors a year. Statues of hockey star Wayne Gretsky and basketball great Magic Johnson are located at the arena's entrance.

    Staples Center is located in downtown Los Angeles at 1111 S. Figueroa Street.
  • St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church, Albert C. Martin, Architect 1924
    Arguably one of the most beautiful churches to be found in the City of the Angels, the church was designed and built by the distinguished firm of Albert C. Martin in 1923-25. The church has influences of the Spanish Renaissance and Mission Style, as well as elements of the Churrigueresque found in Colonial Mexico.
    The church is reminiscent of the classical California Building in San Diego's famed Balboa Park, built for the 1915 Exposition by Bertram G. Goodhue. Other outstanding features of the church are a tile dome in vibrant colors and John B. Smeraldi's ceiling decorations.

    The church is located at the intersection of Figueroa Street and West Adams Blvd. in the historic West Adams district of Los Angeles. It was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1971 (No. 90).
  • St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church, 1924, Albert C. Martin, Architect
    The beauty of this great church is not limited to the exterior as can be seen in this photograph of the main sanctuary.
  • St. Peters Italian Catholic Church, Armand Monaco, Architect 1947
    Architect Armand Monaco designed the Spanish Revival style church in 1947; it was his last known commission. Armand was a young boy when his parents immigrated from Italy in 1907 along with four other siblings, settling in Chicago. After graduation from Northwestern University, he served as Principal Designer in the Chicago architectural office of Jarvis Hunt. His name first appears in Los Angeles in 1921 when he worked as a designer in the offices of Robert D. Farquhar and Myron Hunt. In the same year he formed a partnership with William Bordeaux which lasted until 1926. Monaco & Bordeaux designed several Italianate style residences for wealthy clients during their partnership, including a home for actress Betty Blythe in Los Feliz and the Villa Monaco in Silver Lake, both in 1921 where Armand lived until 1965. After the partnership dissolved in 1927, Monaco continued to work, designing the original French Hospital in Chinatown (now the Pacific Alliance Medical Center) in 1927 and the Haggerty House in Palos Verdes Estates (now the Neighborhood Church, 415 Paseo Del Mar) in 1928. His last project was the design for St. Peters Italian Catholic Church located at 1039 N. Broadway in 1947 (the design is similar to the Haggerty House built 20 years earlier). He died in Los Angeles on August 13, 1989.

    Located at 3021 Waverly Drive.1039 North Broadway in Los Angeles, California.

    Thanks to Historian Helene Demeestere www.HistoricallyCorrect.com who helped me discover the architecture of Armand Monaco during her research on the French Hospital.
  • St. Peter's Italian Catholic Church, Armand Monaco, Architect 1947
    Architect Armand Monaco designed the Spanish Revival style church in 1947; it was his last known commission. Armand was a young boy when his parents immigrated from Italy in 1907 along with four other siblings, settling in Chicago. After graduation from Northwestern University, he served as Principal Designer in the Chicago architectural office of Jarvis Hunt. His name first appears in Los Angeles in 1921 when he worked as a designer in the offices of Robert D. Farquhar and Myron Hunt. In the same year he formed a partnership with William Bordeaux which lasted until 1926. Monaco & Bordeaux designed several Italianate style residences for wealthy clients during their partnership, including a home for actress Betty Blythe in Los Feliz and the Villa Monaco in Silver Lake, both in 1921 where Armand lived until 1965. After the partnership dissolved in 1927, Monaco continued to work, designing the original French Hospital in Chinatown (now the Pacific Alliance Medical Center) in 1927 and the Haggerty House in Palos Verdes Estates (now the Neighborhood Church, 415 Paseo Del Mar) in 1928. His last project was the design for St. Peters Italian Catholic Church located at 1039 N. Broadway in 1947 (the design is similar to the Haggerty House built 20 years earlier). He died in Los Angeles on August 13, 1989.

    Located at 3021 Waverly Drive.1039 North Broadway in Los Angeles, California.

    Thanks to Historian Helene Demeestere www.HistoricallyCorrect.com who helped me discover the architecture of Armand Monaco during her research on the French Hospital.
  • St. Mary of the Angels Anglican Church, Carlton Winslow, Architect 1930

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    Founded in 1919 as an Anglo-Catholic parish in the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles to 'address the spiritual needs of the fledging Hollywood motion picture community.' Father Neal Dodd was the Founding Rector. The present building was completed in 1930 in the style of the Italian Renaissance. The alter consists of bas-relief sculptures in the style of Andrea Della Robbia, the art of glazed terracotta popularized in 15th century Florence.

    St. Mary of the Angels Anglican Church is located in Los Feliz Village at 4510 Finley Avenue. It was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in December 1974 (No. 136).
  • St. Mark's Episcopal Church- Carleton M. Winslow, Architect 1948
    St. Mark's Episcopal Church ranks as my favorite of Glendale's many fine churches. Designed by Carleton M. Winslow, the handsome edifice is constructed of poured concrete in a rich Gothic style. More recently, the altar and ceiling were redesigned by church architect Rhett Judice. The stained glass windows were executed by Judson Studios; the chapel windows are dedicated to the U.S. Armed Forces of World War II; the north side windows show scenes from the ministry of Christ; the southern clerestory windows are dedicated to the major events in his life (Annunciation, Nativity, Baptism, and Transfiguration); the northern windows illustrate scenes of Christ as healer, storyteller, the Last Supper and Crucifixion.

    St. Mark's Episcopal Church is located at 1020 North Brand Blvd. in Glendale, CA.
  • St. Mark's Episcopal Church- Carleton M. Winslow, Architect 1948
    The stunning beauty of its sanctuary illlustrates the glory of St. Mark's Episcopal Church in Glendale, CA.
  • St. Luke's Hospital, Gene Verge, Architect 1933
    St. Luke's Hospital of the Sisters of St. Joseph was built in 1933 to serve the medical needs of north Pasadena until closing in 2002. The hospital building is one of the most impressive art deco landmarks in the San Gabriel Valley. In 2003, St. Luke's was sold to Cal Tech with the promise of using the facility for research and education. The location proved too remote from Cal Tech's main campus and the property was put up for sale. According to an October 2007, Los Angeles Business Journal article, Cal Tech paid less than $20 million for the property in 2003.. Four years later, it sold the property to Beverly Hills developer DS Ventures for more than $40 million.

    The hospital is a designated Pasadena Historic Landmark located at 2632 E, Washington Boulevard in Pasadena, California.




  • St. Luke of the Mountains, S. Seymour Thomas & Harry Peters 1924
    The picturesque boulder church came from the inspiration of a sketch by plein air painter S. Seymour Thomas; in 1924 architect Harry Peters drew up actual plans for the church's construction. Located at 2563 Foothill Blvd. in La Crescenta, CA 91214
  • St. Leon Armenian Cathedral est.2010
    The Armenian Cathedral was consecrated on September 10-12, 2010 by His Holiness Karekin II, Supreme Patriarch and Catholicos of All Armenians at the invitation of the Primate of the Western Diocese, His Eminence Archbishop Hovnan Derderian and the Diocesan Council. On Sunday, September 12th, the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross with the Pontifical Divine Liturgy took place in the newly consecrated Cathedral, with His Holiness offering a spiritual message to the faithful.

    The Cathedral is located at 3325 N. Glenoaks Blvd. in Burbank
    California.
  • St. Jerome Roman Catholic Church, Hugh Kinsler, Architect 1949
    St. Jerome Roman Catholic Church honors Eusebius Hieronymous Sophronius, later called Jerome, the translator of the Bible from Hebrew and Greek into Latin, the common language who died in 420 A.D..

    St. Jerome is the patron saint of librarians, scholars, and students. The church that bears his name was designed by the architect as a 16-sided santuary that draws the assembly closer to the altar, and topped by a dramatic, folded-plate-style roof. The church could be described as “part spaceship, part starburst”. If you have the opportunity to visit the architect's Vallejo Drive Seventh Day Adventist Church in Glendale, California or the Community of Christ Church in San Jose both designed by Kinsler in 1967 you will note a striking similarity of style. Located at 5550 Thornburn Street in the Westchester neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • St. James Episcopal Church, Benjamin G. McDougall 1925
    The Gothic Revival style church was designed by architect Benjamin G. McDougall in 1925. I attempted to take a photo of the beautiful sanctuary however a security guard caught me in the act! The stained glass windows designed by the Judson Studios are sublime.

    Located at 3900 Wilshire Boulevard. Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • St. Gregory the Illuminator Armenian Catholic Church, Alajajian Marcoosi Architects 1999-2002
    The church was designed by the architectural firm, Alajajian Marcoosi between 1999 and 2002, with Aram Alajajian acting as lead architect. The church honors St. Gregory the Illuminator, the Patron Saint of Armenia, credited with convincing King Tiridates III (Trdat) to convert to Christianity in 303 A.D., establishing Armenia as the first State to adopt the faith.

    The church is built upon another church site that was no longer serving a congregation. Plans were drawn up to enlarge the sanctuary, improving the site lines to the altar, adding the belltowers and administrative offices. Stone imported from mountain quarries above Malula, Syria were used extensively in the construction. (according to Armenian Catholic tradition, Jesus prayed at an altar in present day Malula).

    The church was consecrated in April 2001. The service was attended by Cardinal Renato Martino, President of the Pontificial Council for Justice and Peace, and the Permanent Observer for the Holy See to the United Nations. The church is located at 1510 E. Mountain St. in Glendale.
  • St. Eleanor's Hall, Bellarmine-Jefferson High School Auditorium, Barker & Ott Architects 1952
    Bellarmine-Jefferson High School is a Catholic high school founded by Monsignor Martin Cody Keating in 1944. The school name honors St. Robert Bellarmine, a 17th century Italian Jesuit priest and President Thomas Jefferson. The school's auditorium, St. Eleanor's Hall, is a replica of the main library at the University of Virginia, designed by Thomas Jefferson. The main entrance has 13 steps, representing the original 13 colonies in the order they became states by ratifying the U.S. Constitution. Located at 465 East Olive Avenue in Burbank, California.
  • St. Cecilia's Roman Catholic Church, Ross Montgomery, Architect 1927
    A handsome Italian Romanesque style church in the West Adams district, St. Cecilia's is the work of architect Ross Montgomery, best known for the design of St. Anthony's Roman Catholic Church in Old Town Pasadena. Other ecclessiastical works by Montgomery include the Chapel of St. Vibiana (West Los Angeles), the Mausoleum of the Golden West (Inglewood), Saint Therese of Lisieux Parish Church (Alhambra), Calvary Cemetary Chapel (East Los Angeles) and the restoration of Mission Santa Barbara, after it was damaged by an earthquake in 1925.

    St. Cecilia's Roman Catholic Church is located at 4230 S. Normandie Avenue in the West Adams District of Los Angeles.
  • St. Brendan's Church, Emmett Martin, Architect 1927








    St. Brendan's Catholic Church was designed in the French Gothic style by Emmett Martin, of the famied Albert C. Martin family of architects, in 1927. The architect was educated in France after serving in World War I, which may have influenced the choice of style.

    Located at 300 South Van Ness Avenue in the Windsor Square section of Hancock Park.
  • St. Basil's Roman Catholic Church, Albert C. Martin & Associates, Architects 1974
    The Wilshire Corridor has some of the most imposing church architecture to be found in the City of the Angels. One of the newest among them, St. Basil's Roman Catholic Church, built in 1974, reminds me of the first time I saw the little town of San Gimignano in Tuscany with its many towers. Gebhard & Winter, in their must-read book, 'An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles' refer to the church as a 'forest of vertical concrete volumes'. Inside, the church is wonderfully dark and serene. Sensitively placed stained glass window allow prisms of light to cast rainbows of radiance in the voluminous sanctuary.
  • St. Basil's Roman Catholic Church, Albert C. Martin & Associates, Architects 1974
    Interior view demonstrating the special quality of the light in the sanctuary.
  • St. Andrew's Ukranian Orthodox Church
    Fleeing persecution from Nazis and Communists near the end of World War II, St. Andrews Church in Echo Park was build almost entirely by refugees from the Ukraine. The small congregation of 85 families purchased a run-down mansion on Sutherland Street for $20,000 in 1957; the current structure with the fancy domes was not completed until the 1980s.

    St. Andrews Church is located at 1456 Sutherland Street in Echo Park. Perched on a high hill overlooking Elysian Park, it can be seen for miles around.
  • St. Andrew's Roman Catholic Church, Ross Montgomery, Architect 1927
    One of Pasadena's great landmarks, St. Andrew's Catholic Church is the oldest Catholic parish in Pasadena (founded in the 1880s) and one of the oldest in Los Angeles County. The current church was built in 1927, however it took eight years to complete the interior decoration. Carlo Wostry painted for the murals and stations of the cross, The church was modeled after the Basilica of St. Sabina in Rome. The Romanesque campanile bell tower may be seen from miles around, Located at 311 N. Raymond Avenue.
  • Spiller House & Studio, Frank O. Gehry & Associates 1980
    I was only able to get a peak of the corrugated metal house built along one of the narrow streets just off the boardwalk in Venice Beach, California.

    Located at 39 Horizon Street in Venice Beach, California.
  • Speirs House, Hunt & Grey 1904
    The Dutch Colonial Revival style house was designed by architects Myron Hunt and Elmer Grey in 1904. Located at 230 North Grand Avenue in the Upper Arroyo Seco neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • Sparkletts Drinking Water Corporation, 1925-29
    Robert Winter and David Gebhard, in their definite work about L.A. Architecture 'An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles', cleverly describe the Sparkletts Drinking Water Company in Eagle Rock as a mosque of the first water'. The Moorish style architecture is attributed to a 'Mr. King'. The 1971 Sylmar Earthquake nearly toppled its minarets; they were removed and have not been replaced.

    The Sparkletts Drinking Water Corporation building is located at 4500 Lincoln Avenue in Eagle Rock.
  • Spadena House, Henry Oliver, Designer 1921
    A marvel of eccentric 'Storybook' style, the Spadena House was originally designed as a movie set and office for Irvin V. Willsit Productions in Culver City. The house has been preserved and now sits on a lovely street in Beverly Hills at the corner of Walden and Carmelita Drive.
  • Sowden House, Frank Lloyd Wright, Jr. 1927 & Xorin Balbes, Restoration, 2001
    Visiting Sowden House in Los Feliz is an enchanting experience. As a volunteer-docent for the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy 2005 Home Tour, I was invited to attend a 'Volunteer Appreciation Event' at this fabulous home by the Conservancy's 2005 Conference Co-Chairs, Scott Crawford (of Silver Lake), Deborah Vick, and Larry Woodin.

    Built by Lloyd Wright, the son of Frank Lloyd Wright in 1926-27, the Sowden House has been re-imagined by Designer Xorin Balbes (Temple Home) whose firm specialized in the restoration of old historic homes. The home has the look of an ancient temple which one may have just stumbled upon on a foray into a jungle. Temple Home's transformation is nothing short of magical, bringing a sensual vitality to this long-neglected landmark.

    The Sowden House is located at 5121 Franklin Avenue in the Los Feliz area of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 2003 (No. 762)
  • Southern California Edison Building, Austin Whittlesey, Allison & Allison Architects 1930-34

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    The Southern California Edison Building is an engineering marvel! The first all-electric building in Los Angeles, it is also one of the first to be built earthquake-proof. The art deco design features three Merrell Gage-designed relief panels over the entrance: 'Hydro Electric Energy', 'Light', and 'Power'. A mural entitled, 'Apothesis of Power' by Hugo Ballin graces the interior.

    The building is currently designated the 'One Bunker Hill' building. Located at 601 West 5th Street in downtown Los Angeles. Designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1998 (No. 347).
  • South Pasadena High School, Marsh, Smith & Powell 1937
    Classic PWA Moderne style, designed by Marsh, Smith & Powell in 1937. A walk around the campus reveals a cohesive design statement: concrete benches in the courtyard are set in a zig-zag pattern; even the hedges are trimmed the same way!

    The school has a number of well-known alumni, including actor William Holden, actress Hilary Swank and politician Mary Bono Mack. The school is located at 1401 Fremont Avenue in South Pasadena.
  • Sony Pictures Plaza, Maxwell Starkman & Associates 1986
    Filmland Corporate Center, now called the Sony Pictures Plaza was designed by Los Angeles-based architect Maxwell Starkman in 1986. The architect, best known for his design of the Simon Wiesenthal Center Museum of Tolerance, began his career building tract homes for the post-World War II Southern California housing boom. His gift for drawing was encouraged at an early age. He went on to study art at Central Technical School during which time he was offered a job with one of Toronto's leading architectural firms, Kaplan and Sprachman. With the outbreak of World War II, He joined the Royal Canadian Engineers and was posted to London.


    When the war ended, Starkman returned home, graduating with honors from the University of Manitoba. A short time afterwards, he accepted a position in the office of Modernist Architect Richard Neutra in Los Angeles. It didn't take long for him to recognize the commercial possibilities in booming Los Angeles; in a short period of time he left Neutra to start up his own firm. Espousing 'architecture for investment' — combining design and construction to complete projects quickly and return speedy profits to investors, he designed more than 20,000 single-family homes and thousands of apartment projects, pioneered shopping centers, office buildings, luxury condominiums, hotels and mixed-use projects including.he Dunes hotel tower on the Las Vegas Strip where the Bellagio now stands and the Mirabella Condominiums in the Wilshire Corridor. By 1983 Maxwell Starkman & Associates was ranked as the fourth largest architectural firm in the U.S.

    The dramatic, cantilevered building was the headquarters of Wolfram & Hart, the demonic law firm featured in the television show, 'Angel'. Located at 10202 W. Washington Boulevard in Culver City, California.













  • Snow White's Cottage- architect unknown 1936
    Known affectionately as 'Snow White's Cottage' (due in part to its proximity to the original Disney Studios), this handsome English Tudor home is located just across the street from the courtyard popularized as 'The House of the Seven Dwarfs' (See detailed on this webpage). Snow White's Cottage is located at 3141 Griffith Park Blvd. in Los Feliz.
  • Smith House, David A. Ogilvie, Architect 1929
    David Ogilvie designed several houses in Pasadena in the late twenties; all would seem to be in the English Tudor style, perhaps suggesting a carryover influence from Clan Ogilvy of Scottish Highlands fame.

    The Smith House is typical of Ogilvie's work, located at 181 La Vereda Road in the Upper Arroyo neighborhood of Pasadena.
  • Singleton House, R. Neutra, Architect 1959; Tim Campbell (Remodel) 2008
    Originally designed for Dr. and Mrs. Henry Singleton, the dynamic inventor-engineer and co-founder of Teledyne (in 1960). During his 30-year tenure at Teledyne, the company experienced a 25% growth rate per year over a twenty-five year period. In the Singleton House, the architect has fashioned a sophisticated, relaxing home that is in complete harmony with the site on a hilltop in Bel Air, at the end of a long, private drive. The home underwent extensive renovation and expansion under the supervison of Architectural Designer Tim Campbell in 2008 for Beverly Sassoon, and is currently for sale (June 2008, listed price: approximately $19M).

    The Singleton House is located in the Bel Air community of Los Angeles, 15000 Mulholland Drive.
  • Sierra Bonita Apartments, Tighe Architecture 2010
    The high design Sierra Bonita Apartments were designed by Tighe Architecture for the West Hollywood Community Housing Corporation(W HCHC) to provide affordable housing for people with limited resources, including people with special needs, HIV/AIDs or other long-term chronic health conditions. The 5-story mixed-use building provides offices for the WHCHC on the ground floor and affordable residential units above. Despite their small size, the complex attracted the interest of 3,000 applicants when they became available in 2008.

    Located at 7530 Santa Monica Boulevard in the City of West Hollywood, California.
  • Shulman House & Studio, Raphael Soriano, Architect 1950
    As the most prominent architectural photographer of the past seventy years, Julius Shulman has worked with nearly every important architect beginning with Richard Neutra (Kun House, 1938). In fact it was Neutra that launched Shulman's career, by introducing him to the leading architects of the day. In Neutra's protege, Raphael Soriano, Julius found a gifted architect that was perhaps more flexible than his mentor, easily incorporating Shulman's strong design preferences.

    The steel and glass house is still occupied by Shulman, still going strong at age 98 (October 10, 2010, he will celebrate his 100th birthday). The famed photographer keeps a full schedule, lecturing and teaching, and much in demand for his photographic skills.

    The Shulman House is located at 7875 Woodrow Wilson Drive in the Hollywood Hills. It was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1987 (No. 325)
  • Shrine Auditorium, G.A. Lansburgh, A.M. Edelman, & John C. Austin Architects, 1925-6
    Built in 1925-6, the Shrine Auditorium was the largest theatre building constructed in its time. The main architect, Albert Lansburgh, also designed the landmark Wiltern Theatre in Mid-Wilshire and the recently-renovated El Capitan Theatre in Hollywood. The building was designed in the Spanish Colonial Revival Style with Moorish details, to reflect the culture of the Shriner organization. Prior to the completion of the Music Center in downtown Los Angeles (and later the Los Angeles Convention Center and the Kodak Theatre in Hollywood), it was the preeminent concert and convention hall in the city. It was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1975 (No. 139).
  • Sherwood House, Charles M. Hutchinson, Architect 1929

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    English Tudor (and other Northern European-influenced styles) were all the rage in Los Angeles of the Roaring 20's, especially among the well-to-do; in later years more modest versions of the style emerged. Examples of the style abound in the Los Feliz district; Walt Disney's home on Woking Way and the 'House of the Seven Dwarves' and 'Snow White's Cottage' on Griffith Park Boulevard are well-known examples. The Sherwood House is located at 3435 Amesbury Road.
  • Sherwood House, Ben Sherwood. Builder 1938
    The intersection of Griffith Park and Rowena Avenue might well be called the "Storybook Corner" of Los Feliz; Builder Ben Sherwood also designed the nearby 'House of the Seven Dwarves' (2900-2912 1/2 Griffith Park Blvd.). The equally famous 'Snow White's Cottage' is located diagonally across the street.

    The Norman 'castle'' is located at 3212 Griffith Park Blvd.
  • Sherwood Apartments, Ben Sherwood, Builder 1931
    The intersection of Griffith Park and Rowena Avenue might well be called the 'Storybook Corner' of Los Feliz; Builder Ben Sherwood also designed the nearby Sherwood House' and the 'House of the Seven Dwarves' (2900-2912 1/2 Griffith Park Blvd.). The equally famous 'Snow White's Cottage' is located diagonally across the street.

    Located at 3437 Rowena Avenue, part of a five unit apartment complex between 3429 and 3437 Rowena Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Sheraton Town House, Norman Alpaugh, Architect 1929








    Designed by Norman W. Alpaugh, the building was once among the most luxurious hotels in Southern California. When the surrounding area became less desirable beginning in the 1960s,
    it was converted to low income housing in 1997.
    The Town House is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and is a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 576). Located at 2959-2973 Wilshire Boulevard in the Westlake neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Sheats-Goldstein House, John Lautner 1963-1980
    The architect designed the house originally for Dr. Paul Sheeas, his wife Artist Helen Sheats and their five children. After two years and a divorce, the house was subsequently purchased by two other owners, before being purchased by its current owner, James Goldstein. Lautner and Goldstein continued the process of re-inventing the house up until the time of the architect's death in 1994. The house was a highlight of the John Lautner Foundation House Tour, commemorating the architect's 100th Birthday, July 23, 2011.
  • Shapoory House, Amir Farr 1972
    Architect Amir Farr designed the house for the Shapoory family in 1972. The architect was a colleague of Oscar Niemeyer, the famed architect who designed the capital city of Brasilia as well as the co-architect of the United Nations complex in New York City. The house is on the market (August 2012) and listed for sale for $4,095,000. According to the listing, '(the architect) selected a 0.6-acre terrace abutting Griffith Park to connect the idea of the ancient temple with Modernism. The architect incised a grand arch at the entry facade, and turned the corner with a bold, recessed arcade overlooking an expansive plaza and pool with views of the park, city and ocean. The lavish use of red brick warms the underlying steel, concrete and glass structure. The entry, center hall and living room display monumental volumes rarely seen in Modern domestic architecture'

    Located at 2291 North Hobart Boulevard in the Los Feliz Estates neighborhood of Los Angeles..
  • Shakespeare Club, Marston, Van Pelt & Maybury, Architects c.1925
    Italian Renaissance Revival style house, originally the home of Mrs. Henry Everett, who like many East Coasters, came west to California to escape the New England winters. In 1972, the house was acquired by the Shakespeare Club, The Shakespeare Club of Pasadena was organized in 1888 and has the distinction of being the oldest women's club in Southern California. Located at 171 S. Grand Avenue in Pasadena, California.
  • Shakespeare Bridge, J.C.Wright (City of Los Angeles Engineering Dept.) 1926
    View of the pictureque bridge from the foot of Monon Street in Los Feliz. The graceful arches over the small canyon between St. George Street and Myra Avenue evoke an image of a bygone era. A lovely English garden has been planted under the bridge courtesy of community groups including the Franklin Hills Resident's Association and the Los Feliz Improvement Association.
  • Shakespeare Bridge, J.C. Wright (Los Angeles City Engineering Office) 1926
    The picturesque Franklin Avenue Bridge, affectionately known as the Shakespeare Bridge for its little Gothic towers and grand arches, is beloved by locals and visitors alike. Standing in the gap over Monon Street between St. George Street and Myra Avenue, the bridge has been used in numerous films including The Wizard of Oz.

    Declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles (No. 126) in 1974.
  • Shake Sahakian Residence, Nathan Clarence Battle, Architect 2008
    Architect Nathan Clarence Battle designed the residence for developer Shake Sahakian, demolishing a c.1924 English cottage in the process. The redesigned house was completed in 2008. The larger (3,922 sq.ft.) home was most recently (December 2008) listed for sale for $3,950,000. Located at 2514 North Commonwealth Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Shajiee Residence, John Raymond Byram, Architect 2008
    An interior view of the family's private quarters, a sweeping balcony overlooks the open family room and kitchen areas.
  • Shajiee Residence, John Raymond Byram, Architect 2008
    Nestled in the hills just south of Mulholland Drive, the Shajiee Residence reflects an organized minimalism expressed as two separate pavilions, responding to the client's desire to simultaneously entertain guests while accomodating the familiy's need for privacy.

    Glass, zinc metal panels and stainless steel ribbon railings modulate the sculpted volumes, enhancing the site's organic qualities. Glass walls of the entertainment pavilion can be rolled away, opening the space to the outdoors; guests may enjoy the fire pit and infinity pool while soaking up the panoramic view of the city below.

    Byram is best known for the design of Saladang Song Restaurant in Pasadena, in partnership with Designer Peter Tolkin. He received his Bachelor's degree in Architecture from Arizona State University and Master's degrees in Architecture and City Planning from UC Berkeley. He is also an accomplished water color artist, having studied with Robert S. Oliver and Robert J. Uecker. He currently paints with the Mount Washington Plein Air Painters.

    The Shajiee Residence is located at 4901 Azucena Drive in the Woodland Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Seyler Residence, 2305 Scarff Street, West Adams
    Built in 1894 by Abraham M. Edelman, this Queen Anne Style residence is typical of the period. Declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1989 (No. 407). Note the Burkhalter Residence next door with a very similar appearance.
  • Severance House, Joseph Cather Newsom, Architect 1904

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    Joseph Cather Newsom and his brother Samuel were among the most prolific builder-architects of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, contributing some of the most memorable homes, churches and public buildings in their long careers spanning several decades. The firm is best known for their earlier Victorian works such as the Carson Mansion in Eureka, CA (1886), Oakland City Hall (1869), the Alameda County Courthouse. (1875), and in Los Angeles, the Fitzgerald House (c.1903; Historic-Cultural Monument #258); the mansion on Miramar Street in the Westlake neighborhood (c.1890; Historic Cultural Monument #39), several residences on Carroll Avenue in Victorian Angelino Heights including the Luckenbach-Cohn Residence (c.1887 HCM#191); the Sessions House (c.1888; Historic Cultural Monument #52) amongst others. After the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, The firm closed their Los Angeles office to concentrate their efforts on the rebuilding of the Bay area.

    The Severance House is one of several Mission Revival houses the firm designed in the latter years of their Los Angeles practice. The Charles H. Greenshaw Residence in the Garvanza District of Highland Park (c.1906; HCM#565) is another notable example.


    The Severance House is located at 650 W. 23rd Street in the historic neighborhood of West Adams.
  • Selig Retail Store, Arthur E. Harvey, Architect 1931
    Pure art deco landmark located in the West MacArthur Park neighborhood of Los Angeles, the Selig Retail store was later converted into a branch of the Crocker-Citizens Bank, and for the present is a retail clothing outlet.

    What makes the building extraordinary is the use of glazed terra-cotta tile, finished in gold and set off against a black tile background.

    The Selig Retail Store is located on the northwest corner of Western Avenue and West Third Street.
  • Self-Realization Fellowship Headquarters, Meyer & Holler 1910
    Mission Revival style originally built as a hotel by Meyer & Holler, best known as the architects of the fanciful Chinese Theater in Hollywood, California. The property did not make it as a hotel, closing down only six years after opening. The property was purchased by Paramahansa Yogananda for the purpose of establishing a world-wide headquarters for the Self-Realization Fellowship.

    Located at 3880 San Rafael Avenue in the Mt. Washington neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Alfred F. Rosenheim, Architect, 1907-1910
    Located at 948 West Adams Boulevard in the Historic West Adams District, the Second Church of Christ, Scientist is a most imposing edifice in the Beaux-Arts Classical Style. Authors David Gephard & Robert Winter in their authoratative work 'An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles' claim the church was inspired by the Mother Church of Christian Science located in Boston, Massachusetts.

    The church was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1968 (No. 57). Six massive Corinthian columns and a copper-clad dome are its most striking features.

    The denomination closed the church in 2008, reflecting a declining membership and rising maintenance costs. In December 2009, it was purchased by the Art of Living Foundation, intending to use the facility as a center for meditation and 'raising social awareness.'
  • Seaman-Foshay House, Joseph Cather Newsom 1888
    The Machell-Seaman House, also known as the Seaman House and the Seaman-Foshay House, is a Queen Anne-Eastlake style Victorian house in the West Adams section of Los Angeles, California. The house was built in 1888 and designed by architect Joseph Cather Newsom. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1988 and declared a Historic Cultural Monument (No. 408) by the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission in 1989.

    Located at 2341 Scarff Street.
  • Scottish Rite Temple, Millard Sheets, Architect 1961








    If the style reminds you of a Home Savings and Loan Association building, don't be surprised. Millard Sheets was the principal architect for the firm during a two-decade run. Typical elements of the architect's style (mosaics, relief sculptures) are also employed here.

    The relief sculptures on the front of the building depict Imhotep, builder of the pyramids; British architect Sir Christopher Wren, designer of St. Paul's Cathedral in London; and Founding Father George Washington, who was a member of the order.

    Membership began to fall in the 1990s; the Masons were forced to put the temple up for sale in March 1994, As of March 2011, the temple still sits empty. The eight statues still stand guard; a distinctive part of Wilshire Boulevard for more than 50 years.

    Located at 4357 Wilshire Boulevard in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Scofield House, Frederick L. Roehring 1909
    Architect Frederick L. Roehring designed the Scofield House in 1909 in a hybrid style, combining Craftsman, Pueblo Revival and Prairie School elements. The interior, according to David Gebhard and Robert Winter 'is very Wrightian.' The Scofield House is located at 280 S. Orange Grove Boulevard in Pasadena, California.
  • Science Hall, USC, John & Donald Parkinson, Architects 1928
    One of six historic Romanesque style buildings on the main campus of the University of Southern California designed by John and Donald Parkinson, Architects as part of the school's first master plan. Construction was begun in 1924 and completed in 1928 at a cost of $600,000. A renovation project to update the building's antiquated systems is projected to cost approximately $15 million (2007).
  • Schumacher House, Harry E. Weiner, Architect 1925








    Spanish Revival style house originally designed for Harry F. Schumacher by Architect Harry E. Weiner in 1925. By 1930, it was the home of Frederic Zelnik, one of the most important producers-directors of the German silent cinema. After Hitler took power in 1933, Zelnik moved to London where he continutued to direct and produce films until his death in 1950.

    The house has a grisly past. On December 6, 1959, Dr. Harold Perelson, a heart specialist, bludgeoned his wife to death with a hammer at the house, and severly beat his 18-year old daughter, Judye, while the two younger children slept soundly in their rooms. Judye survived the beating, running to a neighbor's house to call for help. When the two younger children awoke asking what all the screaming was about, their father told them they were having a nightmare and to go back to sleep.

    Before the police arrived, Perelson drank a glass of poison, instantly killing himself. The children were taken into custody and the mansion was locked up until about a year later, when it was purchased by Emily and Julian Enriquez through a probate auction sale. The Enriquez family has never occupied the mansion; the house remains vacant 50 years since the murder. Apparently the Perelson's furniture and belongings remain as they did on the night of the fatal stabbing; a Los Angeles Times article from February 6, 2009 states that half-wrapped presents and the Christmas tree still stand in the living room.

    Located at 2475 Glendower Place in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Schrage House, Raphael Soriano, Architect, 1951
    Along with his contemporaries, Gregory Ain, John Lautner, Charles & Ray Eames and Harwell Hamilton Harris amongst others, Raphael Soriano was in important contributor to the 'Second Generation' of California Modernists. Having worked with both Richard Neutra and Rudolf Schindler, Soriano provides a link between the two. Both Craig Ellwood and Pierre Koenig worked for Soriano, and Frank Gehry claims to have been strongly influenced by his work. His first residential commission was the Lipetz House in Silver Lake in 1936, which created a sensation at the 1937 International Exhibition in Paris, winning the prestigious Prix de Rome and establishing his reputation.

    Construction on the home for David and Riva Schrage commenced in 1950, in the same time frame as the architect's Case Study House in the Pacific Palisades. The Schrage House is the only remaining Soriano-designed 1950s steel house that is close to its original condition and remains one of his finest. It is located at 2648 Commonwealth Avenue in Los Feliz.

    For more information about the work of this distinguished architect, the book 'Raphael Soriano' by Wolfgang Wagener, published by Phaedon Press makes for enjoyable reading.
  • Schmalix Residence, Fung + Blatt 1998
    The architects Fung + Blatt designed the 'industrial-modern' live/work home and office for Austrian painter Hubert Schmalix in 1998. Located at 3736 Mayfair Drive in the Mt. Washington neighborhood of Los Angeles, California.
  • Schlessinger House, Rudolph M. Schindler, Architect 1952; Eric Lamers, Restoration 2014
    From his arrival in Los Angeles on December 3, 1920 until his death on August 22, 1953, Rudolph Schindler had worked on some 450 projects (some in conjunction with others) of which approximately one-fourth were built.

    The Schlesinger House, built for the family of Dr. Philip Schlessinger, a popular professor at nearby Los Angeles City College for more than 60 years, was one of Schindler's last commissions. Professor Schlessinger.died at age 96 on September 22, 2010.

    Built on a a hillside overlooking the famed Shakespeare Bridge, the house was occupied by the Schlessinger family continuously since 1952. After Schlessinger's death, the house sat empty for several years before being purchased and restored by its current owner, who sought the services of restoration expert Eric Lamers. The house is currently (January 2014) on the market listed for sale for $1,149,000.

    Located at 1901 Myra Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Santa Monica City Hall, Donald B. Parkinson and Joseph M. Estep, Architects 1938-39
    Designed by Architects Donald Parkinson and Joseph Estep between 1938-1939 in the Art-Deco-Moderne Style. The murals were painted by Stanton MacDonald-Wright, in a revolutionary new method of painting called “petrachrome.”, with the paint being mixed with crushed tile, marble, and granite, a technique recognized as an important development in the evolution of mural painting.

    MacDonald-Wright was the director of the Southern California Division of the Federal Works Progress Administration form 1935-1942. He taught at Otis Art School where one of his students was Henry Lion, the sculptor of the Cabrillo statue (San Pedro). Located at 1685 Main Street in Santa Monica.
  • Sanborn House, Charles & Henry Greene, Architects 1903
    One of the Geene brothers eariest commissions, a house and stable for Samuel P. Sanborn. The house originally stood at 999 E. Colorado Blvd.; it was moved to its present location in 1923,

    The Sanborn House is located at 65 N. Catalina Avenue in Pasadena. It is on the Pasadena Register of Historic Properties.
  • San Gabriel Civic Auditorium, Arthur B. Benton 1923-27; De Brettville & Polyzoides, Restoration 1992
    The Mission Revival Auditorium was designed and built for a specific purpose; John Steven McGroarty's 'Mission Play' was presented here in over 3,000 performances between 1912 and 1933. Architect Arthur B. Benton designed the edifice to resemble the Mission de San Antonio Padua in the oak-studded valley of Polon, California.
    Located at 428 South Mission Drive in the City of San Gabriel, California.
  • San Fernando Buiding, John F. Blee, Architect 1906; Robert Brown Young & Son (Expansion) 1911
    James B. Lankershim, a prominent figure in the development and expansion of Los Angeles during the early 20th Century, employed architect John F. Blee to design a Renaissance Revival style office building for him at the corner of 4th and Main Street, which opened in 1907. Lankershim named the building 'The San Fernando', in reference to the family's vast land holdings in the San Fernando Valley.

    The building has elaborate decorative elements, including an incised diamond motif and an elegant lobby with 22-foot ceiling. During the 1980s and '90s, the immediate area surrounding the building suffered a decline, becoing Los Angeles 'skid row'. The building was acquired in 1998 by developer Tom Gilmore, along with the nearby Continental and Hellman Buildings; all three landmarks of the early 20th Century have been rescued and restored.

    The San Fernando Building is located at 400 S. Main Street in downtown Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 2002 (No. 728) and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.
  • Samuel-Navarro House, Lloyd Wright, Architect, 1928
    Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, Jr. in 1928, the Samuel/Navarro Residence reflects the Wrightian ideal of organic architecture in art deco style. The entire structure is defined by a handsome hammered-copper frieze which provides dramatic detail. Actress Diane Keaton lived here in the 1990's and employed Architect Josh Schweitzer to remodel it to her tastes. The house is located at 5609 Valley Oak Drive in the Los Feliz Oaks.Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1974. (No. 130).
  • Samson Tire and Rubber Company (The Citadel), Morgan, Walls & Clements, Architects 1929-30
    Modeled after the fortified Assyrian city of Khorsabad, the tire company was apparently looking for a connection between the Jewish folk hero, Samson, slayer of the Philistines (conquered by the Assyrians c.732 B.C). The ziggurat-styled fortified walls and priest-king reliefs are reminiscent of the carvings found at the palace built by Sargon II at Khorsabad, not far from the ancient city of Ninevah.

    After the factory closed in 1978, the buildings remained vacant until 1990. A master plan for the site transformed the complex into a regional outlet mall, 'The Citadel' developed by Sussman/Prejza Inc., landscape architect Martha Schwartz and Peridian Irving.

    Located at 5675 Telegraph Road in the City of Commerce. Visible from the Santa Ana Freeway at the Washington Boulevard exit.
  • Samitaur Tower, Eric Owen Moss, Architect 2010
    Frederick and Laurie Samitaur-Smith selected avant-garde architect Eric Owen Moss to renovate and re-design derelict industrial buildings near downtown Culver City beginning in 1986. The collaboration of developer and architect has produced some of the most unusual architecture imaginable. The Samitaur Tower, a fantastic beacon of rusted metal and concrete and the first of eight the couple plan on building, is located directly across from the Exposition Light Rail Transit Line. The tower has been conceived to serve multiple functions---Two open-air amphitheaters at the base can accommodate up to 300 for lectures, panel discussions, readings and screenings. The steel decks of the multistory structure are designed to make people want to gather. An adjacent landscaped courtyard lets the space expand to host up to 3,000 for arts festivals, live music and theater and dance performances. Nearby exhibition and café spaces bolster the concept of the Tower as the centerpiece of a truly public art forum. Located at the corner of National Boulevard and Hayden Avenue in Culver City, California.
  • Sam Taylor Residence, J.R. Davidson 1947
    Architect J. R. Davidson designed the contemporary house for Sam Taylor in 1947. It was the first of two commissions he did on Waverly Drive in Los Feliz, a few houses apart at 3247 Waverly Drive
  • Sam Lewis House, Joseph Cather Newsom, Architect c.1890








    One of the first residences built with financing from our California Bank was the Sam Lewis House. Sam Lewis served as a captain in the Civil War, where he participated in the siege of Chattanooga, battles at Peachtree Creek, Chattahoochee River and Jonesboro.

    The Sam Lewis house still stands today at 1425 Miramar Street in Los Angeles, around the corner from Witmer Street and the Witmer estate, which is on the national register of historic properties. The home has been used throughout the years for different movie sets and backdrops.

    The architect was one of the great builders of early California; many of his best known projects may still be seen, including the Carson Mansion (Eureka); Fitzgerald House, and the Severance House, both in Los Angeles.

  • Saints Felicitas & Perpetua Catholic Church, G. Lawrence Ott, M. L. Barker, Architects 1948
    Architects G. Lawrence Ott, M. L. Barker designed the Saints Felicitas & Perpetua Parish Church in an Italianate style in 1948. The church is constructed with reinforced concrete, Spanish tile roof and a beautiful bell tower along the south side. The sanctuary is graces with thirty-two stained glass windows donated by families of the parish. A circular stained glass window in the back of the church depicts the Resurrection of Christ.

    The church is located at 1190 Palomar Rd in San Marino, California.
  • Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church, Frank Capitan, Architect 1893
    Late Victorian Gothic in style, the church originally had a high spire above its square tower. Its sheer size and elegant architecture are a reminder of the once-well-to-do neighborhood that surrounds it.

    Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1989 (No. 468). Located at 2210 Sichel Street in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Ruth B. Shannon Center for the Performing Arts, Albert C. Martin Associates 1990
    Architects Albert C. Martin Associates Postmodern interpretation of the Spanish Revival style, an attempt to blend in with the other buildings on the campus of Whittier College built during the 1920s.
    The center includes the 403-seat Robinson Theatre, the 75-seat Studio Theatre and academic facilities for the school's Department of Theatre Arts. Located at 6760 Painter Avenue.
  • Rupple House, Roland E. Coate 1938
    Architect Roland E. Coate designed the French Revival style house in 1938. The house is located at 2225 Robles Avenue in the affluent community of San Marino, California.



  • Rufus C. Mead Auditorium, Cyril Bennett and Fitch Haskell 1931
    The auditorium was built in 1931 and was designed by Cyril Bennett and Fitch Haskell, who also designed the Pasadena Civic Auditorium. The original style was Moorish- Spanish Colonial but most of this was lost in the remodeling of 1962. The present modernist décor was designed by Culver Heaton. The auditorium was named for Rufus C. Mead, Muir’s first Principal (1926-1936).

    Located at 1905 Lincoln Avenue in Pasadena, California. Please do not use this image in any media without my permission. © All rights reserved.

  • Roy & Patricia Disney Family Cancer Center, SWA Architects 2010
    Described as a 'beautiful place for healing', the Roy and Patricia Disney Family Cancer Center is the first comprehensive cancer treatment center in the San Fernando Valley. The center offers cutting-edge diagnostics and treatment; integrative medicine including herbal remedies and meditation; rehabilitation; nutrition counseling; involvement in clinical trials; a resource center for patients to research their illnesses; social services; and spiritual care. The 57,000-square-foot center was funded with $10 million in seed money provided by the Roy and Patricia Disney family; the rest came from a variety of sources, including local studios, physicians, former patients and the business and philanthropic communities.

    The center is located at 181 South Buena Vista Street, Burbank, CA 91505
  • Roxie Theater, John Cooper Architect 1931



    The opening of the Pantages Theater (now the Arcade) in 1910 sparked the arrival of the Broadway Theater District, which became the center for filmdom's world premieres that lasted for the next twenty years. After Sid Grauman opened a pair of movie palaces in Hollywood, the Egyptian in 1922 and Chinese in 1927, the area started to see a decline. The art deco style Roxie Theater, which opened in 1931 was its last hurrah.

    Located at 512-524 South Broadway in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Rowena Reservoir Lagoon, Meléndrez Landscape Design 2001
    When the Rowena Reservoir was slated to be replaced with underground water tanks as part of a water quality improvement program, a Coalition for the Preservation of Open Reservoirs filed a lawsuit to preserve the water features. Meléndrez Landscape Design was selected to redesign the new water feature which includes three lakes to total four acres, with waterfalls connecting the lakes, which are located on top of a 10 million gallon potable water storage tank. While the underground tank allows for controlled water quality, the water feature provides a beautiful visual amenity for the surround homes and neighborhood with drought-tolerant landscaping. The historic row of Mexican Fan Palms remains, as do the large historic trees on-site. The project included restoration of several historic maintenance buildings and a small new utility building. Historic street lights in the neighborhood were also maintained, restored or replaced. The problem for most observers is that the reservoir is off-limits to the public, surrounded by a high security fence.


  • Rothman House, Paul R. Williams 1926
    Architect Paul R. Williams designed the English Tudor Revival Rothman House in 1926. The house is located at 541 South Rossmore Avenue in the exclusive Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Rosenheim Mansion, Alfred Rosenheim, Architect 1915
    Built by the architect as his personal residence, the Rosenheim Mansion is one of the most beautiful mansions in the Country Club Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. The Tudor Revival style house is approximately 15,000 sq. feet, including a 50' long grand ballroom, seven bedrooms, 6.5 baths, six fireplaces, a round stair tower and a chapel. Rosenheim was a prominent architect during the early part of the twentieth century. Other notable Rosenheim projects include the May Company (downtown, 1908), the Hellman Building (1903); the Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Los Angeles (1908), the Cameo Theater (downtown historic theater district, 1910), the Britt Mansion & Gardens (1910) and the opulent Pompeiian Room in the Doheny Mansion. He was the first president of the Los Angeles Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

    The Rosenheim Mansion is located at 1120 S. Westchester Place. In 1999, it was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 660). It has been frequently seen in films, notably 'Spiderman' and 'Seabiscuit'. In 2007, it was listed for sale for $4.6M, however remains unsold.
  • Rose House c.1862
    Queen Anne Victorian style house, located at 7020 La Presa Drive in San Gabriel, California. The house is believed to be the oldest frame house in the San Gabriel Valley. Although the house is partially hidden behind a shoulder high hedge, a quick glimpse through the gate revealed lovely landscaped grounds and one of the loveliest swimming pools I can remember.
  • Rose Bowl, Myron Hunt, Architect 1921-22








    Patterned after the Yale Bowl (New Haven, Conn c.1914) the Rose Bowl stadium was designed by architect Myron Hunt in 1921. Located in the dry Arroyo Seco dry riverbed, the stadium was was dedicated on January 1, 1923, the occasion marked by a USC victory over Penn State 14–3. The Rose Bowl stadium is best known in the U.S. for its hosting of the Rose Bowl, the first and most famous postseason college football game. Located at 1001 Rose Bowl Drive.
  • Roman Gardens, Pierpont and Davis 1926
    Architects F. Pierpont Davis and Walter S. Davis designed the elaborate garden apartments in 1926, drawing on Romanesque and Moorish influences. Declared a Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument (No. 397) in 1988 (No. 397). Located at 2000 North Highland Avenue in Hollywood, California.
  • Rodriguez House, Rudolph Schindler, 1941
    The Verdugo Woodlands neighborhood of Glendale, California is much appreciated for its quiet, leafy streets. Discovering Schindler's 'Rodriguez House' on beautiful Niodrara Drive is an enchanting experience. Set back from the street, the Rodriguez House is an extraordinary architectural composition that blends in perfectly with the sylvan setting.

    Built in 1941, the Rodriguez House is located at 1845 Niodrara Drive in Glendale. It is listed in the Glendale Register of Historic Places.
  • Rock Row, Heydey Partnership Architects 2009







    Rock Row is Los Angeles' first project to be LEED- certified under USGBC guidelines for small lot subdivisions.

    Developed by Heydey Partnership, the complex aims to demonstrate that modern sustainably built homes can also be affordable. The complex features permeable, grass-paved driveways preventing run-off. Each house is topped with a green roof planted with water-efficient, drought-tolerant landscaping.

    Located at 1546 Yosemite Way in Eagle Rock, California
  • Robert Williams House, Train & Williams, Architects c.1905
    Architects Train and Williams completed the design of the Craftsman style residence for Robert Edmund Williams in 1905. The outstanding features of the home are the stained glass windows designed by nearby Judson Studios and the arroyo stones surrounded the base. Today, the home operates as a children's home. Located at 840 N. Avenue 66 in the Highland Park Historic District of Los Angeles. Designated a Los Angeles-Historic-Cultural Monument in 1989 (no. 411).
  • Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools, Gozalez Goodale Architects 2010
    The Robert F. Kennedy Community Schools is a complex of public schools built on the site of the Ambassador Hotel, originally designed by architect Myron Hunt in 1921. The hotel was the site where United States Senator and Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1968. The hotel was razed in 2006, and after much debate, a new school, designed by architects of Gonzalez Goodale was completed in 2010. It cost $578 million to build, making it the most expensive public school in the United States. Some of the original details of the school have been preserved, including the lobby and entrance to the Cocoanut Grove, the hotel's famous night club.

    Located at 3400 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.

  • Robert Allen Residence c.1889
    The Shingle style house was built in 1889 fir Robert Allen, a prominent Angelino and Los Angeles City Council Member. Notable details of the facade include the single 'eyelid' dormer,on the left, and the conical, three-sided dormer on the right.

    The Allen House is located at 2125 Bonsallo Avenue in the historic West Adams neighborhood of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No.561) in 1992.
  • Rindge House, Frederick L. Roehrig, Designer 1906
    Grand chateau-style mansion with Richardsonian Romanesque elements designed for Frederick H. Rindge, a wealthy landowner and financier with extensive holdings in the West Adams neighborhood as well as Malibu.

    The Rindge House in located at 2263 S. Harvard Blvd. in the West Adams district of Los Angeles. In 1972, it was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles (No. 95).
  • Richard Riordan Central Library, Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue, Architect 1926
    Originally named simply the Central Library, the building has been renamed twice; first, in honor of Rufus von KleinSmid, longtime president of the Board of Library Commissioners and President of the University of Southern California, and in 2001, after Los Angeles Mayor Richard Riordan.

    The building, which was Goodhue's last major work, draws on influences from ancient Egyptian architecture, principally the mosaic pyramid central tower, as well as assorted sphinxes and snakes. It is similar in style to the Nebraska State Capital building, also designed by Goodhue. A ravaging fire desolated the building in 1986; the 1987 Whittier Narrows Earthquake and a second fire a few years later did furthur damage.

    After all this, it is a wonder that the building survived at all. The library survives as an oasis of learning, dwarfed by its skyscraper neighbors, a testament to the will of preservationists to protect Los Angeles' cultural heritage.

    Los Angeles Central Library is located at 630 W. 5th Street in downtown Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1967 (No. 46)
  • Richard & Carol Soucek King Residence, Buff & Hensman, Architects 1979
    Designer Carol Soucek-King and her entrepeneur/attorney husband Richard commissioned Architects Conrad Buff III and Donald C. Hensmen for the design of their Pasadena home, the only house in Arroyo Seco Park.

    The Kings purchased the land in the late 70s; the dramatic minimalist/modern home under the historic Arroyo Seco Bridge is the perfect setting for 'salons' of the Institute of Philosophy and the Arts', reflecting the Kings desire to share their passion for the 'spiritually creative life.'

    The King Residence is located at 60 El Circulo Drive. The couple have plans to donate the home to the University of Southern California to be preserved in perpetuity as the Carol Soucek King and Richard King Center for Architecture.
  • Rev. Williel Thomson Residence, Highland Park, 1908
    This imposing Late Queen Anne Style Victorian is situated on a deep lot located at 215 South Avenue 52 in historic Highland Park. It was built in 1898 for the Rev. Williel Thomson. It was declared a Los Angeles' Historic-Cultural Monument in 1991 (No. 542).
  • Renaissance Building, Johannes Van Tilburg & Associates; Jonathan Barofsky, Artist 1989
    The architect had in mind a post modern re-interpretation of the Venetian architecture that originally occupied the beach-side community at the turn of the century. Artist Jonathan Borofsky designed the clown, a Venice landmark.

    Located at 255 Main Street in Santa Monica, California.
  • Red O Restaurant, Gulla Jonsdottir Design 2010
    Designer Gulla Jonsdottir drawing inspiration from living in Mexico, completed the design for the Mexican restaurant Red O in 2010. The architecture is described as 'glass walls clad with shard-like steel pieces; an interior of 'free-flowing billowing white fabrics, dark woods, large chandeliers, brass bells, communal tables and banquettes, curvilinear walls, and sculptural pieces.'

    Red O Restaurant is located at 8155 Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles.
  • Reade House, Robert Frank Duff, Architect c.1968
    Architect Robert Duff designed the post and beam house for Martin & Jessie Reade in 1968. The architect also designed Clearman's Northwoods Inn restaurant and the San Gabriel Bowling Alley The house is currently (September 2012) on the market and listed for sale at $649,000. I had the pleasure of photographing it for the listing agent a few days ago. The house, as described in the listing 'sits atop a private hilltop, positioned to take in the spectacular city lights and mountain views from almost every room. There is an open floor plan, all on one level, with exposed wood beam and vaulted ceilings. The spacious living room features a wood-burning stove, separate sitting area and floor-to-ceiling windows that stretch across the entire front of the home. A front balcony provides the perfect place to enjoy the sunset. The kitchen has stainless steel appliances and an abundance of cabinets. Both bedrooms have vaulted ceilings, extra closets and both open onto the colorfully landscaped backyard. The spectacularly landscaped lot with mature trees and plants and with a large flat-pad backyard, is perfect for entertaining.'

    Located at 4628 Nob Hll Drive in the Mt. Washington community of Los Angeles.
  • Raymond House, Irving Gill 1918
    Noted for its similarity to Gill's famously demolished Dodge House in West Hollywood, the Raymond House is located at 2742 E. Ocean Boulevard along the Long Beach seashore in the Alamitos Beach neighborhood.
  • Rasche House, Frank R. Rasche, Architect 1923








    Frank P. Rasche was a leading home builder in Los Angeles during the 1920s. He built the French Revival style house for his family, including his wife Mary Viola Rasche and their teenage son, Frank W. Rasche in 1923. Rasche is credited with the design of a theater in Hollywood, originally the Paramount, located at 5528 Santa Monica Boulevard. The theater was re-named the Loma Theatre by the early 1940's, operated by Fox West Coast Theaters and has since been demolished.

    Located at 2027 N. Hobart Blvd. in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Randolph Huntington Miner Residence, Sumner Hunt, Architect c.1904

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    The English Tudor house has a storied history; from the early 1900s until WWI, Julita Miner, granddaughter of a former governor of Spanish California and her husband, Capt. Randolph Miner were reigning socialites of Los Angeles, entertaining lavishly at the home. In later years Theda Bara, Fatty Arbuckle, Joseph Schenk and Norma Talmadge would also call the mansion home.

    Today the home is the AMAT House of the Congregation Of The Mission. Located at 649 West Adams Blvd.
  • Rampart Police Station, Perkins + Will Architect 2007
    The architectural firm Perkins+Will designed the modern Rampart Area Police Station in 2007, replacing the original which had been scandalized by a long history of corruption in the late 1990s; a period in which more than 70 officers were implicated in some form of misconduct. The new $28.8 million facility, funded by taxpayer-approved Proposition Q is located in the Westlake-MacArthur Park area, one of the most densely populated multi-ethnic neighborhoods of Los Angeles. The campus of the two-story 52,000 sq. ft. state-of-the-art facility includes a multi-level parking structure for 231 vehicles and a vehicle refueling and maintenance service center. The project which achieved LEED gold standard, sought to engage the community by incorporating public meeting spaces within the facility and by maximizing green space around the perimeter.
    Located at 1401 W 6th Street.
  • Ralphs House, Ain, Johnson & Day 1950








    Ain, Johnson and Day designed the house for Walter Ralphs, a bakery and grocery chain magnate in 1950; it was one of the firms largest commissions. The house is situated on a spectacular site overlooking the Arroyo Seco and the Rose Bowl. According to reports, the client was overbearing and demanding, leading to compromises in the design and finished product. Neither seemed satisfied with the result: the Ralphs moved out about a year later. Located at 1350 Linda Ridge Road in Pasadena, California.
  • Ralph M. Parsons Office Tower, William Pereira Associates 1974
    World headquarters for the Parsons Corporation, one of the largest engineering and construction companies in the United States, founded by Ralph M. Parsons in 1944. The company has delivered landmark projects around the globe, including the construction of the Alaska North Slope.

    Located at 100 W. Walnut Street in Pasadena.
  • Ralph J. Chandler Residence, Henry F. Withey Architect 1921; Carlton M. Winslow, Addition 1931



    Italianate Mediterranean style residence designed by architect Henry F. Withey in 1921. An addition by architect Carlton M. Winslow was added in 1931. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 2011 (No. 1003). Located at 1926 N. Hobart Boulevard in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles. The house is currently (April 30, 2012) on the market and listed for sale for $3.1M.
  • Ralph J. Chandler House, Wallace Neff, Architect 1960
    Greek temple designed by Architect Wallace Neff in 1960 for Ralph J. Chandler, perhaps a relative of the Los Angeles Times' Chandler Family. The house has the fluted columns and scrolled capitals characteristic of the Neo-Classical style. Located at 105 N. Rssmore Avenue in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Race Through the Clouds, Steven Ehrlich 1986-89
    The building pays homage to the roller coaster that once stood on the site; note the undulating steel rail, weaving around the building, mimicking the coaster's tracks.

    Located at 1600 Main Street in Venice Beach, California.
  • R.R. Blacker House, Charles & Henry Greene 1907
    Architects Greene & Greene designed the house for Robert Rue Blacker, a lumber magnate at the cost of $100,000 in 1907. The house is regarded as a masterpiece of the American Arts and Crafts Movement. The house displays the harmony associated with the Japanese wood building style, with wide hanging eaves and an emphasis on horizontal lines.

    The house, located at 1177 Hillcrest Avenue in Pasadena, is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
  • R.F. Elliot House, R.M. Schindler, Architect 1930, Marmol & Radziner (Remodel) 2001
    Driving up a short cul-de-sac off Talmadge Street in Los Feliz, it might be easy to overlook the R.F. Elliot House, designed by Rudolph M. Schindler in 1930. Hidden behind dense vegetation, it is possible to see only the garage from the street. Thankfully, I was able to visit the house in a MAK Center tour a couple of years ago. Built for Schindler's insurance agent, Robert F. Elliot, the house was restored in recent years by Cameron Silver, owner of a vintage clothing store (Decades)and his partner Jeffrey Snyder, an interior decorator and set designer. Silver and Snyder retained architects Leo Marmol and Ron Radziner, who have built a reputation for sensitive restoration of historic homes, including Richard Neutra's Kaufmann House in Palm Springs and the Albert Frey home built for Raymond Loewy, as well as Schindler's King Road House.

    The R.F. Elliot Residence is located at 4237 Newdale Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • R.E. Shine Residence, N.W. Fowler Architect 1916
    A 9-room, 4-bedroom, 1-bath, 2224 sq/ft two-story Craftsman style house designed for R.E. Shine in 1916 by N.W. Fowler, Architect. The house is located in the Hartford Villa Foothill Tract, now designated the Hollywood Grove Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ), an historic neighborhood of approximately 139 Craftsman, Colonial, and Mediterranean style homes dates from the early 1900’s and one of Hollywood’s last intact turn-of- the-century neighborhoods. Located at 1970 N. Canyon Drive.

  • Putnam House, William M. Ache 1922; Barbara Bestor Restoration c.2005
    Classic Los Feliz Mediterranean style house originally built in 1922. Located on over over 1/3 acre of park like grounds on a street to street lot adjoining Laughlin Park.the four bedroom, 4.5 bath residence in over 3800 sq. ft. is currently (April 2013) on the market and listed for sale for $2,585,000.

    Located at 2000 North Hobart Boulevard in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Putnam House, George Wyman, Architect 1903
    The Putnam House, located at 5944 Hayes Avenue in Highland Park, was designed by Architect George H. Wyman in 1903. The architect mixed Craftsman and Colonial Revival styles to create a unique composition.

    Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultura Monument in 1988 (No. 375).
  • Pueblo del Rio Public Housing, Paul R. Williams 1941-42
    The Pueblo del Rio Public Housing Project was developed by a consortium of architects including Adrian Wilson, Gordon B. Kaufmann, Wurdeman and Becket, and Richard Neutra with Paul Williams acting as supervising architect. Ralph Cornell was responsible for designing the landscaping. The project consists of fifty-seven two story buildings arranged in rows, with plenty of green spaces in between. Located at 1801 E. 53rd Street in South Central Los Angeles.
  • Prindle House, George Washington Smith 1926-1928
    Born on George Washington's birthday, Architect George Washington Smith received his early trainng at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts and later at Harvard University and the Académie Julian in Paris. On a visit to Montecito, a rustic suburb of Santa Barbara (California) intending only to stay for the duration of World War I, he remained for an extended time, purchasing land and building a home and studio. The house he built 'Casa Dracaena' was an immediate success. Smith discovered his calling. Before long he stopped painting and took up working as an architect full-time in Santa Barbara, remaining for the rest of his life. Before his death in 1930 Smith designed some 80 homes in Santa Barbara County alone. During his lifetime, Smith was one of the most popular architects in the United States, often referred to as the 'father' of the Spanish-Colonial Revival style. The Prindle, House, located at 1311 Hillcrest Avenue is typical of his work, designed in a Mediterranean Revival style.

  • Powers Residence, Arthur L. Haley, Architect, 1904
    Alvarado Terrace, just south of Pico Boulevard and east of Hoover Street has a half a dozen lovely period homes facing Terrace Park. Built in 1904 by Pomeroy Powers, President of the Los Angeles City Council from 1900-1904. Powers was a real estate developer who helped establish the small park across the street.

    The Powers Residence is located at 1345 Alvarado Terrace. The home was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1971 (No. 86).
  • Post House No. 2, Joseph J Blick 1903
    Architect Joseph J. Blick designed the Shingle style house in 1903. Located at 360 S. Grand Avenue in the historic Lower Arroyo Seco neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • Pompeian Room, Doheny Mansion
    The Pompeian Room is widely admired for its breathtaking beauty featuring a glass dome made by Louis Tiffany, marble columns from Siena and a lovely bronzed gold-leaf frieze.
  • Pilot House, A. Quincy Jones 1948
    Architect A. Quincy Jones designed the post-and-beam style house in 1948 as a case study for the Crestwood Hills development, a 'slice of Utopia' in Brentwood, which boasted 160 houses that were modest in size, but elevated inexpensive building materials into sophisticated post-and-beam 'jewel boxes'.

    Located at 735 Rome Drive in the Mt. Washington neighborhood of Los Angeles, California.
  • Pilgrim Congregational Church, Robert H. Orr 1911
    The thirty-six Congregationalists who gathered at the Taylor Opera House on May 26, 1887 to start a church must have possessed a good measure of faith as well as fortitude. At the time, Pomona was sparsely populated; only about 3000 persons lived in the entire valley. To top it off, the group founded Pomona College just four months later. By 1910 the membership had grown to over 500 members, and plans for a new site and sanctuary were made. The present day red brick Gothic was dedicated on May 26, 1912 on the occasion of the church's twenty-fifth anniversary, standing as an enduring testament of faith. The stained glass windows were designed by artist J.R. Rudy of the Los Angeles Art Glass Company.

    Located at 600 Garey Avenue in Pomona, California.
  • Pile House 'Idlewild', Samuel & Joseph Cather Newsom c.1887-88
    The architects designed the home for Gen. William Anderson Pile and his wife, Hannah Cain Pile in 1887-88. Pile served in the Civil War as a Union Army General, was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, and later was Governor of the New Mexico Territory and Minister to Venezuela. He was one of the first trustees of the City of Monrovia and also served the town as Mayor. He died in 1889 and is buried at Live Oak Memorial Park (Monrovia).. Located at 255 N. Mayflower Avenue.
  • Physical Education Building, USC, John & Donald Parkinson, Architects 1928
    One of six northern Italian Romanesque style buildings designed by John & Donald Parkinson for the university between 1920 and 1928. The 1000-seat facility is the oldest athletic training building on campus. The view is of the west entrance, featuring a single Roman arch and extensive cast stone detailing.
  • Phillips House, Elmer Gray, Architect 1930
    Architect Elmer Grey (1872-1963) designed the Norman syle chateau for Dr. Charles E. Phillips in 1930.

    Grey's architectural practice, which was based in Pasadena. designed many noted Southern California landmarks, including the Beverly Hills Hotel, the Huntington Art Gallery, the Pasadena Playhouse and Wattles Mansion. He is credited with being a pioneer in the development of a new American style of architecture with a focus on harmony with nature and eliminating features not belonging to the local climate and conditions.

    The house is located at 4803 Cromwell Avenue in the Los Feliz District of Los Angeles.
  • Petitfils-Boos House, Charles Plummer, Architect 1922








    The Petitfils--Boos House is a Renaissance Revival style mansion in the Hancock Park section of Los Angeles, California. It was designed by Charles F. Plummer and built in 1922. In 2005, the house was added to the National Register of Historic Places based on architectural criteria.

    Located at 545 S Plymouth Blvd. in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Peter Nolan Residence, Norstrom & Anderson, Architect 1930
    Spanish Colonial Revival style residence, designed by Norstram & Anderson, Architect 1930. Film Director Paul Thomas Anderson purchased the house in 2001 along with his girlfriend singer-songwriter Fiona Apple. Anderson is often considered one of the most talented filmmakers of his generation; his credits include Boogie Nights (1997), Magnolia (1999), Punch-Drunk Love (2002) and There Will Be Blood (2007). Fiona Apple received a Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance in 1996 for her debut album, Tidal. The house was purchase in 2003 by television actor Jason Priestly. He is best known as the righteous Brandon Walsh on the television series Beverly Hills, 90210 and for his current role starring as Richard 'Fitz' Fitzpatrick in the show Call Me Fitz.

    The 5 bedroom, six bath house in 4500 sq. ft.is currently (June 2013) on the market listed for sale for.$3,995,000 and described in the listing as 'classic example of Los Angeles Spanish architecture features exquisite Art Deco details, exquisite tile work, wrought iron fixtures and stunning ceiling details sweep you into a glamorous golden era. The master suite features a walk-in closet and original tile bathroom. The property also features hardwood floors, custom hardware, a steam room, gym, French doors opening on to sun-drenched balconies, and an exquisite Deco movie theater worthy of a Hollywood premiere. Lovingly restored and upgraded, the lush canyon views and private yard with pool, spa and full kitchen, round out this beautiful and rare offering.

    Located at 2459 Park Oak Drive in the Los Feliz Oaks neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Pershing Square, Ricardo Legorreta, Architect, 1994 (re-design)
    Pershing Square in downtown Los Angeles, has had many incarnations. First dedicated as Los Angeles Park in 1870, in succeeding years, its name changed to 6th Street Park, and later, Central Park. In 1910, the park was renovated with a new design by the eminent architect John Parkinson (designer of Los Angeles City Hall and Union Station, along with dozens of other Los Angeles' landmarks). The park was re-named Pershing Square in 1918, after WWI hero Gen. John Joseph Pershing.

    In subsequent years, the park became seriously neglected with the shifting fortunes of Los Angeles' downtown. In 1992, the park was closed for a two-year, $14.5 million renovation designed by Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta (a disciple of Luis Barragan) and landscape architect Laurie Olin. The new park features a 10-story purple bell tower and a walkway designed by artist Barbara McCarren, resembling an earthquake faultline.

    Pershing Square is located in downtown Los Angeles, bounded by Olive Street on the west, Hill Street on the east and between 5th Street to the north and 6th Street to the south.
  • Pepperdine College, Thomas Cooper, Architect; Katherine Bashford & Frederick Barlow Jr., Landscape A
    Pepperdine College, now Pepperdine University, was founded by George Pepperdine (1886 - 1962), President of Western Auto Supply Company, which he started with an investment of $5 in 1909 at the age of 23. The Streamline Moderne style campus buildings were dedicated on Founder's Day, September 21, 1937. The original campus was located in the Vermont Knolls a few miles south of downtown Los Angeles; all of the new buildings were painted a light blue which was later marketed in Los Angeles paint stores as “Pepperdine Blue.”

    In 1968, benefactors Merritt H. Adamson, Sylvia Rindge Adamson Neville, and Rhoda-May Adamson Dallas donated 138 acres of undeveloped ranch land in Malibu for the construction of a new campus. The Los Angeles campus was closed after the 1980-1981 school year and sold as the campus of the Crenshaw Christian Center. Located at 7901 S Vermont Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90044.
  • Paxson House, Buff & Hensman 1968








    Architect Conrad Buff (Buff & Hensman) designed the house for Oxy alumnus and Emeritus Professor of Theater Omar Paxson '48 in 1968. Located near the Occidental College campus at 1911 Campus Road.
  • Paul Smith Store, Barnard & Wilson Design 2007
    Described as a 'bubblegum cube' and a 'Pepto-Bismol box' Designer Paul Smith's store on Melrose Avenue is a real eye-opener along Melrose Avenue's shopping thoroughfare. The only features on the facade is the long, rectangular glass window, accented by a small tree and the designer's signature. Located at 8221 Melrose Avenue in Los Angeles.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.

  • Patsaouras Transit Plaza, Ehrenkrantz, Ekstut Architects, MVP Architect 2000
    Patsaouras Transit Plaza is named for Nick Patsouras, a Greek immigrant and former RTD board member and passionate advocate for public transportation. The plaza serves as the new terminal for the Metro Rail Line at Union Station in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Patriotic Hall, Allied Architects 1926
    The Italian Renaissance style Patriotic Hall was designed by the firm Allied Architects in 1925 and completed in 1926. At the time of its construction it was the tallest building in Los Angeles, built to serve veterans of Indian Wars, Spanish American War, World War I and to support the Grand Army of the Republic. The building has a collection of artifacts incuding the uniforms of Winston Churchill, General George Patton, and General Norman Schwarzkopf. The hall was rededicated to honor of Bob Hope and renamed 'Bob Hope Patriotic Hall' in November 2004.

    Located at 1816 S. Figueroa in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Pasinetti House
    Built in 1958 and published in the January 1959 issue of Arts & Architecture Magazine, the Pasinetti House was commissioned by noted Italian writer Pier Maria Pasinetti as his U.S. residence. It was designed by his friend, the celebrated Romanian architect Haralamb Georgescu and is considered to be one of his best residential works in the world. Restored and updated in 2009 by Willow Glen Partners. Located at 1421 Summitridge Drive in Beverly Hills.
  • Pasadena United Methodist Church, Thomas F. Barber, Architect 1926







    Originally constructed in 1925, the imposing structure is home to a congregation that traces its beginnings in the area to 1874. A large sanctuary, seating up to 18,000, is the focal point of a complex that also includes an education building, offices, chapel and two halls.
  • Pasadena Public Library, Lamanda Park Branch, Pulliam, Matthews & Associates, Architects 1966
    Think 'Modern-day Stonehenge' and you get a sense of the place. Set back from the street, the single-story edifice has a monumental feel.

    The library is located at 140 S. Altadena Drive in east Pasadena.
  • Pasadena Police Dept., Robert A.M. Stern, Stern Ehrenkrantz Ramager, Design Architects 1989-1990
    Stern Ehrenkrant Ramager worked with a consortium of resources including EKONA as planning architect, landscape architects Campbell & Campbell and sculptor Robert Irwin in designing a building that would compliment the other classical structures in Pasadena's civic center precinct.

    The building is located on the southwest corner of Garfield and Walnut Streets in Pasadena.
  • Pasadena Museum of California Art, Johnson Favaro Architects 2000-2002
    The Pasadena Museum of California Art (PMCA) was founded in 2000 by art collectors Robert and Arlene Oltman, long-time Pasadena residents with a desire to establish a museum dedicated to the art originating in California. The museum features changing exhibits as opposed to a permanent collection and hosts the California Design Biennial.

    The museum is located at 490 East Union Street.
  • Pasadena Masonic Temple, Cyril Bennett & Fitch Haskell, Architects 1927
    Bennett & Haskell's design for a classical Greek temple makes quite a statement about the power and influence of freemasonry in Pasadena, particularly in the affluent roaring 20's. The Beaux-Arts structure is located on a quite side street in Pasadena's central business district. Ten fluted Ionic columns on the west facade are the most prominent feature.

    Architects Cyril Bennett and Fitch Haskell joined forces in 1923, designing many important Pasadena landmarks, including the Pasadena Civic Auditorium (1932), the Parish House and Rectory at All Saints Episcopal Church (1930) and the California State Armory (now the Armory Gallery, in 1932) The temple is located at 200 South Euclid Avenue.
  • Pasadena Jewish Temple and Center, Leroy Miller Associates, Architect
    The Pasadena Jewish Temple & Center (PJTC) is a synagogue and community center affiliated with Conservative Judaism (Masorti). The temple observes a wide range of Jewish beliefs and practices, dedicated to perpetuating all aspects of Jewish life and to fostering a sense of Jewish identity. The Temple provides an active house of prayer, education and assembly., seeking to include and accept all those who wish to develop cultural or social ties to Judaism. The Center traces its roots to 1923 with the opening of Temple B'nai Israel at the southeast comer of Hudson and Walnut Streets. In 1942, the Temple found a new home at its present location. The name was changed to reflect the temple's mission. Located at 1434 North Altadena Drive, Pasadena, CA 91107

  • Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Edwin Bergstrom and Bennett & Haskell 1932
    The Italian Renaissance style Pasadena Civic Auditorium was designed by architects Bergstrom, Bennett and Haskell in 1932; with J.E. Stanton contributing. The 3,00 seat facility has hosted the Emmy Awards, People’s Choice Awards, and the festivities surrounding the crowning of the Tournament of Roses Queen as well as symphonies and Broadway musicals. Located at 300 E. Green Street.

  • Pasadena City Hall, John Bakewell Jr. & Arthur Brown Jr., Architects 1925-27
    A showcase epitomizing the prestige and influence of the city in the Roaring 20's, Pasadena's City Hall was designed by the San Francisco architectural firm, Bakewell and Brown, completed in 1927. The pair designed many famous San Francisco landmarks, including City Hall, Coit Tower, Temple Emanuel, War Memorial Opera House and the Federal Building at the United Nations Plaza. The Beaux-Arts masterpiece was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.

    Located at 100 North Garfield Avenue in Pasadena.
  • Parsons Bungalow, Arthur + Alfred Heineman, Architects 1910; Tim Andersen (Restoration, 1980)

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    Described by authors Gebhard and Winter (An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles) as 'simply the finest, most characteristic California bungalows to be found anywhere', the Parsons Bungalow originally stood on the corner of Los Robles Avenue and California Street in Pasadena. The house was moved to Altadena in 1980; however it proved impossible to move the original cobblestone foundation and pillars, which had to be rebuilt.

    The Parsons Bungalow is located at 1605 E. Altadena Drive in Altadena.
  • Park Planned Homes, Gregory Ain, Architect, 1947









    In a quest for low cost, quality housing for "everyman", Architect Gregory Ain created a community of 28 residences in Altadena, California. Each house features an open floor plan with a walled courtyard and a separate enclosed garden. Many of the houses have been updated with fresh, new details, such as this one at 2768 HIghview Avenue.
  • Park Oak Drive Residence- James R. Meyer (LEAN ARCH) Architects 2005
    Sophisticated remodel by the firm LEAN ARCH, with James R. Meyer as Principal Architect. A complete makeover of a 60's split level barn and a 'misdirected French suburban tract home.' according to developer Robot & Sons who purchased the property in 2004 and hired 'red-hot Modernist Architect James R. Meyer to do the design work. The architect and builders selected simple materials: wood, stone, concrete and walls of light to create an 'urban sanctuary' in the exclusive Los Feliz Oaks community. The residence is located at 2458 Park Oak Drive. The home received the Los Feliz Improvement Association's Meliora Award in 2005, for Best Restoration.

    I had the pleasure of meeting the architect during the 2008 AIA/LA Home Tour of Los Feliz on October 26, 2008, in the company of highly regarded German photographer Martin Schall. I will have the pleasure of seeing him again next week, when we pay a visit to Julius Shulman.
  • Pantages Theater, Morgan & Walls Architects c.1911



    The opening of the Beaux Arts Pantages Theater (now the Arcade) in 1910 marked the arrival of vaudeville and early motion picture producer and theater mogul Alexander Pantages (1867 – 1936) who went on to create one of the largest and most powerful circuit of theaters across the western United States and Canada. After the theater opened in 1911, it started a trend, hitting a high water mark in 1918 with the opening of the Million Dollar Theater in 1918. The area would evolve into the Broadway Theater District, the center for filmdom's world premieres up until the opening of the Egyptian (1922) and Chinese (1927) Theaters in Hollywood, which signaled the beginning of a decline.

    Located at 532-536 South Broadway in downtown Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1991 (No. 525).
  • Panavision, Michael Czysz, Architripolis 1996
    The headquarters building for Panavision, a major supplier of movie-making equipment, was designed by the Portland-based firm Architripolis in 1996. The design incorporates subtle references to the film industry, according to author and architecture historian Laura Massino-Smith, who operates Architecture Tours L.A. (www.ArchitectureToursLA.com), 'the curved shape of the facade suggests movement and energy....the window fenestration, a film sprocket and the dark grey facade a nod to film noir.' Located at 6735 Selma Avenue in Hollywood.
  • Pan Pacific Auditorium, Wurdeman and Becket 1935
    The Pan-Pacific Auditorium was a landmark structure in the Fairfax District of Los Angeles, California which once stood at 7600 West Beverly Boulevard near the site of Gilmore Field, an early Los Angeles baseball venue predating Dodger Stadium. It was located within sight of both CBS Television City on the southeast corner of Beverly and Fairfax Avenue and the Farmers Market on the northeast corner of Third Street and Fairfax. For over 35 years it was the premiere location for indoor public events in Los Angeles. The facility was closed in 1972, beginning 17 years of steady neglect and decay. In 1978 the Pan-Pacific Auditorium was included in the National Register of Historic Places but 11 years later the sprawling wooden structure was destroyed in a spectacular fire.

    Located at 7600 W. Beverly Blvd. in the Fairfax district of West Hollywood.







  • Palmateer House, L. Milton Wolf, Architect 1924
    L. Milton Wolf designed the house for Frank R. Palmateer, President of a storage company in 1924. The 17-room English Tudor style mansion is located at 2501 North Vermont Avenue in Los Feliz.

    The multi-talented architect also worked as an art director and contractor. He was one of the principal movers and shakers behind the Hollywoodland real estate development. Milton Wolf was an art director and developer of Hollywoodland. His landmark castle, 'Wolf's Lair' on Durand Drive was recently purcased by singer-songwriter Richard Melville Hall, better known by his stage name Moby.

  • Pacific Design Center (PDC) Center Blue 'Blue Whale' César Pelli, Architect 1975
    The Pacific Design Center (PDC) is the home to some of the West Coast's top decorating and furniture showrooms, complete with a branch of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) and two Wolfgang Puck restaurants. The Center has 130 showrooms which display and sell 2,100 interior product lines to professional interior designers, architects, facility managers, decorators and dealers, The Center hosts the annual Elton John AIDS Foundation Academy Award Party, one of the longest running of the post-Oscar parties. Located at 8687 Melrose Avenue in West Hollywood.
  • Pacific Culver Stadium Theater, Benson & Bohl Architects 2003
    The nouveau Art Deco theater palace was designed by the San Diego-based firm Benson & Bohl in 2003; the firm also designed the similarly styled Pacific Gaslamp Theater in San Diego.

    Located at 9500 Culver Boulevard in Culver City, California.
  • Pacific BMW, Ronald Frink Architects
    Silver Lake-based Ronald Frink Architects designed a four level, 200,00 sq.ft. auto dealership for Pacific BMW in Glendale, California. The exterior facade integrates exposed concrete, clear glass, metallic silver aluminum, smooth white plaster and stainless steel cables. In 2010, the firm was cited with the Glendale Beautiful Community Beautification Award. Located at 800 S. Brand Boulevard.
  • Owens-Illinois Glass Manufacturing, H.H. Brunnier 1937
    The beauty of glass in architecture is dramatically illustrated in the Vernon plant of the Owens-Illinois plant in Vernon, California. Founded in 1903 as Owens Bottle Company, the firm merged with Illinois Glass Company in 1929 to become Owens-Illinois, Inc., with headquarters in Perrysburg, Ohio. With eighty-one plants in twenty-one countries, the company had $7.4 billion in net sales in 2011. Located at 2923 Fruitland Avenue.
  • Our Lady of Sorrows Chapel
    Our Lady of Sorrows Chapel is located on the campus of the St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank California. The chapel is the gift of Josephine and Ernest Robert Meissner. Meissner is the founder of the Meissner Sewing Machine Company, which started as an industrial sewing machine manufacturer in Los Angeles and later moved to Sacramento.

    Our Lady of Sorrows is the principal devotion of the Servite Order founded in 1233 in Tuscany. The feast of the Our Lady of Sorrows originated in 1413, celebrated on the Friday after the third Sunday after Easter.


  • Our Lady of Lourdes Roman Catholic Church, Lester Scherer 1930
    Architect Lester Scherer designed the reinforced concrete church in a unique style, combining Art Deco Moderne with Spanish Revival design elements. Located at 3773 E. Third Street in the Wellington Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Otis Art Institute, William Pereira Associates 1957
    General Harrison Gray Otis was Editor and Publisher of the Los Angeles Times. In 1898 he built a Mission Revival style villa for himself stylized 'The Bivouac', it was one of the first houses on Wilshire Boulevard. Before he died in 1917, he donated his tome to Los Angeles County to be used as art school. Otis College of Art and Design became the first independent professional art school in Los Angeles established in 1918.

    Eventually the school outgrew Otis' home and by the 1950s, the home was razed in order to expand the campus. William Periera & Associates designed the new facility which opened in 1957. By 1963, the college abandoned the Westlake campus and moved to new facilities in Westchester. Since 2004, the facility has been used as an elementary school.

    Located at 2401 Wilshire Boulevard in the Westlake district of Los Angeles.
  • Osborn Architects Office, Osborn Architects (OA), 1998-99
    Award-winning home of the architectural practice, Osborn Architects in Glendale, CA. The open floor design encourages collaboration between principals, project managers and staff in an 'open mezzaninine with breakout meeting areas between workstations that allow for spontaneous conference.'

    The building extends over the parking area in a dramatic complex of truss supports and sails like some mysterious marooned vessel beckoning our exploration. The complex received immediate recognition upon completion; the 'Outstanding Architectural Improvement Award' by the City of Glendale (1999), 'Distinguished Building Award' by the L.A Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) in 1998 and the 'Merit Award' by the Pasadena and Foothill Chapter of the AIA.

    The Osborn Architects Office is located at 320 East Harvard Street in the City of Glendale, CA. The firm is directed by Timothy A. Ballard AIA, Principal, and Michael T. Pinto, Design Principal.
  • Olympic Community Police Station, Gruen Associates 2009
    The Olympic Police Station was designed by Gruen Associates to be divided by use: One side is devoted to patrol officers on duty and the other is used by administrative workers or off-duty officers. A community room is located on the first floor for local nonprofits and other organizations to use. The sleek modern design seems to be effective at fighting crime as well: In the month after the Olympic Police Station opened, violent crime in the area declined 13% and arrests increased by 60%. Located at 1130 S. Vermont Avenue in the Pico Heights neighborhood of, Los Angeles, California, 90006
  • Old Pasadena Post Office, Oscar Wenderoth 1913
    The Italian Renaissance Old Pasadena Post Office was designed by architect Oscar Wenderoth in 1913. Architects Marston and Maybury designed an addition in 1938. Located at 281 E Colorado Boulevard.
  • Old Mill of Banbury Cross c. 1907
    In the early 20th century, Adolphus Busch (of the Anheuser-Busch family) lived on a grand estate in Pasadena, California. The home overlooked the Arroyo Seco canyon, bordering Bellefontaine St. on the northern end to Madeline Dr. on the southern end. The house was enhanced by beautiful gardens, which were offered to the City of Pasadena for use as a public park in 1938. When the city refused Busch's offer, he sold the land to investors for development into private homes. Only the old Hansel and Gretel mill, which served as the tea house for the gardens remains. Located at 485 Madeline Drive in the Lower Arroyo Seco neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • Odd Fellows Temple, Morgan Walls & Clements 1924
    A handsome Spanish Churriguersque entrance on this presently-abandoned building gives a clue to the changing fortunes of fraternal societies. Designed by Morgan Walls and Clements, the reinforced concrete building features cast-concrete ornamentation.

    Although fraternal societies declined in membership from their heydey in the 1920's, membership is on the rise. The IOOF claims to be the 'largest united international fraternal order in the world' with nearly 600,000 members.

    Located at 1828 Oak Street in the Exposition Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Octagon House, 3800 Homer Street
    Originally located on San Pasqual Avenue in Pasadena; relocated to 1917 Allen Street, Pasadena in 1917, the Octagon House was built by Gilbert Longfellow and moved to Heritage Square in 1986. It one of two 8-sided houses remaining in California and the only one in Southern California. Octagonal house design was briefly in fashion in the 19th century. The site was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in 1989 (No. 413).
  • Occidental College, Weingart Center for the Liberal Arts, Myron Hunt & H.C. Chambers Architects 1925
    Established as a gift from the Weingart Foundation, the center houses the Department of Art and the Core Curriculum office. Originally designated Orr Hall, a woman's residence hall, named after Bertha Harton Orr.
  • Occidental College, Thorne Hall, Myron Hunt & H.C. Chambers, Architects 1938
    Thorne Hall was the last of Architect Myron Hunt's twenty two original buildings to be contructed on the campus of Occidental College. Erected in memory of Belle Wilbur Thorne by her husband, Charles H. Thorne, Thorne Hall is the school's main auditorium, seating 835.

    The auditorium was completely remodeled in 1989 by the firm Brenda Levin Associates, with funding provided by the James Irvine Foundation.
  • Occidental College, Johnson Student Center, Myron Hunt & H.C. Chambers, Architects 1928
    Formerly Freeman Union, the center of student life on the campus of Occidental College. The original design by Hunt & Chambers has been enlarged twice, in 1956 and 1962. The firm. Brenda Levin Associates remodeled the facility between 1997 and 1999; the college renamed the center after Robert Freeman an important trustee and generous benefactor.
  • Occidental College, Johnson Hall, Myron Hunt, Architect 1914
    Architect Myron Hunt, in association witih H.C. Chambers designed the principal buildings of Occidental College up until the-mid 30s. Johnson Hall (along with Swan and Fowler Halls) was amongst the first, completed in 1914. The overall impression of the campus architecture is one of a solidly classical nature, like the buildings you might see along Pennsylvania Avenue in our nation's capital.

    Occidental College is located at 1600 Campus Road in Eagle Rock.
  • Occidental College, Clapp Library, Myron Hunt & H.C. Chambers, Architect 1924
    The gift of Emma B. Norton in memory of her daughter, the Mary Norton Clapp Library, originally designed by Hunt & Chambers in 1924, has undergone successive expansions. In 1955, the original structure was doubled in size, adding the Carl F. Braun Memorial Fine Book Room by the Braun Family, the Jeffers Room, as a memorial to Robinson Jeffers (Class of 1905) and the Bill Henry Room, a memorial to an alumnus of the Class of '14. In 1970, furthur expansion added a four story major addition of shelf space, reading rooms, and and audio-visual center.

    Occidental College is a liberal arts college located in Eagle Rock at 1600 Campus Road. The original campus was located in Highland Park and moved to its present location in 1914.
  • O'Neill House & Pavilion, Tom Oswalt, Architect 1985-1988
    The flamboyant style of the O'Neill House and Pavilion was no doubt inspired by Antonin Gaudi, the master artist-architect who had left such a dynamic imprint on the city of Barcelona, Spain. The house was the brainchild of Don O'Neill, a dealer in art deco antiquities, who passed away in 1989, with only the parlor and a small guest house completed. Sandy O'Neill, his widow, completed the project as a tribute to her late husband.

    Located at 507 North Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills, CA.
  • O'Bryan House, Wallace Neff 1932
    Arcadia has some lovely, tree-lined streets including winding Rodeo Road on the city's north side. The shingle-clad house is a departure from the Spanish Colonial Revival typical of homes designed by Wallace Neff.

    Located at 1225 Rodeo Drive in Arcadia, California.
  • Norton Simon Museum, Thornton Ladd & John Kelsey, Architects 1969
    Originaly the Pasadena Art Museum, the museum was renamed for industrialist Norton Simon in return for absorbing the museums debts. Norton and his wife, actress Jennifer Jones were looking for a permanent home for their growing collection of over 4,000 objects.
    The distinguishing feature of the structure are the undulating walls of handmade tiles, designed by Ceramic Artisan Edith Heath.

    In 1995, Architect Frank Gehry began a major renovation of the interiors. The gardens were redesigned by Power and Associates to house the 20th century sculpture collection. A new theater was designed by Gensler & Associates, and is used for lectures, film, dance performances and concerts.

    The museum is located at 411 West Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena.


    The exterior is clad in umber-colored tiles, designed by Artist Edith Heath.
  • Norman W. Church Laboratory for Chemical Biology, Goodhue Associates 1928-1930
    The Moorish-Spanish Churrigueresque themed building is one of a pair that forms the main entrance to Cal Tech on Wilson Avenue. The principal buildings on the campus were designed by the firm of Myron Hunt and Elmer Grey in the teens; after the partnership was dissolved, Hunt continued his work on the campus until being replaced by Bertram Goodhue in 1915. After Goodhue's death in 1924, his firm continued work on the campus up until the late 30s.
  • Nickel-Leong Mansion, John C. Austin 1905
    The Greek Revival temple was designed originally for restaurateur max Nickel n 1905 by Architect John C. Austin. In 1936, Jeung Leong acquired the home; his son, Gilbert Leong was one of the first architects of Chinese descent to acquire an architect's license. The Leong family continued to own the house until the 1990s. Located at 901 Isabel Street in the Cypress Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Nichols House, Edward R. Niles Architect 1979

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    The Nichols House (and its next-door 'twin') are relatively mild design statements from Architect Edward R. Niles whose later work in Malibu is noted for its cutting edginess. I spent quite a few Sunday afternoons at the house, when my real estate partner had the listing; in 2002 I was a brand-new real estate agent just learning the complexities of the business. Too bad I didn't know the importance of the architect's work; it would have been an important enhancement to my efforts.

    The Nichols House is located at 3657 Amesbury Road. For examples of Niles' later work, the book 'Free Expression: House Design : Edward R. Niles (House Design, 4)' by Michael Webb and Edward R. Niles offers excellent insight.
  • Newcomb House c.1915
    The Airplane Bungalow style Newcomb House was built in 1914 for Dr. R. H. Newcomb. The particular style may have been originally named for its resemblance to a biplane or from the views afforded from the second story. The house was designated a Pasadena Historic Property and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1982. Located in the Pasadena Playhouse Historic District of Pasadena, California.

  • Neutra VDL Studio and Residences
    Seventy-five years ago, in Los Angeles, with a no-interest loan from Dutch philanthropist Dr CH Van Der Leeuw, Viennese-American architect Richard Neutra built a radical 'glass house' with rooftop and balcony gardens on Silverlake Boulevard. He called it the VDL Research house, after his benefactor. It was designed to accommodate his office and two families on a small 60 x 70 foot lot.

    Seven years later, as his family expanded, he built a garden house on the back of the lot. This compact wing had walls that slid open onto a pocket garden to be shared by the addition and main house. In 1963 after a disastrous fire, that left unscathed only the 1940 Garden house and basement of the original wing, Richard and his son and partner Dion Neutra had a chance to redesign the main house. Two floors and a penthouse solarium were built on the original prefabricated basement structure. They applied what the practice had learned in the interim about sun louvers, water roofs, 'nature-near', and physiologically motivated design.

    The house is open to the public without appointment on MOST Saturdays from 11:00 am to 3:00 pm (see website for dates when we are closed.) Tours are $10/person and are given by architecture students from Cal Poly Pomona.
  • Naiditch Residence, Dean Nota, Architect 1994
    Dean Nota's design for the Naiditch House evokes the image of a 'spaceship in the clouds', riding along a ridge of the San Gabriel Mountains foothills. The linear composition is laid out on split levels, literally hugging the edge of a steep precipice.

    Nota was in the first graduating class of the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI ARC) in 1973. After graduation, he interned in the office of Ray Kappe, rising to the position of Senior Associate Architect. He opened his own office in Los Angeles in 1982.

    The house is located at 3072 Zane Grey Terrace in Altadena, For a better view, drive to the end of Stonehill Drive, the street below Zane Grey). Nota's current work is more concentrated in the South Bay area of Los Angeles, where he maintains his office. For more information, please visit the firm's website (link below).
    Website:www.nota.net
  • Music Corporation of America, Paul R. Willliams 1939
    The Georgian Revival style headquarters for the Music Corporation of America (MCA) was designed by architect Paul R. Williams in 1939 for which Williams was honored by the AIA Southern California Chapter with the Award of Merit in the same year.



    MCA sold the complex to Litton Industries in 1964, hiring Williams to add a second, larger three story building and parking area in keeping with the original design concept. By 2003 2003 Platinum Equity acquired the complex.

    The building is located at 360 North Crescent Drive in Beverly Hills, California.
  • Museum of Contemporary Art, Arata Isozaki & Gruen Associates 1986








    Clad in a brilliant red Indian stone, the Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) was designed in a post-modern style by Japanese architect Arata Isozaki in 1986. Located at 250 S. Main Street in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Municipal Ferry Building, c.1941
    Streamline Moderne style building with a nautical theme, the building has served as city hall and headquartes for the Los Angeles Harbor Department. The firm Pulliam and Matthews have renovated the building for its current use as the Los Angeles Maritime Museum. Located at the east end of 6th Street at Harbor Boulevard in San Pedro. Designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1975 (No. 146).
  • Mulvihill House, Harwell Hamilton Harris, Architect 1949

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    Owner Harriet Lyle was my gracious host, visiting the house on July 28, 2010. Although Authors Gebhard and Winter (An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles) claim the house was 'remodeled', Harriet insisted everything was pretty much original. Her husband, John Tidwell Lyle (1934 - 1998) was a professor of landscape architecture at the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona)]; the Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies at Cal Poly Pomona and the Lyle plaza at the entrance to Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies at Oberlin College are named after him. He designed the gardens and a Guest House on the property (also featured on this webpage),

    Lyle is the author of such books as Regenerative Design for Sustainable Development and Design for Human Ecosystems. Lyle was the principal architect for the Lyle Center for Regenerative Studies at Cal Poly Pomona and the principal landscape architect for the Adam Joseph Lewis Center for Environmental Studies at Oberlin College. The house is located at 580 N. Hermosa Avenue in Sierra Madre.
  • Mudd Memorial Hall of Philosophy, USC, Ralph C. Flewelling, Architect 1928-29
    Described alternately as 'pre-Renaissance Tuscan' and 'Lombardy Romanesque', the Seely Wintersmith Mudd Hall of Philosophy, is (along with the statue of Tommy Trojan and the Bovard Administration Building), the most identifiable landmark associated with the University of Southern California. Designed to complement the recently completed northern Italian Renaissance architecture already in place, the Mudd Memorial Hall surpasses the others in terms of artistry and details. The two story red brick building is trimmed in cast stone and roofed in Spanish tile and crowned with a high campanile. A central fountain courtyard inviting contemplation is entered through an open cloister.
  • MPA Office Building, S. Charles Lee, Architect 1928








    Located at the busy intersection of Hollywood Boulevard and Western Avenue, the building was designed by famed theater architect S. Charles Lee in 1928, The most interesting feature is the high-relief art deco sculpture trimming the top. Los Angeles City Council President Eric Garcetti maintains a field office at the facility. Located at 5500 Hollywood Boulevard.
  • Mountain View Mausoleum, Clarence L. Jay 1935
    The historic Spanish Revival mausoleum, designed by Pasadena architect Clarence L. Jay, cost $500,000 when it was built in 1935. The solemn interior features imported Italian marble, art glass windows, ornate bronze doors and 200 mural scenes by Norwegian-born Martin Syvertsen, with life-sized figures depicting the story of Christianity.

    Among the more than 14,000 people interned here are included character actor Cy Kendall (1898-1953), George Reeves (1914-1959, Superman in the 1950s TV series); science fiction writer Octavia E. Butler (1947-2006); Black Panther leader Eldridge Cleaver (1935-1998) and physicist Richard Feynman (1918-1988). The cemetery is a popular location for movie and television filming including the TV series “Desperate Housewives, “CSI: Crime Scene Investigation” and “Six Feet Under”.

    The mausoleum is located at 2300 North Marengo Avenue in the Christmas Tree Lane neighborhood of Altadena, California.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • Mount Vernon Office, Pacific Savings, Rick Farver Associates 1960
    If it were situated on a hillside with a sweeping front lawn you might hold the replica of George Washington's Mt. Vernon home in higher regard. Set on a busy commercial corner at the north end of the MacArthur Park neighborhood, it seems more a curiosity.

    The building was original built for the now-defunct Pacific Savings and Loan and originally located up the street on the 400 block of Vermont Avenue; it is now situated at 270 North Vermont Avenue.

  • Moorcroft- Hollywood Home of Charlie Chaplin & Mary Astor (1920)
    A Moorish Fantasy in the Hollywood Hills, the former home of Charlie Chaplin and Mary Astor. Chaplin rented the house in 1921 before building his own house at 1085 Summit Drive. In 1925, Actress Mary Astor's parents, who controlled all her income at the time, purchased the house, entertaining lavishly with servants, a grand piano, a luxury car and a chauffer with disastrous results. Mary took their control away in 1930, giving them a small allowance, but they were unable to live within their means, and had to sell the house at auction for only $21,500!

    The home has been restored to its original glory with the finest of marble and mosaic finishes, stained and leaded glass windows. Besides the Moorish motif, there are also Art Noveau and Gothic details. Other special features of this magnificent home include a rooftop deck with a 360 degree view, extensive grounds with meandering pools and a waterfall. Truly a Hollywood Fantasy!

    The Moorcroft Estate is located in the Hollywood Hills at 6147 Temple Hill Drive. It is currently (September 2006) on the market for just under $9 Million Dollars. Due to its enormous size and variety of details, I will devote several photos to this great house.
  • Moorcroft- Hollywood Home of Charlie Chaplin & Mary Astor (1920)
    A footbridge allows passage over the meandering pool. The house can be seen in the distance.
  • Moorcroft- Hollywood Home of Charlie Chaplin & Mary Astor (1920)
    The Grand Portico & Entryway into the Moorcroft Estate.
  • Moorcroft- Hollywood Home of Charlie Chaplin & Mary Astor (1920)
    Detailed view of one of the four guest bedrooms. Note the elegant windows and faux finishes, Moorish style arch passageway. stenciled crown moldings, wrought iron curtain rods and Morroccan lanterns. No detail is left undone!
  • Moorcroft- Hollywood Home of Charlie Chaplin & Mary Astor (1920)
    An intimate alcove. Bridge anyone? Note the elegant and beautiful arched ceiling, and matching decorative columns and cabinets. The picture is complete with the lovely stained glass windows and rich fabrics.
  • Moorcroft- Hollywood Home of Charlie Chaplin & Mary Astor (1920)
    The Estate as seen from the carriage entrance.
  • Monastery of the Angels, Wallace Neff 1947
    Architect Wallace Neff designed the Spanish Mediterranean Style monastery for the Dominican Sisters in 1947. The cloistered order had larger numbers when it first opened; in recent years there are about twenty nuns residing here. The gift shop and chapel are open to the public; the sisters are well-known for making delicious pumpkin bread and heavenly dark chocolates.

    Located at 1977 Carmen Place in Hollywood, California.
  • Mittrey Residence, William T. Driess, Architect 1952
    The post and beam Mid-Century Mittrey Residence was designed by award-winning architect William T. Driess in 1952. The architect's designs were published in more than 25 magazines and photographed by Julius Shulman. Driess was also a talented landscape architect and author. He was a contemporary of Frank Gehry; the two worked together at the Victor Gruen Associates architecture firm in the early 1960s. The house is currently (January 2012) on the market and listed for sale for $2,499,000. Located at 2448 Glendower Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Mission San Gabriel Archangel 1791-1806
    The original mission was founded by Fr. Pedro Benito Cambon and Fr. Angel Fernandez de la Somera on September 8, 1771 alongside the Rio Hondo River in present-day Montebello, California. The current structure is the oldest building in Southern California, originally built in 1791 replaced an earlier small adobe church. Much of the building was destroyed during the earthquake of 1812, after which it was partially rebuilt. Over the years the church has suffered through several earthquakes, the last major one occurring in 1987.

    Located at 428 S Mission Drive in San Gabriel, California.
  • Minster House, Harry Gray, Architect c.1911
    Originally built as a sanitarium for tuberculosis patients, the Craftsman style building was purchased by Joseph Minster, a Los Angeles Times reporter in 1920. He was affectionately known as the 'Mayor of Mt. Washington', a result of his advocacy and support of neighborhood improvements. Located at 4163 Sea View Lane.

    Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 611) in 1994.
  • Miller & Herriott House c.1890
    East Lake Victorian believed to be the oldest surviving tract house in Los Angeles. Noted for its exquisite interiors, including a fine staircase and original fireplaces. Located at 1163 West 27th Street in the North University Park Historic Register District. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 242) in 1981.
  • Millard House, 'La Miniatura', Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect 1923
    As seen from the street.
  • Millard House 'La Miniatura'- Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect 1923
    Located on nearly an acre in Pasadena's historic Prospect District, the Millard House was Wright's first residence to utilize textile block construction. Wright designed it for Alice Millard, a dealer in antiquities in 1923. Situated in a tree-shaded glen and overlooking a lagoon, the setting is nothing short of mesmerizing. Frank Lloyd Wright Jr. designed a studio for the house in 1926; it compliments the original house in scale and composition. (Lloyd Wright also designed the landscaping). The firm, Marmol Radzinger Associates completed a recent restoration.

    The Millard House is located at 645 Prospect Crescent in Pasadena, and is currently (December 2008) listed for sale at $7,733,00. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Millard House 'La Miniatura', Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect 1923
    Texture block details of the Millard House in Pasadena.
  • Millard House 'La Miniatura'- Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect 1923
    An elevated passageway provides a dramatic view of one of the homes bedrooms.
  • Millard House 'La Miniatura', Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect 1923
    A semi-enclosed passageway leads to the main entrance.
  • Milbank House c.1910-11
    Although Santa Monica was founded, planned and plotted as early as 1875 (by city founders Senator John P. Jones and landowner Colonel Robert S. Baker) the earliest homes I have been able to locate are the half dozen or so Craftsman style homes, ringling the palisades of Santa Monica along Adelaide Drive. The Milbank House, located at 236 Adelaide Drive is an outstanding example.
  • Miguel Contreras Learning Center, Johnson Fain Architect 2006
    The Miguel Contreras Learning Complex was designed by the architectural firm Johnson Fain and completed in 2006. Originally the school was called Central Los Angeles Area New High School #10; after its opening it was renamed after Miguel Contreras, a labor union organizer. The school houses three learning communities, i.e. the Academic Leadership Community (ALC), Social Justice, and Business & Tourism (B&T) which is the largest of the three. It was built to relieve over-crowding at Belmont High School. The complex also holds a separate school called the Los Angeles School Of Global Studies ( LASGS) focusing on Project Based Learning (PBL). The school is located at 322 S Lucas Avenue in the Westlake neighborhood of Los Angeles, California.

    Scott Johnson is co-founder and Design Partner of Johnson Fain, an international architecture, planning and interior design firm. He is the author of several books, the most recent including The Big Idea: Criticality & Practice in Contemporary Architecture and Tall Building: Imagining the Skyscraper. He has taught at the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc), the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), and the University of Southern California (USC) where he was, from 2003 to 2006, the Director of the Master of Architecture Program. He has worked at The Architects' Collaborative, the firm founded by Walter Gropius, Skidmore, Owings and Merrill in the Los Angeles and San Francisco offices and at Philip Johnson & John Burgee in New York City. In 1983, he relocated to Los Angeles where he accepted the role of Design Director and Principal at Pereira Associates, formerly William L. Pereira Associates. In 1989, Johnson assumed control of the office with his former Harvard classmate, William H. Fain, Jr., and renamed and rebuilt the firm as Johnson Fain.
  • Midtown School, John Lautner, Architect 1960
    Midtown School is the only school that John Lautner designed during his career. It is currently the Los Feliz campus ot Lycee International, also known as the French American School (LILA). Located on 6.5 acres at the foot of the Shakespeare Bridge, the four separate 'pavilions' provide for airy classrooms and a low scale to suit the needs of children.

    Located at 4155 Russel Avenue in Los Feliz, the campus was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 553) by the City of Los Angeles in 1991.

    Architecture enthusiast Tad Brady, owner of the nearby Haigh House designed by Wesley Eager, advises 'the photo you have chosen for the Midtown School is of a building added to the property in 1981, along with two smaller square buildings. The new buildings, built by the Apple School which owned the property at the time, were designed to work with Lautner's buildings. Apparently the Apple School went bankrupt and the property was vacant for a time. A proposal to turn the facility and grounds into a park did not pass, and the city leased the property to the LILA.'
  • Michael Shannon Residence 1890
    Described as an Eastlake Victorian towhouse, the Michael Shannon Residence is located at 1970 Bonsallo Avenue in the historic West Adams district of Los Angeles, California.

    Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 501) in 1990.
  • Mellos Residence, Buff, Straub & Hensman 1956
    A 1956 Post & Beam by the firm Buff, Straub & Hensman, situated on the edge of the Arroyo Seco in Pasadena. The house was recently (2011) listed for sale for $1,375,000. Located at 541 Fremont Drive.

    Photo by David Stankov, used with permission.
  • Meade House (La Casa de las Campanas), Lester Scherer 1927
    Architect Lester Scherer designed the Spanish Colonial Revival style Meade House 'La Casa de las Campanas' in 1927. Architectural experts David Gebhard and Robert Winter in their authoritative 'An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles', described the house as one of the two 'most lively versions of the Mediterranean style to be built in Los Angeles in the 1920s'. The massive, thirty-seven room mansion has a three story clock tower housing four massive bells. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 239) in 1981.

    Located at 350 North June Street in the Highland Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • McTernan House., David Hyun Architect 1960; DesignVidal (remodel) 2010
    Korean-born Architect David Hyun designed the house for John T. McTernan in 1960. The house is currently (2010) undergoing an extensive restoration under the direction of Karen Vidal (DesignVidal). Located at 2226 Wayne Avenue in Los Feliz.
  • McMurran House, Frederick L. Roehrig 1911








    Mission Revival style house designed by Frederick L. Roehrig in 1911. Located at 499 Prospect Terrace in Pasadena, California.
  • McGowan House, Harry Hayden Whiteley, Architect 1929
    Architect Harry Hayden Whitely designed the Spanish Revival style house for film director Robert McGowan in 1929. The director, who began working in the film industry in 1913, became famous in the 1920s with the success of 'Our Gang', which he produced in partnership with Hal Roach. The pair eventually produced 88 one-reel silent 'Our Gang' films; McGowan directing the series until 1933. He retired from show business in 1936 and passed away in 1955.

    Located at 1928 N. Western Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • McGinnis House, Gene Verge, Architect 1929
    The Spanish Colonial Revival style house is currently (April 2013) on the market and listed for sale for $3,150,000. Described in the listing as 'Grand Old Hollywood Mediterranean Estate on a large corner lot in the Los Feliz hills. With vintage character throughout, you are greeted as you pass through the front door by a stained glass and light-filled foyer with impressive winding oak and wrought-iron staircase. Coffered ceilings and a massive fireplace grace the formal living room. Off that, a wood-paneled billiards room and window-wrapped bar lead you to the dining veranda, huge pool and yard with beautiful tiered fountain. Completing the first floor is an elegant formal dining room, kitchen with attached family room, and maid's quarters. The upstairs holds 3 bedrooms all with en suite bathrooms, along with the expansive master suite with covered terrace. Other features of this estate are a three car garage, gated off-street parking for six, a 3,000 square-foot basement currently used as a music studio, walk-in safe and near endless storage. A unique property to say the least, they don't build them like this anymore'.

    Located at 2552 N. Vermont Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • McClure House, Joseph Cather Newsom, Architect 1889
    The Victorian house was designed for W. McClure, a Director of the Garvanza Land Company, a developer in the region. The design has Queen Anne and Eastlake influences. Designated a Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument (No. 107) in 1972. Located at 432 N. Avenue 66 in the Highland Park (Garvanza) Historic District of Los Angeles.
  • McCarty Memorial Christian Church, Thomas P. Barber Paul Kingsbury, Architects 1932
    An important symbol of the civil rights movement, McCarty Memorial Christian Church, was founded as a 'white church' in 1932, and gained attention when it was integrated in the 1950s. Considered one of the 'finest examples of pure Gothic architecture in America' (as observed in the Los Angeles Times'). As demographics changed, so did the fortunes of the West Adams neighborhood; by 1954, attendance at the church had dropped from 1500 worshippers to 370 members, with 'white flight' came urban problems and a need for the church to change with the times.

    Under the leadership of pastor Kring Allen, the church was successfully integrated in 1954. The pastor invited seventy parishioners to a retreat in the San Bernardino Mountains, where they 'housed together, worked together and studied together' Allen later mused. The experience brought the congregation together. We became a completely integrated nucleus', he added.

    Dr. and Mrs. Isaac McCarty , who built and paid for the church, were avid travelers, studying church architecture as they went about Europe, with the intention of establishing a great cathedral in Los Angeles. The reinforced-concrete edifice features a 130 ft. tower with open belfry and lovely stained glass windows.

    McCarty Memorial Church is located at 4101 W. Adams Blvd. It is listed in the U.S. National Register of Historic Places. (I can imagine that Architects Barber and Kingsbury, as well as Dr. McCarty, were influenced by the design of Westminster Presbyterian Church on Lake Avenue in Pasadena, designed by Architects Marston, Van Pelt and Maybury in 1928; I had to do a double take when I first saw the McCarthy Church while visiting the West Adams neighborhood recently).
  • May Ormerod Harris Hall of Architecture & Fine Arts, Ralph C. Flewelling, Architect 1939
    A decade after Flewelling completed his signature work, the Mudd Memorial Hall of Philosophy (on the main campus of the University of Southern California), he was called upon again to design buildings for the School of Architecture. Flewelling's designs for both the Harris Hall of Architecture and Fine Arts and the adjacent Fisher Art Gallery succeeds admirably, creating a bridge between the early Romanesque buildings of the Parkinson era and two later major building programs (in the early '50's, Marsh, Smith & Powell proposed a second master plan, followed by a third master plan by the firm of William Pereira & Associates in the sxties). The Arts & Architecture complex is fittingly modernized, yet retains a strong classical element as can be seen in this view of the south entrance.
  • Mausoleum of the Golden West, Walter E. Erkes c.1935
    The Mausoleum of the Golden West is one of several PWA Moderne Classical style buildings designed by Walter E. Erkes for the Inglewood Memorial Park between 1933 and 1940. Located at 720 E. Florence Avenue · Inglewood, CA 90301.
  • Maurer House, A.F. Leicht, Architect 1922
    Architect A.F. Leicht was one of the most prolific architects during Los Angeles' 'Golden Age'; the decade before and leading up to the world-wide Great Depression. The house he designed for Dr. Amia Maurer in 1922 is referred to as 'Spanish' in the authoritative 2000 LFIA Survey; to me it reads 'Pueblo Revival'.

    Located at 1918 North Edgemont Street in the Los Feliz district of Los Angeles, California.
  • Mattison Boyd Jones House
    Growing up in Glendale, California, I often drove my bicycle or rode in the family car past this beautiful Southern plantation home which everyone that I knew affectionately referred to as 'Tara' (after the mansion in David Selznick's film 'Gone with the Wind'). Built in the Colonial Revival Style, this magnificent property was the home of the Mattison Boyd Jones family, prominent early residents of Glendale reflecting the romantic architectural style of Jones birthplace in Tuttle, Kentucky.

    In 1911, Jones moved to Glendale where he was active in the civic life of the community, serving as Chairman of the Advisory Board of the Los Angeles Trust and Savings Bank branch in Glendale and President of the Brand Boulevard Improvement Association.

    In 1922, Jones built his southern style mansion on Kenneth Road, which became known as 'Bel Aire' or the 'White House'. It has frequently been used as a background for the filming of motion pictures, television and commercials.

    The Mattison Boyd Jones House is located at 727 West Kenneth Road in Glendale, CA. It is listed in the Glendale Register of Historic Places.
  • Matthews House, Mortimer Matthews, Pulliam, Matthews and Associates 1966








    Hopefully this beautiful home will be on a Pasadena home tour one of these days and I'll be able to get a closer look. It is possible to see more of the house from the road below; however the house is too far away to get a very good photograph of it. Located at 1435 Linda Ridge Road in Pasadena, California.
  • Masonic Temple, Arthur George Lindley 1928
    The Masonic Temple designed by Arthur George Lindley of the firm Lindley & Selkirk in 1928 for the Unity Lodge, founded in 1905. When completed, the Temple was the tallest building and had the largest auditorium, the fastest elevator and the largest enclosed space in the City of Glendale.

    The firm also designed the Alexander Theater (shortened to the 'Alex' to fit on the marquee) in 1925. The property was listed as Glendale Register No. 15 in 1997. Located at 234 South Brand Boulevard.
  • Masjid Omar ibn Al-Khattab 1994
    The Omar ibn Al-Khattab mosque is part of the Omar Ibn Al Khattab Foundation, symbolizing the emergence of Islam as a major mainstream religion in Los Angeles. The mosque is the culmination of over fifteen years of effort, establishing the first place of worship for followers of Islam in Los Angeles, designed and built as a masjid. The land for Masjid Omar was bequeathed in 1977 by a mother, who fell ill and passed away, while visiting her children, students at the nearby University of Southern California.

    Located at 1025 Exposition Boulevard in the West Adams neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Mary Stowell House, Frederick L. Roehrig, Architect 1895
    Late Victorian style residence designed by Frederick L. Roehrig in 1895. Originally the house was located on Los Robles Avenue; it was moved to its current location in 1987 following an extensive restoration. Located at 107 North Orange Grove Blvd. in Pasadena, California.
  • Mary P. Field House, 4967 Sycamore Terrace, Highland Park
    This large Craftsman Style home with Swiss Chalet influences was built for Mary Field in 1903. Along with several of its neighbors, it features a beautiful wall fashioned with stones from the nearby Arroyo Seco. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1988 (No. 372).
  • Mary E. Smith House, John C. Austin c.1905
    Transitional Craftsman style house designed by prolific architect John C. Austin in 1906. Located at 1186 West 27th Street in the North University Park Historic District of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles-Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 798) in 2008.
  • Mary Andrews Clark Y.M.C.A. Residence, Arthur B. Benton, Architect 1913
    The Mary Andrews Clark Residence, designed in the French Chateau Style, is so massive that to get a good photo of it you'd need to stand a block or two away. Unfortunately, from a photographer's standpoint, many of the impressive design elements are hidden from view by mature trees. The residence was designed for Senator William Andrews Clark of Montana as a memorial to his mother.

    The Mary Andrews Clark Residence is located at 306 Loma Drive (corner of 3rd Street). It was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles in 1976 (No. 158).
  • Martin Bekins Residence, 'Chateau Emanuel' c. 1925
    Martin Bekins [of the Bekins Moving Company] built Chateau Emanuel to spend his retirement years; living in the house only a few years before passing away in 1933. The house was then sold to oil industry executive Willfred 'Bill' Lane.

    The Chateau is Eagle Rock's largest estate, currently (July 2011) listed for sale for $4.45 million. The property comes equipped with three guest houses, a bistro cafe, a pool,. croquet court, green houses, rose gardens, waterfalls, fountains, and koi ponds. Located at 1554 Hill Drive in Eagle Rock, California.
  • Mark Taper Forum, Welton Becket, Architect 1967
    The Mark Taper Forum at the Los Angeles Music Center was designed by Los Angeles architect Welton Becket in 1967, and is considered among the architect's best works. The design features a circular decorated drum with an exterior wrapped in a lacy relief design by sculptor Jacques Overhoff. The style has been described as 'New Formalism', with an emphasis on geometric shapes. The building bears a resemblance to the Carousel Theatre at Disneyland, also designed Becket and Associates the same year.
  • Mark Hall House, Mark Hall Architect 1981

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    Designed by the architect for his family, the exterior walls are formed from 'energy-efficient corrugated concrete asbestos', probably in retrospect not the ideal material. Architect Mark Hall served as president of the Los Angeles chapter, American Institute of Architects in 1985, and is also Past President of the Los Angeles Conservancy..

    Hall is co-founder and principal of Archiplan, a Los Angeles-based planning and architectural firm.

    The Mark Hall House is located at 3711 Prestwick Drive in Los Feliz.
  • Mariposa, Arthur R. Kelly 1906; Restoration, Martin Eli Weil
    Like many celebrity-owned homes tucked away in secluded canyons and dotting the hillsides and canyons of the Hollywood Hills, the Los Angeles estate of Sheryl Crow has a fascinating history. The property includes three dwellings built during three significant periods of Hollywood’s history. During the late 1890s and well into the twenties, Hollywood was not much more than a sleepy outpost with a few scattered frame houses, when Dr. Lowell C. Frost, a physician and biologist visiting from Buffalo, New York saw the land and fell in love with its rustic seclusion. He purchased the 11 acre site for the princely sum of $11 an acre, and moved into the c.1885 cottage on the property along with his wife and young son in 1906. He hired up-and-coming architect Arthur R. Kelly to design a Craftsman style house on the property, which he called 'Mariposa', Spanish for 'butterfly', after the flocks of Monarchs he found there.
    Kelly designed over 500 buildings beginning in about 1902, the year he moved to Los Angeles from Iowa. After a brief stint in the office of Greene and Greene, he opened his own office. His best known commissions include Huntington Beach High School (1908); Christie Hotel (Hollywood); William S. Hart Ranch (Newhall); Arthur Letts Estate (Holmby Hills, now known as The Playboy Mansion); Harvard-Westlake School (Bel-Air) and the Wilshire Country Club in Hancock Park. During the Lowell's ownership of the house, Actor David Niven and Composer Arnold Schonberg were their guests, staying in the cottage.
    The house was meticulously restored by Martin Eli Weil during the ownership of Film Director, Screenwriter and Producer Monty Montgomery. Weil, known for his 'scrupulous attention to detail,' passed away in 2009, was a leading restoration architect and a past president of the Los Angeles Conservancy who was involved in the restoration of landmark structures such as the El Capitan Theatre and the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Storer House.
    Sheryl Crow purchased the compound in 1996, setting up the c.1924 Spanish Colonial Revival 4 bedrooms and 3.5 bath main house on the property as her residence, where she composed many of her hits, recording 'C'mon, C'mon' in the living room. The elegantly-restored and remodeled home has a romantic two story entry with wrought iron staircase, step-down living room with original Spanish tiles, beamed ceiling and period fixtures; music room, library and 450 bottle wine cellar in 5,357 sq. ft.
    The estate is appropriately secluded from public view at the end of North Vista Street. On the other side of the privacy gates, another world exists, due in no small part to the landscape re-design by Johnny Appleseed. The award-winning landscape architect tied the properties together, adding a Brazilian ironwood footbridge, infinity pool and cabana; tee pee, campsite, playground, hiking trails, stone walls and walkways from stone quarried from the property. Walkways are lined with native plants, cacti and non-native trees and bushes popular in the nineteenth century—eucalyptus, pepper and palm trees, and towering cedars.
    The three homes on the estate have been sensitively restored, upgrading systems while preserving an authentic 'patina,' down to the smallest details, including electric switches, light fixtures, kitchen sinks and bathtubs and the spindles on the bannisters. Interior designer Roger L. Conant Williams, working closely with restoration architect Martin Eli Weil, supervised the restoration based on period photographs and the original blueprints using as much of the original as possible. In the process, he created an authentic turn-of-the-century Arts and Crafts interior, mixing vintage appliances, original Gustav Stickley furnishings, family heirlooms and faithful period reproductions.
    Although Sheryl Crow’s home base is in Nashville, over the years she has spent plenty of time in her unique Los Angeles home. Often during the holidays each house was filled with family and friends, who enjoyed the park like grounds, hiking trails, and hillside palm covered palapas.
    The property is currently on the market and listed for sale for $15,950,00. The furnishings are also available, excluding the art. Myra Nourmand and Joanne Vuylsteke of Nourmand and Associates Beverly Hills have the listing.
  • Mar Vista House, Gregory Ain (Ain, Johnson & Day) 1946-48
    Another example from the Mar Vista Project; this one located at 3508 Moore Street.
  • Mar Vista House, Gregory Ain (Ain, Johnson & Day) 1946-48
    In the dynamic growth of post World War II Los Angeles, Architect Gregory Ain's experiments in low-cost, multi-family housing stand out as his greatest contribution. The Mar Vista project followed the success of the Park Planned Homes development, twenty-eight single family homes on Highview Avenue in Altadena, CA (1946).

    The Mar Vista project was even more ambitious; fifty-two houses in all, dissimilar from one another by 'turning the houses in different directions'. Ain used a simple post-and-beam system with clerestory windows and a sliding panel between one of the bedrooms and the living room, providing a sense of openness in the small (1,050 sq. ft.) homes.

    Gregory Ain's Mar Vista Homes are located between Beethoven, Moore and Meier Streets, south of Marco Place. The above house, located at 3556 Moore Street, exemplifies the style.
  • Manual Arts High School, John and Donald B. Parkinson Architect 1934-35
    The father-and-son team of John and Donald Parkinson produced some of Los Angeles most enduring architecture between 1920 and 1945, including the Master Plan for the campus of the University of Southern California (1919-1937), Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum (1923 & 1930-31), Bullock's Wilshire (1929) and Union Station (1939). The horizontal, parallel details and rounded corners of the school's buildings are evidence of the Streamline Moderne style, a favorite of the firm during the 25-year partnership of father and son.

    'The campus buildings are a second incarnation; the firm designed the original school, then also designed the second version which is what we see today.' according to Scott Field, Executive Director of the Parkinson Archives.

    Manual Arts High School is located at 4131 S. Vermont Avenue in the West Adams district of Los Angeles.
  • Mansion Adena (Lewis Cottage), attributed to Eugene Getschell c.1886
    Acclaimed by Architectural Digest Editor Elizabeth McMillan as 'the finest example of Victorian architecture in Southern California', Lewis Cottage was owned by Anna and Henry Lewis, a prominent founding family of Pasadena.

    As of 1900, the property was the residence of Anna Luckey, an early advocate for social welfare services and author of children's books. Mrs. Luckey started the first social sevice agency for Pasadena's poor, and as a result, Pasadena became one of the first cities in the nation to have its own welfare department.

    The firm CM Design has completed a recent extensive restoration. The house is located at 361 Adena Street in north Pasadena.
  • Mandarin Plaza, Hai C Tan Architect 1972
    I stumbled upon the nearly vacant Mandarin Plaza while parking my car to take photos of the Eugene Kinn Choy-designed properties, located across the street. Business appears to be less-than-booming on the north end of New Chinatown; regrettably a sign of the (economic) times.

    The only other reference I have been able to find (so far) on the architect is the Jack C. Lee Residence, Hai C. Tan, Architect, 1969 in Silver Lake located at 1933 Redcliff Street.

  • Malin House 'The Chemosphere', John Lautner, Architect, 1961
    Lautner built this house for Leonard Malin, an aircraft electronics engineer short on money but high on imagination. Malin gave the architect a budget of $30,000, a sum that was agreed upon and construction began in May 1959. The house is today considered one of the great architectural icons of Los Angeles.

    The Chemosphere, which resembles a flying saucer (and is sometimes mistaken for one) is located at 7776 Torreyson Drive in the Hollywood Hills. It can best be seen from the corner of Flynn Ranch Road and Torreyson Drive or directly across the street at 7777 Torreyson Drive. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 2004 (No. 785).
  • Madame Tussauds Wax Museum, Michael Rotondi and John Ash, RoTo Architects 2009
    RoTo Architects and the John Ash Group design for Madame Tussauds Wax Museum in Hollywood looks toward the future while reflecting on its glorius past. Drawing on the tradition of the nearby iconic Egyptian and Chinese Theaters, RoTo principal Michael Rotondi's have set back the theaters with forecourts that offer a place for theater-goers to gather before the show, or accommodate a crowd before a gala premiere.

    Visitors to Tussauds enter through roll-up glass doors; gray-brown zinc scales with projecting fins clad the walls, creating a play of shadows. A folded screen of perforated metal spans two wings, tying the composition together. A staircase leads to an overlook, with a catwalk linking to a rooftop party space looking over the boulevard and the historic skyline of Hollywood. Located at 6933 Hollywood Boulevard.
  • Mackey Apartments, R.M. Schindler, Architect 1939
    The genius of Schindler's multiple family dwellings is that they are designed with a sense of complex individuality; anyone lucky enough to live in one experiences a sense of living in an exceptional space. Private outdoor spaces or balconies, custom, built-in furniture, variable ceiling heights and natural light all play a part.

    The Apartments were purchased by the Republic of Austria in 1995. Restoration work began immediately, and continued in 2001 and 2004 under the direction of Space International architects. The apartments are open for viewing the first Friday of each month from 11:00 am to 6:00 pm. Please call 323 651 1510 for more information or to make a reservation.

    Located at 1137-1141 S. Cochran Avenue in Los Angeles, California.
  • MacGowan House, Hudson & Munsell, Architects 1913; Parkinson Field Associates (Restoration)
    Desinged for the first commissioner of the Los Angeles Health Department, Dr. Grandville MacGowan, by the firm Hudson & Munsell, completed in 1913. At the time of its completion, West Adams was one of the most fashionable neighborhoods in the city; the mansion suffered various uses in the intervening years.

    The property was purchased by a religious order in 2002, for a seminary and educational facility, hiring Parkinson Field Associates for extensive restoration between 2002 and 2005, including the exterior and interiors, carriage house and grounds.

    Located at 3726 West Adams Blvd.; Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1990 (No. 311). The firm, Hudson & Munsell also designed the Cohn Residence (LA Historic-Cultural Monument No. 84) and the Thomas Potter Residence (LA Historic-Cultural Monument No. 327); all three monuments show influence of the Tudor Revival style.
  • MacArthur Park est.1880s
    MacArthur Park originally named Westlake Park, was built in the 1880s as a drinking water reservoir connected to Los Angeles' Zanja water system, consisting of gravity-fed trenches which delivered water from its source to the inner city. When the system was abandoned for a more efficient pressurized pipe system, the reservoirs were converted into parks.

    The park honors General Douglas MacArthur and was designated a Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument in 1972 (No. 100). The lake is fed by natural springs; an artificial bottom to the lake was laid during the construction of the Metro Red Line which opened in 1993.

    The park is located south of Wilshire Boulevard and west of South Alvarado Street in the Westlake district of Los Angeles.
  • Lynch House- Architect Unknown
    An era of unparalleled optimism reached its zenith in Southern California in the 'Roaring 20's'. In the foothills of the Verdugo Mountains, the Rossmoyne section of Glendale experienced a period of extravagant home-building, as the well-to-do established a neighborhood of finely turned-out homes. This Spanish Colonial home is located at 1230 Rossmoyne Avenue and was built in 1924.

    In 2005, the Glendale Historical Society placed the 'Lynch House' on the Glendale Register of Historical Places.
  • Lulu Hlaffer Residence, Rufus Buck, Architect 1924
    Storybook Tudor Style residence designed for Lulu Hlaffer in 1924 by Architect Rufus Buck. The house was featuered in 'Day Dream Houses of Los Angeles', by Charles Jencks, c.1978, noting the 'sinister, snaking timbers and creepy, upturned roof.'

    Located at 2574 Glendower Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Lukens House, Harry Ridgeway c.1915
    Theodore Parker Lukens (1848 – 1918) was an American conservationist, real estate investor, civic leader, and forester often referred to as the 'Father of Forestry.' He served two terms as mayor of Pasadena, the first term between 1890 and 1892. His second term (1894-1895) after his refusal to support a franchise allowing the Southern Pacific Railroad a rail line through the Arroyo Parkway Lukens remained prominent in civic and conservation issues until his death in 1918.
    Lukens has been memorialized with a mountain, Mt. Lukens being named after him. The mountain is the highest point within Los Angeles’ city limits at an elevation of 5,066 feet. Robert Bradford Marshall, a 30-year veteran of the US Geological Survey named a lake in Yosemite National Park for Lukens in 1894. The Lukens family home on 267 N. El Molino Avenue in Pasadena was added to the National Register of Historic Places on March 29, 1984. The house was designed by Harry Ridgeway, who also designed the Woodbury House in Altadena in 1898, the city jail and some of Pasadena's early churches.


  • Loyola Law School, William M. Rains Law Library, Frank O. Gehry & Associates, Architects 1981-1984
    The campus of Loyola Law School is a bit of a world-unto-itself, sequestered in an urban setting east of MacArthur Park. Occupying an entire city block, the project gave Gehry the opportunity to explore the idea of a modern 'acropolis', in reference to the 'ancient traditions and architecture of law'. The collonade of the Darling Pavilion and Rains Law Library suggest a post-modern interpretaton of a Roman forum.

    The campus of Loyola Law School is located at 1441 West Olympic Blvd. in the neighborhood east of MacArthur Park.
  • Loyola Law School, Fritz B. Burns Academic Center, Frank O. Gehry,Architect 1981-84
    In the Burns Academic Center, Architect Gehry offers a surprising composition; a zigzagging staircase 'crashes' the mustard-yellow facade, creating a dramatic focal point. A central atrium features a floor-to-ceiling bas relief, depicting the fall of Icarus. Gehry chose the work to represent the striving for 'justice, human failure and equally inevitable renewal of human hope.'

    Fritz B. Burns was a real estate developer and philanthropist who had a great love for Loyola Law School; he was a generous supporter of the school until his death in 1979. The school is located at 1441 W. Olympic Blvd. in the neighborhood east of MacArthur Park.
  • Loyola High School of Los Angeles, Albert C. Martin, Architect 1918
    Founded in 1865 as St. Vincent's College, Loyola High School is the oldest high school in Southern California, predating the University of California. Roman Catholic Bishop Thaddeus Amat, a member of the Vincentian order, presided over the Los Angeles Archdiocese at the time of the school's founding. In 1911, the management of the school was handed over to the Jesuits, and the school was moved from its original location in downtown Los Angeles to Highland Park. In 1918, the school moved to the Harvard Heights neighborhood, renaming the school Loyola College in honor of St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit order.

    The facility housed high school, college and law school until 1929, at which time the Jesuits purchased additional property, moving the law school to a campus west of downtown and the college to Westchester. The college today is known as Loyola Marymount University.

    The school was designed by architect Albert C. Martin in the Collegiate Gothic style. Due to its proximity to Hollywood and its classical architecture, the campus has been used as a location in numerous films, including 'Donnie Darko', 'Coach Carter' and 'Thank You For Smoking'. Prominent alumni include billionaire real estate investor Edward P. Roski, John Shea (Shea Construction, builder of the Hoover Dam and the San Francisco BART), real estate tycoon Thomas Baruch, and veteran newsman Stan Chambers (KTLA Channel 5).

    Loyola High School of Los Angeles is located at 1901 Venice Blvd. in the Harvard Heights neighborhood.
  • Lovell Health House, Richard Neutra, Architect 1927-29
    Richard Neutra was introduced to Dr. Phillip M. Lovell, a strong advocate for a holistic approach to life by his colleague Rudolf Schindler. Dr. Lovell hired Neutra to remodel his medical and consulting office, and later gave him the commission to build his famous Health House in Los Feliz. Visiting it today, (February 2006) it looks as fresh and new as it did when Neutra completed it in 1929. Built entirely of glass and steel, the Lovell House is considered one of Neutra's greatest achievements.

    The Lovell Health House is located in Los Feliz at 4616 Dundee Drive. In 1974, it was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles (No. 123).
    It is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Lovell Health House, Richard Neutra, Architect 1927-29
    I had the pleasure of meeting Betty Topper the current owner of the Lovell Health House recently as I was setting up the itinerary for the French Institute of Architects Tour of Los Angeles Modernism during October 2008. Betty was kind enough to let the group tour her home during their visit, which proved to be a highlight of the day. I am pleased to present a photo of the interior of the main living area, Note the ceiling to floor windows and the small round light in the room divider; the light is an actual headlight from a 1928 Ford automobile!

    The Lovell Health House is located at 4616 Dundee Drive in Los Feliz.
  • Lovell Health House, Richard Neutra, Architect 1927-29
    View from the top level.
  • Louis Denker House, B. Cooper Corbett, Architect 1912
    Architect Benjamin Cooper Corbett Corbett had a successful architectural practice in the Los Angeles area, flourishing between 1900 and 1915. He favored the Beaux-Arts style with its European sentimentalities. The Denkin House is a prominent example of his work. Other examples include the Los Feliz estate of Cecil B. DeMille (1912) the Elizabethan style home for Adrian Loeb in Pico Heights, and the Mary V. Elliott House in Pasadena (1912).

    The Denker House is located at 3820 W. Adams Blvd. in Exposition Park. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 591) in 1994.
  • Los Feliz Manor Apartments, Jack Grundfor, 1929
    Architectural historian Laura Massino Smith describes this building as a 'lovingly preserved apartment building with Mayan influences featuring turquoise-glazed terra cotta decoration, and filigree-like metal grillwork. Inside, Murphy beds pop out of the wall in very small studio apartments.'

    The Los Feliz Manor Apartment Building is located at 4643 Los Feliz Boulevard in Los Feliz.

    Incidentally, Laura Massino Smith has written great little guide books on Los Feliz and other Los Angeles neighborhoods AND conducts very interesting personal guided tours of Los Angeles architecture. For more information, visit Laura's website. (See link below).
  • Los Angeles Times Building, Gordon B. Kaufmann, Architect 1934
    Best known as the architect of the Hoover Dam, Kaufmann (1888-1949) arrived in California in 1914, and established his early reputation with the designs for Scripps College between 1927 and 1930. His early designs were almost exclusively in the Mediterranean Revival style. In 1928, he completed the Athenaeum, a private club on the campus of California Institute of Technology.

    Later in his career, Kaufmann's projects were primarily in the Moderne style; the Los Angeles Times Building is a perfect example. The building won a Gold Medal for Architecture at the 1937 Paris Exposition. The Globe Lobby features murals by Hugo Balin, who also painted the murals in the rotunda of the Griffith Park Observatory. Balin's work represent the Los Angeles of the 1930s in a profound way, and are collectively some of the finest murals in the west.

    The Los Angeles Times Building is located at 220 W. First Street in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Los Angeles Police Department Administration Building, Paul Danna & Jose Palacios, Architects 2009
    A visit to downtown Los Angeles is a rewarding experience; the revitalization of the city's historic core, coupled with recent new construction is a heady experience for the architecture enthusiast. The Los Angeles Police Department, which held its ribbon-cutting grand opening party yesterday, October 24, 2009 is a prime example.

    A one-acre park sets the new facility back from the street, providing much-appreciated green space. Architects Paul Danna and Jose Palacios (AECOM) worked with Melendrez Landscape Architects to create a pedestrian-friendly main plaza.

    The new LAPD Headquarters building is located at 100 South Spring Street in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Los Angeles Museum of the Holocaust, Hagy Belzberg Architect 2011








    In observance of National Holocaust Week, Donna and I joined a group of friends for a tour of the Los Angeles Holocaust Museum on April 28, 2011. Set on a wedge of parkland between Pan Pacific Park and Farmer's Market, you might actually miss seeing it. Barely rising above ground level, the museum is mostly below grade, reminding me of the megalithic passage tomb mound I observed on a visit to Newgrange on the eastern side of Ireland. The undulating walls and walkways of the museum mimic the rolling landscape of the park. Inside the exhibits are a sober reminder of the evils mankind is capable of. Everyone should experience it!

    Located at 100 South The Grove Drive in the Fairfax neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Los Angeles Metropolitan Detention Center, Ellerbe Becket & Louis Naidorf 1988
    The Metropolitan Detention Center (MDC) in Los Angeles, California, is a correctional facility for male and female inmates designed by a joint venture of century-old Ellerbe Becket Arcitecture and Louis Naidorf, Dean, School of Architecture and Design at Woodbury University. The complex structure with its narrow slit windows (designed for security) has two wings, presumably designed to separate the men from the women (or perhaps the most violent from the less so) connected by horizontal bridges. If you have been unlucky enough to have spent a night or two here, perhaps you can describe the details with more authority. Located at 635 North Alameda Street in downtown Los Angeles.



  • Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, John & Donald Parkinson, Architects, 1923
    As early as 1910, talk was often heard of constructing a great sports stadium at Exposition Park. At a meeting of the California Fiesta Association in 1919, the idea was proposed that a 'colosseum' be built to honor those who had given their lives in WWI. The following year, the name was changed to 'Coliseum' with John Parkinson selected as architect. Construction began in late 1921 and completed in the spring of 1923. The total cost of the project was $800,000.

    The years 1930-32 saw a major expansion for the 1932 Olympic Games. The stadium, which originally had a capacity of 75,000 was enlarged to 101,574 seats. A press box was added in 1948, followed by a replacement track in 1966 and a new computerized scoreboard in 1972. The 1984 Olympics lead to furthur enhancements.

    Besides the two olympiads, the venue has been the site of many memorable events. Pope John Paul II gave a Papal Mass in 1987. The Los Angeles Dodgers, after relocating from Brooklyn, NY used the stadium between 1958 and 1962. It was the site of John F. Kennedy's acceptance speech to be the Democratic Party's presidential nominee in 1960. Since 1923, it has been the home of USC Trojans Football.

    The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum is located at 3911 S. Figueroa Street in Exposition Park.
  • Los Angeles Free Clinic, Thom Mayne & Michael Rotundi (Morphosis) 1989-90
    The Los Angeles Free Clinic is the oldest of its kind in the United States. It became the Saban Free Clinic ias a result of a gift from philanthropists Haim and Cheryl Saban.who endowed the clinic with a $10-million donation in 2008, the largest in its 41-year history,

    The clinic is located at 8405 Beverly Boulevard in West Hollywood, California.
  • Los Angeles First National Bank Building, Meyer & Holler. Architects 1927
    Designed by the same firm that brought us the Egyptian and Chinese Theaters, the building was the tallest in Hollywood when it was completed in 1927. Combining French Chateauesque and Art Deco styles, the structure forms an integral part of Hollywood's entertainment district. Located at 6777 Hollywood Blvd.
  • Los Angeles Fire Station No. 27, Peter K. Schabarum, Designer 1930
    When completed in 1930, the station was the largest west of the Mississippi. The Mediterranean style structure was designed by Peter Schabarum, and now functions as the LAFD Historical Society Museum (est. 2000), William Rolland, LAFD Medal of Valor Recipient, Founder..

    Dedicated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1976 (No. 165), the station is located at 1355 N. Cahuenga Blvd. in Hollywood.

  • Los Angeles Fire Station 82, RRM Design Group 2011
    A new $30 million, 32,000-square-foot green-roofed fire station replaced the old, smaller station on Bronson Avenue. Designed by RRM Design Group, the LEED-certified building features a roof garden with a rainwater capture system that treats the water and also helps keep the building cool and saves energy. Located on the northeast corner of Van Ness and Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California.
  • Los Angeles Department of Water & Power Building, Albert C. Martin & Associates 1963



    Designed by Albert C. Martin and Associates, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power Building, now known as the John Ferraro Building, opened in May 1965 at a cost of $32 million, financed by department revenue. The 17-story, 880,537 square-foot building is a visual statement about the power of the organization, designed for energy efficiency and cost effectiveness.

    The façade allows light from inside the building to glow at night; the overhangs at each level provide visual detail while minimizing the amount of sunlight that impacts the glass, reducing heat penetration and the need for air conditioning. The pool and fountains form a moat around the building, recirculating the water and providing about one-third of the building's air conditioning needs. Located at 111 N. Hope Street in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, Allied Architects, 1928-1933









    Los Angeles County-USC Medical Center, Allied Architects, Edwin Bergstom, Myron Hunt, Pierpont Davis, Sumner P. Hunt & William Richards Architects 1928-1933. Easily the most recognizable landmark on Los Angeles' eastside, the hospital is twenty stories high and towers over the adjoining neighborhood. The style reflect the PWA Monumental Moderne, highly popular in the public architecture of the 1930's. The high relief sculptures adorning the facade are reminiscent of Bertram G. Goodhue's Los Angeles Central Library.

    Located at 1200 N. State Street.
  • Los Angeles City Hall- John Parkinson, John C. Austin & Albert C. Martin, Architects 1928
    Rising 454 feet in height, Los Angeles' City Hall was the tallest building in the city until 1964 due to seismic concerns. Modern building methods and a seismic retrofit have changed all that, however, the building remains a temple of classic proportions, and an enduring symbol of the city.

    The tower is still the tallest base-isolated structure in the world, allowing the building to withstand an earthquake up to an 8.2 magnitude. Concrete used in the construction process utilized sand from each of California's 58 counties and water from twenty-one historic missions. The tower shows the influence of the adjacent Richard Riordan Central Library (designed by Bertam Goodhue in 1926) and is said to be inspired by the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

    Los Angeles City Hall is located at 200 N. Spring Street in downtown Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Monument in 1976 (No. 150).
  • Los Altos Hotel & Apartments, Edward B. Rust, Architect 1925








    Spanish Colonia Revival style apartment building designed by Edward B. Rust in 1926. It has been the home of many notables including William Randolph Hearst, Marion Davies and Clara Bow. It is rumored that Judy Garland and Charlie Chaplin also lived here for a time. Architect Julia Morgan, designer of theHerald-Examiner Building and Hearst Castle in San Simeon designed the apartments for Hearst and Davies in the building.

    Designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1925, the building is also on the National Register of Historic Places. Located at 4121 Wilshire Boulevard in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Lingenbrink House, Jock Peters Architect 1930
    Architect Jock Peters designed the International Moderne style house for architecture authority William Lingenbrink in 1930. Lingengbrink was founder of Park Moderne, a rural getaway created for his Bohemian pals located in Calabasas, California. With partner C. Henry Taylor, Lingenbrink owned art galleries catering to wealthy clients, including many in the film industry. Lingenbrink was also closely associated with Rudolph Schindler; the architect designing for him the Calabasas cabin in 1929 and stores in Studio City between 1939 and 1941.

    Located at 2000 Grace Avenue in the Whitley Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, a National Historic District designated in 1982, for its 'architecture, community planning and unique theatrical history.'.
  • Lingenbrink Cabin, Rudolph M. Schindler 1929
    Architect Schindler designed three houses for William Lingenbrink in Park Moderne, an experimental village founded by Lingenbrink as a rural getaway for his Bohemian pals and various patrons of the arts in the 1930s. Only the cabin at 3978 Blackbird Way remains. A subsequent builder-owner (sensitively) expanded the small cabin into what we see today. Lingengbrink, with partner C. Henry Taylor, owned art galleries catering to wealthy clients, including many in the film industry. Schindler also designed art galleries and shops for Lingenbrink in Studio City between 1939 and 1941.
  • Lincoln Heights Branch Library, Hibbard & Cody, Architects 1916
    Italian Renaissance style public library located at 2530 Workman Street in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles. The library was one of more than 2500 funded by Andrew Carnegie. between 1883 and 1929, the majority of which were built in the United States.
  • Lincoln Avenue Methodist Church, George W. Kramer, Architect 1897
    Orignally located at 732 N. Orange Grove Blvd. in Pasadena, the church was moved to Heritage Square in 1981. The architect, who also built the church, designed the building in a 'Carpenter Gothic' style; there are Queen Anne and Neoclassical influences in the style.

    Located at 3800 Homer Street in Heritage Square, the church was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1981 (No. 178).
  • Levin House, Rudolph M. Schindler, Architect 1925
    Schindler remodeled an existing house for Hyman Levin in 1925, adding more rooms as the family grew. The house was restored by Stephanos Polyzoides in 1984. Original landscaping designed by Richard Neutra has matured to the extent that the house is barely visible from the street. Located at 2673 Dundee Place in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Levin House, Brenda Levin, Architect 1982
    Architect Brenda Levin designed her personal residence in a contempoarty style in 1982. The architect has been charged with the restoration of some of Los Angeles' most important historic landlmarks, including the Bradbury building, the Wiltern Theatre, Grand Central Market and the late-1920s Oviatt and Fine Arts office buildings, the . Griffith Observatory and the transformation of the former St. Vibiana's Cathedral into a performing arts center.

    Located at 3654 Shannon Road in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Leonis Adobe, Miguel Leonis c.1870s
    The Monterey Colonial style Leonis Adobe, originally built in 1844, was the home of Miguel Leonis, one of Los Angeles' most influential and colorful pioneers. Leonis, a wealthy rancher, purchased the adobe in the 1870s, adding gingerbread details. He lived in the house until his death in 1889. The house was nearly razed after falling into disrepair, the result of a lengthy legal disputed between Leonis' heirs. It was saved as a result of preservation efforts to have the home declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Landmark (No. 1; the first structure in Los Angeles receiving the designation) in 1962. The house has been lovingly restored and is currently operating as a museum. The adobe is listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. Located at 23537 Calabasas Rd., Calabasas, California
  • Leistikow House, Paul R. Williams 1923
    Architect Paul R. Williams designed the English brick Tudor style house in the same year he launched his private architectural practice. Located at 554 S. Lorraine Boulevard in the exclusive Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Leiberman House, Glen Howard Small, AIA c.1989 + Anthony Eckelberry 1995-
    As an architecture buff, I take no small pride in knowing a thing or two about the architecture in and around Los Feliz, so it came as a great surprise when I stumbled upon the John Lautner-inspired Leiberman House on Prospect Avenue, originally designed by Glen Howard Small in 1989. Perhaps one of the least known mastermind's of contemporary architecture, the architect demonstrated early promise while an undergraduate at the University of Oregon, where he was awarded the Eliel Saarinen Scholarship for the Masters of Architecture program at the Cranbrook Academy of Arts and Institute of Sciences. After graduation (1967) he worked for various architectural firms including John Lautner and Smith and Williams. After a three year stint as assistant professor at Cal Poly Pomona School of Environmental Design, he joined a group of fellow architects to co-found the Southern California Institute of Architects (SCI-Arc) in 1972 where he taught for the next 18 years.

    In the Leiberman House the original owners commissioned a creative addition to their home, described by the architect as a 'a dingbat Spanish house that had no character.' The resultant 'face lift' consists of 'a series of quarter curves in two different directions', the architect's attempt at bringing 'sensuous, flowing curves to life' in a residential setting. The wall of the house have been sculpted in such a way as to eliminate the need for a roof, leaving the interiors open to the heavens and 'exalted by its light.' The house was purchased by Estela Mara Bensimon and Agapito Diaz in 1995. Dr. Bensimon who is co-director of the Center for Urban Education at the USC Rossier School of Education states that 'when we purchased the house in 1995 from the Liebermans, the house was kind of half finished, i.e. nothing had been done beyond the living room. Over time, with the help of Los Feliz-based architect Anthony Eckelberry, we remodeled the rest of the house, tore down some walls, changed all the windows to take advantage of the openness of the design. As fate would have it, Eckelberry was a student of Glen Howard Small at SCI-Arc, so the remodel was faithful to the original vision.'

    Small currently lives in Managua, Nicaragua where he has recently completed three projects of national importance, the Concha Acustica, the centerpiece of the Nicaraguan national cultural plaza; the Journalist Rotunda, a monument to the journalists of the Sandinistan Revolution, and the Colon Rotunda, a fountain in the city's civic center. In 2002, Glen Small's daughter Lucia Small made an award-winning documentary film on his work, 'My Father the Genius'.
    The Leiberman House is located at 3995 Prospect Avenue in the Franklin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles.


  • Leiberman House, Glen Howard Small, AIA c.1989

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    Perhaps one of the least known mastermind's of contemporary architecture, Architect Glen Howard Small currently lives in Managua, Nicaragua where he has recently completed three projects of national importance, the Concha Acustica, the centerpiece of the Nicaraguan national cultural plaza; the Journalist Rotunda, a monument to the journalists of the Sandinistan Revolution, and the Colon Rotunda, a fountain in the city's civic center. The architect demonstrated early promise while an undergraduate at the University of Oregon, where he was awarded the Eliel Saarinen Scholarship for the Masters of Architecture program at the Cranbrook Academy of Arts and Institute of Sciences. After graduation (1967) he worked for various architectural firms including John Lautner and Smith and Williams. After a three year stint as assistant professor at Cal Poly Pomona School of Environmental Design, he joined a group of fellow architects to co-found the Southern California Institute of Architects (SCI-Arc) in 1972 where he taught for the next 18 years.
    In the Leiberman House the owners commissioned a creative addition to their home, described by the architect as a 'a dingbat Spanish house that had no character.' The resultant 'face lift' consists of 'a series of quarter curves in two different directions', the architect's attempt at bringing 'sensuous, flowing curves to life' in a residential setting. The wall of the house have been sculpted in such a way as to eliminate the need for a roof, leaving the interiors open to the heavens and 'exalted by its light.' In 2002, Glen Small's daughter Lucia Small made an award winning documentary film on his work, My Father the Genius.
    The Leiberman House is located at 3995 Prospect Avenue in the Franklin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Lawrence Segal House, Hyun & Cohn Architects 1955
    I have passed this lovely mid-century home hundreds of times on my way to the hiking trails of Griffith Park, admiring its understated beauty. Recently I was lucky enough to encounter the owner in the driveway, and complimenting the design of her home asked, Do you happen to know who designed it?' After a moment's hesitation, she replied, 'Some Korean guy'.

    My mind quickly traveled to my first encounter with architect David Hyun. I had met David on the streets of Silver Lake in 2003, while campaigning for the Governing Board of the Silver Lake Neighborhood Council. David was kind enough to invite me into his home, where he told me his life story. (you can read about it in 'Who's Who in Silver Lake: David Hyun, Architect and Idealist'). The visionary architect is credited with the revitalizaton of Little Tokyo in the 1970's. HIs greatest architectural acheivement was the establishment of the Japanese American Cultural Center in 1978, transforming an urban slum into a thriving urban community. His personally designed residence in Silver Lake is located at 1954 Redesdale Avenue (details in the SILVER LAKE ARCHITECTURE page).

    The Lawrence Segal House is located at 3626 Cadman Drive in Los Feliz.

  • Laurelwood Apartments, Rudolph M. Schindler 1948
    During a long and productive career Architect Rudolph.M. Schindler designed four apartment complexes including the Laurelwood Apartments in Studio City, California. The complex consists of two separate buildings separated by a central walkway. Each building has five, two unit apartments with the ground level units having semi-private gardens and the upper level units having roof decks. He created a two-level complex split into a pair of separate buildings each containing five, two-unit blocks on either side of a central walkway. Schindler gave the ground apartments garden patios, while the upper ones got roof decks. The complex has endured hardships over the years, nearly being bulldozed a couple of times. Seeing it yesterday everything seemed to be in good order; the exterior looked as if it had been freshly painted, and in the original blue-green color, a favorite of the architect.

    The Laurelwood is a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 228) designated in 1980. Located at 11833-11837 Laurelwood Drive.
  • Lane-Wells Company, William E. Myer 1938-39
    The industrial regions of south Los Angeles, including the communities of Vernon and Huntington Park, have some pretty amazing monuments to the Streamline Moderne style. The Lane-Wells complex is one of the best, although a bit forlorn-looking in its present state. Robert Winter and David Gebhard, in their seminal work, 'An Architectural Guidbook to Los Angeles' describe the facility, '...the buildings were arranged in a park-like setting so that when one enters the plant nothing reminds him of manufacturing, for beautiful flowers and shrubs, well-kept grounds and distinctive buildings have removed the stigma of the old-fashioned factory.'

    Located at 5610 South Soto Street in Highland Park, California.
  • Lane House (Magic Castle) Dennis & Farwell 1909
    Chateau style residence originally built for financier Rollin Lane and based on the design of Kimberly Crest (also designed by Dennis & Farwell), a grand house in Redlands, California, where Lane owned an orange grove. Dennis & Farwell were among the city's top architectural firms at the turn of the century, continuing up until the mid-teens. The Jans House (HCM# 227) and the Magic Caste (HCM# 406) both in Hollywood; the Erasmus Wilson Residence at Chester Place, and a Queen Anne style mansion for oil executive Charles C.L. Leslie in Westlake were among their many achievements.

    Located at 7001 Franklin Avenue in Hollywood.
  • Lake Hollywood, William Mulholland, Engineer 1924
    Picturesque man-made reservoir located in Weid Canyon, east of the Cahuenga Pass. Built under the supervision of William Mulholland, the City Engineer charged with building the system of aqueducts and reservoirs that provide most of the drinking water for Los Angeles. The dam is 210 feet high, 933 feet long and 16 feet wide at the crest with a maximum depth of 183 feet. It has a capacity to hold more than 2.5 billion gallons of water.
  • Laing House, Harwell Hamilton Harris 1935
    Harris designed the house for Graham Laing, an economic professor at nearby California Institute of Technology (Caltech). Although Laing was a personal friend or Harris' mentor, Richard Neutra, he elected not to employ him in the design of his house, choosing instead his protégé, who they presumed would be more flexible. In the Laing House, the architect combines both the influence of Neutra and Frank Lloyd Wright into a uniquely Harris composition; Wright in the deep, overhanging eaves and ribbon windows and Neutra in the overall scheme. Declared a Pasadena Historic Landmark (No. 430) in 2009 in the Poppy Peak Historic District.

    Located at 1540 Poppy Peak Drive in the Lower Arroyo Seco neighborhood of Pasadena, California.

  • Lago Vista Condominiums, Allyn E. Morris, Architect 1973

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    With the publication of 'Forgotten Modern', highlighting the achievement of his first residential design, (Bubeck House in Eagle Rock (1956) architect Allyn E. Morris is finally getting some much deserved recognition.

    Although he was an integral member of the L.A. Group of 12, Morris' designs were not widely recognized.during his lifetime. (Morris passed away on July 31, 2009 in Fresno). The Lago Vista Condominiums represent some of Morris' best work, a preference for dynamic 'Bauhaus-inspired' design, multi-level, interlocking shapes and contours instead of the minimalism found in most architecture of the period.

    No less than seven of Morris' architectural achievements are noted in David Gebhard and Robert Winter's 'An Architectural Guide to Los Angeles', the definitive reference work on Los Angeles' built environment. Of these, five are in Silver Lake: the architect's own studio/home, the Murakami House and two duplexes on Silver Ridge Avenue, and the Landa Apartments on the corner of Griffith Park and Landa Street. Other notable works include the Aldemus Apartments in Highland Park and the Muller House in West Hollywood.

    The Lago Vista condominium complex is located at 1701 Clinton Street in Echo Park on a bluff overlooking Echo Park Lake.
  • LACCD Van de Kamp Innovation Center, Roschen Van Cleve + Ehrlich Architects 2010
    Plans to establish a satellite campus for Los Angeles City College on the site of the old Van de Kamp
    bakery in Glassell Park ran into budget problems.The Los Angeles Community College District
    remains committed to the process, however in the meantime a new public charter high school, the Environmental Science and Technology High School (ESAT) has opened at the site. The new education building, built directly behind the bakery was designed by a consortium including Roschen Van Cleve, Ehrlich Architects, ARUP & Quatro Design Group (Construction Administration). Located at 2930 Fletcher Drive.

  • LACCD Van de Kamp Innovation Center, Roschen Van Cleve + Ehrlich Architects 2010
    Plans to establish a satellite campus for Los Angeles City College on the site of the old Van de Kamp
    bakery in Glassell Park ran into budget problems.The Los Angeles Community College District
    remains committed to the process, however in the meantime a new public charter high school, the Environmental Science and Technology High School (ESAT) has opened at the site. The new education building, built directly behind the bakery was designed by a consortium including Roschen Van Cleve, Ehrlich Architects, ARUP & Quatro Design Group (Construction Administration). Located at 2930 Fletcher Drive.

  • La Pintoresca Library, Bennett and Haskell 1930
    La Pintoresca ('the picturesque') Branch Library, built in 1930, was named for the hotel which previously occupied the site. Located in the midst of a park, the library also serves as a community center, providing local residents with an informal meeting place. Located at 1355 North Raymond Avenue Pasadena, CA 91103.


  • La Fonda Restaurant, Morgan, Walls & Clements 1926
    Spanish Colonial Revival style building designed by the architectural firm Morgan, Walls & Clements in 1926. Over the years we went to the restaurant on special occasions, especially birthdays and anniversaries for the mariachi show, one of the best in town. We always had our Spanish-speaking friends make reservations for us in advance, arranging for the best seats in the house. The place was always packed; it came as a complete surprise to discover the restaurant is no more, shuttered now for several years.

    La Fonda was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1983 (No. 268). Located at 2501 Wilshire Boulevard.
  • Kyle House, Milton J. Black, Architect 1936
    Architect Milton J. Black designed the house for R.C. Kyle in a 'Regency Monterey' style; the influence of Black's trademark Streamline Moderne style is evident. Located at 2400 Chiselhurst Drive in Los Feliz.
  • Kun House, Richard Neutra Architect 1936
    The Kun House has special significance to Modernist architecture fans; it was here that photographer Julius Shulman was first introduced to modernist architecture and Richard Neutra, a signature event that launched Shulman's career in 1936. Located at 7960 Fareholm Drive in the Hollywood Hills.
  • Kubly House, Craig Ellwood & Associates 1964








    The Kubly House by architect Craig Ellwood (1922–1992) artfully blends the formalism of Mies van der Rohe with the informal style of California Modernism. The glass and timber house is located at 215 La Vereda Road in Pasadena, California.
  • Kress & Company, Edward F. Sibbert 1935
    New York-based architect Edward Sibbert designed more than fifty Art Deco style S. H. Kress & Company stores between 1929 and 1944. The founder of the company, Samuel H. Kress believed that stores should serve as works of public art that contribute to the cityscape. Kress opened his first 'five and dime' store in Pennsylvania in 1887. The last one closed in 1981.

    Located at 6606 Hollywood Boulevard in Hollywood, California.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved
  • Kravis Center, Rafael Vinoly Architects 2011
    Kravis Center consists of the construction of a five-level, 162,000 square-foot academic and administrative facility and will serve as the western gateway to the Claremont McKenna campus. The overall project includes offices, classrooms, seminar rooms, an underground parking structure, and outdoor courtyards. Scheduled for completion in 2011. Rafael Viñoly Architects PC is an international practice with headquarters in New York and offices in London and Los Angeles. The Kravis Center will be the firm’s third California project, following buildings at the University of California, Los Angeles and the University of California, San Francisco.

  • Krause House, Raphael Soriano 1950-52
    Architect Raphael Soriano designed the prefabricated modular steel frame house between 1950 and 1952. It is one of only approximately 12 of the fifty buildings the architect designed still standing. The geometric forms of the house counterbalance and complement the naturalness of the landscape. The Krause House is located at 8513 La Sierra Avenue in the Friendly Hills section of Whittier, California.

  • Koosis House, Raphael Soriano 1940
    Unfortunately the beauty of this Soriano-designed house has been compromised by the addition of a garage and a rental unit above (seen partially to the left) which were added at a later date. Located at 1941 Glencoe Way in the Hollywood Hills.
  • Kong Chow Benevolent Association, Eugene Kinn Choy, Architect
    Chinatown Family Associations are organized according to family surnames. These social clubs or lodges were first set up in Chinatown to serve the social and personal needs of Chinese workers. The success and survival of the early Chinatown depended a great deal on the family benevolent Associations which served as political and social support systems to newcomers. The members strove to meet the basic needs of the community, and represented a united voice in the fight against discriminatory legislation process.

    Born in Guangdong, China, Eugene Kinn Choy immigrated with his parents to the United States in 1898. They settled in Bakersfield, where the family made a living selling blue jeans to the farm hands working the fields of California's Central Valley. He enrolled in the University of Southern California School of Architecture, following in the path of Gilbert Leong. He was politically active on campus, serving in the Architecture School Student Senate and Alpha Lambda, a Chinese American student group.

    After graduation in 1939, he put his career ambitions on hold due to World War II; he went to work for Hughes Aircraft until the war was over. Resuming his architectural career, he became the first Chinese American in California to join the AIA; second only to New York-based I.M. Pei. He launched his own architectural practice with a small staff; designing a wide range of projects. He collaborated with his younger brother, Allan Kinn Choy, also a practicing architect, on several projects, including the FBI Office Building in Las Vegas,

    Located at 931 N. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90012
  • Kodak Theatre, David Rockwell, Designer, the Rockwell Group, and Theatre Projects Consultants, 2001
    The “Crown Jewel” of the Hollywood & Highland Retail Center, a dining and entertainment complex in the heart of Hollywood. The 3,000-plus seat theatre opened in 2001; it is the first permanent home of the Academy Awards. The Grand Staircase is flanked by columns displaying the names of winners for Best Picture since 1927-1928.

  • Kleihauer Memorial Chapel, Carleton M. Winslow Jr. & Warren Waltz, Architects 1967
    Tucked away from the street behind a chained gate, the Kleihauer Memorial Chapel of the now-defunct Hollywood Christian Church is a small treasure. Designed by the famed ecclesiastical architect Carleton M. Winslow Jr. and Warren Waltz in 1967, the now-forsaken worship center starkly demonstrates the changing fortunes (and challenges) of the inner-city church.

    The Kleihauer Memorial Chapel is located at 1717 N. Gramercy Place in Hollywood.
  • Kinney-Everhardy Residence, 1353 Alvarado Terrace
    Designed by Sumner P. Hunt & Wesley Eager in 1902 for A.W. Kinney, a prominent Angelino businessman. It is one of the half dozen elegant mansions on Alvarado Terrace, promoted by real estate developer Pomeroy Powers who was President of the Los Angeles City Council from 1900 to 1904.

    Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1971 (NO. 88).
  • Kings Road House, Rudolph M. Schindler 1921-22
    The Kings Road House, also known as the Schindler House, is considered one of the architect's most important works. The Schindlers maintained the house as a center for culture, focusing on progressive and creative activities.

    The Schindler House is the home for the MAK Center for Art and Architecture since 1994, making a unique contribution to the artistic and cultural landscape of Los Angeles, offering a year round schedule of lectures, exhibitions, symposia and concerts.

    Located at 835 N. Kings Road in the City of West Hollywood.
  • Kimpson-Nixon House, Raphael Soriano 1939
    Architect Raphael Soriano designed the classic stucco & glass Kimpson-Nixon House in the International Style in 1939; the house is regarded as one of his purest achievements. The horizontal band of windows running the length of the house fills the interior with natural light and adds to the indoor-outdoor experience. The house is a Long Beach Historic Landmark, located at 380 Orlena Avenue in the Belmont Heights neighborhood. It recently (2012) sold for $699,000; a real bargain for a great masterpiece.
  • Kilner House, Carlton M. Winslow, Architect 1922
    Famed architect Carlton M. Winslow designed the Italianate Revival style home for William H.B. Kilmer and his family in 1922. Located at 2031 North Oxford Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Kidspace Museum, Michael Maltzan Architecture 2003
    Kidspace Museum is located near the Rose Bowl in Brookside Park promoting education through interactive experiences in science, art, and the humanities.. The site incorporates the c.1938 historic Fannie Morrison Horticultural Center. The architect introduced new buildings that redefine the existing courtyard and weave through the rehabilitated historic buildings. A tilted tower element in the houses a climbing structure inspiring a sense of discovery and adventure. Located at 480 N Arroyo Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91103.
  • Kett House- A. Quincy Jones & Frederick E. Emmons, Architects 1950




    During the years 1950-1969, the prolific partnership of A. Quincy Jones and Frederick Emmons was responsible for the design of approximately 5,000 modern homes. In 1969, the firm was recognized as the 'AIA Firm of the Year', the same year that Emmons retired. The firm was noted for their pioneering work in bringing stylish architecture to a level of affordability that could be enjoyed by middle-income families. During his long career, Jones also partnered with Paul R. Williams on several project in Palm Springs including the Palm Springs Tennis Club, participated in the Case Study House program and was professor and Dean at the University of Southern California School of Architecture from 1951-1967.

    The Kett House is located at 1709 Golf Club Drive in the Chevy Chase Canyon area of Glendale, CA. The firm also designed two other Glendale homes, the Fuller House at 3068 Chevy Chase Drive and the Leavitt House at 1919 Bayberry Drive.
  • Kerkhoff House, Hunt & Eager Architects, 1906
    Kerkhoff House, located at 734 West Adams Boulevard is a grand mansion in the English Tudor Style. Built by architects Hunt & Eager, it is situated on the campus of the University of Southern California and is now part of the school. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1994 (No. 606).
  • Kentucky Fried Chicken, Grinstein/Daniels Architects, 1990
    Cutting through city streets to get around the congestion of the Santa Monica Freeway, I have often passed this stylistic 'bucket of chicken' on Western Avenue. In a neighborhood that otherwise looks a bit bleak, the fast food restaurant brings a bit of cheer (and maybe even a little hope) to the streetscape.

    Designed by architect Jeffrey Daniels in 1990, one can see the influence of Frank Gehry in this symbolic work. The architect, who earned his Masters Degree in Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, worked for the Gehry firm from 1978 to 1980.

    Kentucky Fried Chicken is located at 340 N. Western Avenue (near Third Street).
  • Kentucky Fried Chicken, Grinstein/Daniels Architects, 1990
    View from Western Avenue. The influence of Frank Gehry can be appreciated in this photo. In a whimsical way, I can't help but think of Disney Hall).
  • KCET Studios, 4401 West Sunset Boulevard
    Prior to its purchase in 1970 by KCET's parent company, Community Televison of Southern California, the studio was one of the earliest movie production studios in Los Angeles and was the home of several motion picture firms including Monogram, ColorVision and Allied Artists. The Keystone Kops, Charlie Chaplin and Fatty Arbuckle all made movies here. A few of the notable films produced here include 'Friendly Persuasion', 'Hurricane' and 'Invasion of the Body Snatchers'. The property has been the home of KCET, a public broadcast station since 1971.

    The KCET Studios are located at 4401 West Sunset Boulevard in the Los Feliz Village area. Due to its historic significance, the property was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1978 (No. 198).
    Website:www.KCET.org
  • Julia Faye House, H.P. Siberell, Builder 1922
    Originally built for Mable F.Farrell by contractor H.P. Siberell in 1922, the Georgian Colonial estate was the home of silent screen star Julia Faye., Cecil B. DeMille's mistress; some say DeMille owned the home and provided it for her to live in. Faye appeared in more DeMille movies than any other actress. including many of his silents and in every one of his movies beginning with 'Union Pacific' in 1939. DeMille kept her employed in bit parts long after her career (and their relationship) was over, including his most famous film, The Ten Commandments (1956).

    The home was last sold in 2008 for $2,625,000 to Rowan Mehail Trollope Senior Vice President and General Manager of Symantec.Cloud at Symantec Corporation. The house is located at 2338 Observatory Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.











  • Judson Studios, Train & Williams Architects 1900-1909
    The Judson Studios is one of the oldest surviving stained glass studios in America, founded in 1897. The original building was designed in 1900 by William Lees Judson, founder of the Los Angeles College of Fine Arts in an Islamic Revival style. After the roof was destroyed by a fire in 1910, Architects Train & Williams redesigned the studio in 1909. Designated a Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument in 1969 (NO. 62). Located at 200 S. Avenue 66 in the Highland Park Historic Preservation Overlay Zone of Los Angeles.
  • Joseph Dupuy House, Joseph Dupuy, Designer c. 1902
    The residence of musician Joseph Dupuy, who designed the home with a Polynesian flair, the home is known locally as the 'South Seas House.' The house fell into disrepair in recent years; community-minded residents convinced local officials to secure funding to restore the house and use it as a community center. Nearly $1 million went into extensive repairs.

    The house, which is owned and operated by the Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks, is located at 2301 W. 24th Street in Exposition Park.
  • Johnstone House, William Kesling, 1935

    One of Kesling's earliest commissions and one of his best. The home was built right after the success of his 'Model Home' in Silver Lake, which established the young architect-builder as a force in the Modernist Movement. It must have appeared on the outer edge of the avante-garde in the affluent Los Feliz of the time, when elegant homes of Spanish, Mediterranean and English Tudor design were most preferred. Resistance to this new 'machine' architecture was high; it took the speculators almost two years to sell the house after its completion.

    The Johnstone House is located in Los Feliz on Lowry Road just north of Los Feliz Boulevard on the west side of the street.

    For more information on William Kesling, be sure and read the fascinating book, 'Kesling Modern Structures: Popularizing Modern Design in Southern California: 1934-1962' by Patrick Pascal (with Photographs by Julius Shulman and David Sadofski, Balcony Press, 2002). Be sure and read the interesting articles on Kesling homes in Silver Lake described on our webpage 'The Architecture of Silver Lake' (go back to the MENU on the left).
  • Johnnie Cochran Residence c.1971
    The stylish residence of celebrity lawyer Johnnie Cochran, best known for his role in the defense and acquittal of O. J. Simpson for the alleged murder of his former wife Nicole Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman. Cochran also represented Michael Jackson, rapper Tupac Shakur, actor Todd Bridges, football player Jim Brown, rapper Snoop Dogg, former heavyweight Champion Riddick Bowe, He also represented athlete Marion Jones when she faced charges of doping during her high school track career. Cochran was known for his skill in the courtroom and his prominence as an early advocate for victims of police brutality. Located at 2373 N. Hobart Blvd. in the Los Feliz Oaks district of Los Angeles.
  • John T. Lyle Guest House, John Tidwell Lyle, Architect c.1985
    Landscape Architect John T. Lyle designed the guest house and gardens for the Harwell Hamilton Harris-designed Mulvihill House in Sierra Madre which he shared with his wife, Harriet. The guest house is joined to the main house by a bridge. Located at 580 N. Hermosa Avenue in Sierra Madre.
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  • John Storer House, Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect, 1923
    One of five residences built by Frank Lloyd Wright in Los Angeles and probably the best preserved thanks to producer Joel Silver. Silver purchased the house in the 1980s. Restoration work and improvements by Lloyd Wright and later, Eric Wright, Martin Eli Weil and Linda Marder has kept the house in a remarkable condition. Set against a steep hillside on a tranquil street in West Hollywood, the Storer House is a civic treasure.

    The John Storer House is located at 8161 Hollywood Blvd. in West Hollywood. It was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument by the L.A. Cultural Affairs Department in 1972. (No. 96).
  • John P. Jones Residence, Robert D. Farquhar Architect 1906
    Architect Robert D. Farquhar designed the Anglo-Colonial Revival style residence for Senator John P. Jones in 1906. Jones was the founder of the City of Santa Monica along with landowner Colonel Robert S. Baker in 1875. Located at 130 Adelaide Drive.
  • John Matias Sanchez Adobe c.1845-1850s
    The Sanchez Adobe was originally built in 1845 and is the oldest home in the Montebello area. The land was granted to Dona Casilda Soto de Lobo by Governor Manuel Micheltorena on October 8, 1844. At the time of the grant, Micheltorena was brigadier general of the Mexican Army and Commandant-General of the Department of California.

    The house was deeded to the City of Montebello by Mrs. Josephine Scott Crocker on June 24, 2013. Although significantly enlarged and modified over time, the adobe is a fine example of the architecture of California in the mid-19th Century.

    The facility is currently operated as a museum by the City of Montebello. Located at 946 North Adobe Avenue..
  • John Marshall High School, George M. Lindsey, Architect, 1930-1931
    Slated for demoliton after the 1971 Earthquake (due to the fact that the building was largely unreinforced brick construction), the community waged a battle to preserve it. Tutor-Saliba/Potashnik JV Construction won a contract with the Los Angeles Board of Education to reinforce the construction at great expense to preserve the magnificent architecture.

    The school is a fine example of the Collegiate Gothic Style. Due to its proximity to Hollywood and its classical style, it has been featured in numerous movies including 'Grease', 'Rebel Without a Cause' and 'Buffy the Vampire Slayer' amongst others. Marshall High School alumni include Julie Newman and Leonardo DiCaprio, who graduated with the help of a tutor. Hollywood madam Heidi Fleiss was a Marshall dropout (her dad still runs a medical practice in Los Feliz). Popular Los Angeles City Council Member Tom LaBonge and Modernist Architect Michael Rotundi are also graduates.
  • John DeKeyser Residence, R.M. Schindler, Architect 1935
    Accessible only by private walkway 65 steps above HIghland Avenue (or 75 steps down from Frank Lloyd Wright's Freeman House) (see article on this webpage), Schindler built this house for a music historian who valued his privacy. The house consists of a 2 bedroom main house and a one bedroom apartment below, each with private patio, deck or balcony.

    The DeKeyser Residence is located in Hollywood at 1911 N. Highland Avenue. It is currently on the market for $895,000 (April 2006).
  • John C. Harrison House c.1891
    Queen Anne Victorian style mansion originally built for John Cleves Short Harrison, a retired businessman from Indiana. Located at 1160 West Avenue 27th in the North University Park National Register Historic District. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 296) in 1985.
  • John C. Fremont Branch Library, Merl L. Barker Architect 1927
    Architect Merl L Barker designed the Mediterranean Revival style John C. Fremont Branch Library in 1927. In 1987, the library was added to the National Register of Historic Places.


    Located at 6121 Melrose Avenue in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • John Brockman Clock Tower Estate
    Historic 'Clock Tower' Estate built by John Brockman, a wealthy civil war hero and friend of Abraham Lincoln in 1910. Brockman constructed the clock tower in 1920. The clock was removed from a property which Brockman donated to the Orthopaedic Hospital in downtown Los Angeles, for which Brockman was a primary benefactor. The original hands of the clock are displayed in the hospital to this day. Brockman had the house built in the style of the Bwick Reim Villa located in Hessen, Germany, his birthplace. The influence of the Prairie and Craftsman Styles are evident everywhere: large porches and public rooms, massive fireplaces, and rich wood paneling.

    I had the pleasure of visiting this remarkable property in July 2006, when it came up for sale for the first time in twenty-three years. The realtor who has the listing, Maureen Bush, had done quite a bit of research on the history of the estate. 'In the 1930s, the house was purchased by a prominent attorney, W. Joseph Ford, whose many famous trials include the notorious 1910 McNamara case where union members, The McNamara Brothers, bombed the Los Angeles Times Building (killing 22). The brothers also attempted to bomb the home of Otis, erstwhile Times owner. The defending attorney in the case was Clarence Darrow, who hoped to save the defendents from the death penalty.

    Ford was also the attorney for the defense in a rape case involving Alexander Pantages. A young lady auditioning for a part, ran from Mr. Pantages' office shouting 'Beast!' while being observed ripping her clothes off. The landmark case changed the way rape cases are tried. It was the first time that previous history details were not allowed to be divulged. During the trial, Pantages' wife, Lois, killed a Japanese American gardener. Ford later defended Lois. In 1931, Ford was the prosecuting attorney in the infamous 'Debonair Dave' Case. David H. Clark, a former District Attorney, who had turned to a life of crime, was charged with killing two people. Ford tried each murder seperately to insure convictions, a unique strategy at the time.'


    Once surrounded by a vast 100 acre park, the estate now stands on almost an acre of land and maintains most of its original architectural integrity. The home boasts four fireplaces, six bedrooms and six baths, a billiards room, huge family room, the original carriage entry and a moat-like koi pond. It is currently listed for sale for $4.2 Million.

    The John Brockman Clock Tower Estate is located at 1605 Arbor Drive in Glendale.


  • John Bakewell Phillips House, Charles & Henry Greene 1906
    Architects Charles and Henry Greene designed the Phillips House in a Swiss Craftsman Chalet style in 1906. The house is a Designated Pasadena Historic Landmark. Located at 459 Bellefontaine Street in the historic Lower Arroyo Seco neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • Jensen's Recreation Center (Electric Sign) E.E.B. Meinardus, Architect 1924








    The Jensen Recreation Center was one of several buildings built by German immigrant Christian Jensenone in the 1920s.. Jensen made a fortune making bricks for the rapidly growing city. The center orginially had shops, a bowling alley, and a pool hall at street level, and apartments on the top two levels.

    Today, the building looks much like it did in the 1920’s. The bowling alley is long gone, however the Egyptian-motif ceiling still exists.

    The incandescent sign (with 1,300 red, green and white light bulbs) that sits atop the building has illuminated Los Angeles' eastside for more than 50 years. The sign depicting a bowler throwing a strike was restored to its original appearance through a cultural affairs grant. For many residents, the relighting of the sign was a momentous event that signaled the revitalization of the community and gave the neighborhood an identity.**

    The building was declared Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument No. 652 in 1998. Located at 1706 W. Sunset Boulevard in Echo Park.

    **Details excerpted from a description of the building written by Becky Koppenhaver for the Echo Park Historical Society, October, 28,2005.



  • Jean Mannheim House & Studio, Jean Manheim 1909
    Jean Mannheim (1863-1945) was one of the most influential artists of the California Plein Air art movement, among his favorite subjects were the scenic settings of the Arroyo Seco where he had built his studio and home in 1909. Although Mannheim is frequently given credit for the design of his home, he more than likely had help from an architect-friend. The Mannheim House is a Pasadena Historic Landmark located at 500 S. Arroyo Boulevard.
  • Japanese American National Museum, Edgar Cline, Architect 1925, KNSU JV Architects (Remodel) 1992
    Located in the Little Tokyo area of Los Angeles, the Japanese American National Museum is devoted to the history and culture of Japanese Americans. The museum contains over 100,000 feet of 16 mm and 8 mm home movies of Japanese Americans from the 1920s to the 1950s, as well as artifacts, textiles, art, photographs, and oral histories dating back to the first Issei generation.

    Located at 369 East 1st Street in Little Tokyo.
  • Janss-Letts House, J.J. Frauenfelder, Architect 1921
    Mediterranean Revival style house originally designed by J. J. Frauenfelder in 1921 for Dr. Edward Janss. Gladys (Letts) Janss was listed in Who's Who in the Women of California in 1922. Author Sarah Hathaway Bixby Smith was the owner of the house in the thirties. A graduate of Wellesley College, she was the author of many published works including 'Milestones in Los Angeles' (1933); 'Adobe Days, Being the Truthful Narrative of the Events in the Life of a California Girl on a Sheep Ranch in El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora de Los Angeles While it Was Yet a Small and Humble Town' and two volumes of poetry, 'My Sagebrush Garden' and 'Pasear'.

    The Janss House is located at 4800 West Los Feliz Boulevard in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Janss-Chandler House, Martyn Haenkle & W.J. Dodd, Architects 1913








    Originally designed for the Jans Family, developers of Westwood and the Holmby Hills. The house was purchased by Norman and Dorothy Chandler, publishers of the Los Angeles Times and re-named 'Los Tiempos' (Spanish for 'The Times'). The home is distinguished by columns, scrolled capitals, and roof balustrade characteristic of the Beaux Arts Classical Revival style. Presidents Kennedy, Nixon and Johnson stayed here during the Chandler era. The house was restoed by interior designer Timothy Corrigan in the 1990s.

    Located at 455 S. Lorrain Blvd. in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Janes House, Dennis & Farwell 1902
    You have to look to find it, in the back of a commercial court on busy Hollywood Boulevard. The house itself is surrounded by what appears to be a temporary fence and/or thick vegetation. I was able to take this photo from the second story balcony of the courtyard. It is the last remaining of the Victorian homes that lined the boulevard (which was called Prospect Avenue) at the time it was built in 1903. The house was purchased by the Janes family in 1903. For many years, the Janes sisters operated a family-run school, 'The Misses Janes Kindergarten' at the home. Children from the Hollywood film community including Charlie Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks, Cecil B. DeMille, Noah Beery, Jesse Lasky, and the Chandler Family (who own the Los Angeles Times) attended the school.

    The late Queen Anne Victorian style house is a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument, dedicated in 1980. Located at 6541 Hollywood Boulevard.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved

  • Jamie Kennedy Residence, Philippe Naouri (Remodel) 2006
    Comedian Jamie Kennedy Kennedy purchased the house through a money manager, Ira Brodsky, and through his Most Wanted Trust. Originally built in 1958, Kennedy’s house had been redesigned by its previous owner, Philippe Naouri, who himself had purchased it in early 2006 for $1,960,000.

    Features in Kennedy’s new house include three bedrooms, two and a half baths, and a pool, all on a gated 0.18-acre parcel. Other features include a sliding glass partition that separates the living area from the family or media room, a hot tub, fire pits, a koi tank, and private gardens, according to listing information. Kennedy. Located at 2508 N. Vermont Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • James A. Culbertson House, Charles & Henry Greene c.1902
    Unfortunately the house has been greatly altered since designed by the Greenes in 1902. The house was extensively remodeled in 1953 by Smith & Williams. The original wall surrounding the property, as well as a pergola are remnants of the Greene's work. Located at 235 North Grand Avenue in the Upper Arroyo Seco neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • Jacobson House, Edward Fickett 1966
    The architect built two homes for the Jacobson family, the first, in Silver Lake at 2313 Moreno Drive in 1951. Later the family commissioned a second home in Los Feliz, located at 4520 Dundee Drive. I photographed the Silver Lake house back in 2007 for the Silver Lake Reservoirs Conservancy House Tour, 'Silver Lake Modernism Then & Now'.

    I had always wanted to see the Los Feliz house but didn't have the opportunity until it went on the market today., The three bedroom, three bath house in 2926 sq.ft. is described in the listing ' First contemporary structure to receive Landmark Status by the City of Los Angeles HCM #674). An intact original post-and-beam masterpiece, the residence embodies the distinguishing characteristics of Fickett's work; custom designed light fixtures, clerestory windows, room partitions, walnut paneling, built-in amenities such as bar and music storage, aggregate stone paving, large wrap-around decks and interior atrium positioned to allow soft light into areas of the home. Commanding landmark views, swimmers pool, and separate guest/office quarters. Three bedrms, 2 ½ baths and study. Private entertainment pavilion. Newer period Kitchen, Baths, efficient solar panels and improved skylight serve today's lifestyle with deserving upgrades. Nurtured native California landscape. Sited on perhaps the finest architectural street in prime Los Feliz on an approximately 13,000+ sq ft lot. A Midsummer Night's Dream'.

    Located at 4520 Dundee Drive in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Jacobsen House, John Lautner 1947
    One of four houses featured on the John Lautner 100th Birthday Architecture Tour, July 23, 2011. For the Jacobson House, the architect employed a unique roof system, utilizing a hexagonal steel horizontal frame supported on three tapered steel trusses to resist seismic structural loads. The house is located at 3540 Multiview Drive in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles.
  • Jacobs House, Lee Hershberger, Architect 1992
    A rarity of sorts, the late-arriving Craftsman Revival replaced an indistinguished 1950s house. A huge Moreton Bay fig frames the house beautifully. Located at 335 West Bellevue Drive in the Lower Arroyo Seco neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • Jack C. Schapiro House, J.R. Davidson 1950
    Architect J.R. Davidson designed the contemporary home for Jack C. Shapiro in 1950; it was the second house he designed on Waverly Drive in Los Feliz a few doors apart. Located at 3214 Waverly Drive.

  • J.B. Merrill House, H.M. Patterson, Architect c.1909
    The Shingle style Craftsman bungalow was one of the first three built in the Mt. Washington neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. It was built for J. B. Merrill, an accomplished musician who had the house outfitted with a large pipe organ. Organ concerts and music recitals were a common occurrence at the house during his ownership.

    Located at 815 Elyria Drive in the Mt. Washington neighborhood of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 483) in 1990.
  • J. E. Maxwell Residence, Arthur B. Benton, 1907
    Architect Arthur B. Benton designed a house for J. E. Maxwell in an eclectic mix of styles; adding an Italianate portico on what is basically a Craftsman house. Located at 211 S. Avenue 52 in the historic Highland Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultrual Monument in 1991 (no. 539).
  • Ioannes House, Louis B. Easton 1911
    The Mission Revival style house was designed by Architect Louis B. Easton in 1911. The architect built about 25 houses in Pasadena between 1904 and 1914, mostly of the California bungalow variety; the Ioannes House is an exception. Eaton was an architect of the middle class, working directly with clients and a small crew working together from 'start to finish building one house at a time'.

    The Ioannes House is located at 885 S. Madison Avenue in the Oak Knoll neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • Indiana Avenue Houses-Arnoldi Triplex, Frank O. Gehry & Associates 1981
    The post modern style houses came about as a result of a collaboration with Frank Gehry and two local artists, Laddie Dill and Chuck Arnoldi. The trio purchased a vacant lot for $15,000 with the intention of building the first of a series of studio spaces for local artists, with each separate structure clad in common materials (green asphalt shingles, unstained plywood and blue-painted stucco). The interiors were intentionally left half-finished; partially as a desire to save money on construction costs, and at the same time, allow the prospective tenant to personalize the space.

    Located at 326 Indiana Avenue in Venice Beach, California.
  • Hunter House, Arthur H. Stibolt, Architect 1929
    Architect Arthur Stibolt designed the 16-room mansion for contractor Donald L. Hunter in 1929. The English Tudor style home is located at 3648 Shannon Road in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Hulsman House, A. Godfrey Bailey, Architect 1933
    Architect A. Godfrey Bailey designed the English Tudor Revival style house for B.H. Hulsman in 1933. The architect also designed a similarly designed house for actor Adolphe Menjou on Nottingham Avenue the following year, as well as the Eagle Rock Woman's Christian Temperance Union Home for Women in 1927, a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 562). Located at 5079 Los Feliz Boulevard.

  • Hugo Reid Adobe c.1839
    The adobe is the oldest and most important historical structure in what is today the city of Arcadia, California. Long believed to be the original home of Hugo Reid, recent research has revealed that the structure is not the Reid adobe, which likely was demolished in 1854.

    Scottish-born adventurer Hugo Reid was given the Rancho Santa Anita as a land grant by Mexican Governor Pio Pico in 1845, however he mostly lived in San Gabriel near the Mission. After running into financial difficulties, he sold his holdings to a neighboring rancher, Henry Dalton. Joseph Rowe acquired the property in 1854, demolishing the adobe and built another on the site. Elias Jackson “Lucky” Baldwin purchased the rancho in 1875. The house is designated a California Historic Landmark (No. 368).

    The adobe is located on the grounds of the Los Angeles County Arboretum in Arcadia, California.
  • Hubbard Library Expansion & Renovation, House & Robertson Architects, William McDonough + Partners







    The project includes a new 48,250-sq.-ft. addition to the existing 34,705-sq.-ft. McAlister Library, with two stories below grade and three above. The project was one of the first to be permitted by the City of Pasadena under their green building municipal code requirements.
    This new library is dedicated in honor of David Allan Hubbard, past president of Fuller Theological Seminay from 1963-1993. The library is located on the campus of Fuller Seminary, 135 N. Oakland Avenue.
  • Howard S. McKay Residence, Russell E. Collins, Architect 1937
    Colonial Revival style residence designed for Howard S. McKay c.1937 by Russell Everett Collins AIA (1893-1974). The architect is best known for the design of the historic Ralphs Grocery Store in Westwood Village, declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1988 and photographed by Ansel Adams in 1940. The architect was born in Oregon and died in Los Angeles at the age of 81. Located at 3546 Amesbury Road in the Los Feliz Neighborhood of Los Angeles. The house is currently (February 2013) on the market and listed for sale for $1,295,000.

  • House of the Seven Dwarfs- Ben Sherwood, Builder 1931
    Located near the original Disney Studios, these charming cottages built in 1931 are known by locals as 'The House of the Seven Dwarfs'. Consisting of eight half-timbered, steep-roofed small cottages built around a courtyard and anchored at the end by a Norman tower, the cottages exemplify the Storybook Architecture Style which flourished in Los Angeles in the 20's and 30's.

    The House of the Seven Dwarfs is located at 2900-2912 1/2 Griffith Park Blvd. in Los Feliz.
  • Hotel Shangri-la, William E. Foster 1939-40
    Located along Santa Monica's fashionable Ocean Avenue, the Streamline Moderne style Hotel Shangri-La is was originally designed as an apartment building. Real estate tycoon Ahmad Adaya purchased the hotel in the 1983. Following a $30M renovation, the hotel reopened in October 2008. The hotel was featured as a backdrop in Randy Newman's 'I Love LA' music video (1984); 'White Men Can't Jump', and television episodes of Melrose Place and The Bachelor. Located at 1301 Ocean Avenue.

  • Horace Bashor Residence, Wilkinson & Crosby, Architects 1937; Barton Phelps, Remodel 1985
    Architects Wilkinson & Crosby designed the Colonial Revival Style residence for D. Horace A. Bashor in 1937. Dr. Bashor was active in the Los Feliz Improvement Association, and served as Director in 1941.

    The house was purchased by the owners of the Los Feliz Inn (later Pierre's Los Feliz Inn) Kathleen and C.E. Erickson in the 1960's. In the eighties, the house was purchased by author/historian/journalist Diane Kanner. Located at 2355 HIllhurst Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Hood-Cox House c.1886
    Victorian style house located at 494 Ellis Street in Pasadena, California. A brass plaque near the front of the house reads, 'The Hood-Cox House, built March 1886. This was the first house built on Colorado Court (cul-de-sac west of Orange Grove Boulevard before bridge was built) built for Mrs. J.H. Hood by the Swift Brothers for $2800. It was purchased and moved to this site in 1901 by the Honorable John S. Cox, Pasadena's Mayor from 1895 to 1896.' The house is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Honmichi Los Angeles Shutchosho Temple, Obayashi Architects 1984
    The Japanese style house of worship is the Los Angeles area temple for the Honmichi, a religious group headquartered in Osaka, Japan. Founded by Ōnishi Aijirō (1881-1958), originally a teacher in Tenrikyō. In 1913 Aijirō came to the conviction that he himself embodied the 'principle of the living kanrodai' ('heavenly pillar,' namely, that he himself was the intermediary of the heavenly will.

    In 1938, Honmichi followers were arrested nationwide throughout Japan, on the charge of violating the Peace Preservation Law and the crime of lèse majesté, while group meetings were prohibited and the organization ordered to disband (the 'Second Honmichi Incident'). Following Japan's defeat in World War II, however, all members were released, and pardoned in 1946. In the same year, full-scale reconstruction of the group began, with the office that had already been moved to the city of Takaishi now serving as the group's headquarters. Honmichi was registered as a religious corporation under the postwar Religious Corporations Ordinance (Shūkyō Hōjinrei), and then under the Religious Corporations Law (Shūkyō Hōjinhō) in 1952.

    Ōnishi Aijirō died in 1958, and at present has been succeeded by his grandson Ōnishi Yasuhiko (1960-), who is viewed as Aijirō's reincarnation and thus the new kanrodai. In 1979, the headquarters opened its doors to non-believers for the first time, and for three years beginning in 1980 sponsored so-called 'Honmichi Introduction' meetings for outsiders. At present, members (called michibito or 'people of the way') practice activities called nioigake and hinokishin as ways of acquiring and implementing the group's teaching. Whereas nioigake denotes primarily proselytizing work on an individual level, hinokishin refers to the construction, maintenance and management of physical facilities through the volunteer labor service supplied by members. It is believed that these activities produce an awareness of the need for unity among all believers, a condition called kokoro no fushin ('mind building').

    The temple is located at 4431 Wilshire Boulevard in the Mid-Wilshire district of Los Angeles.
  • Hong Residence, Roger Hong, Architect 1968
    Buff & Hensman associate Architect Roger designed the classic post-and-beam house for his mother in 1968. The architect drew on Asian traditions and his training at the University of Southern California School of Architecture. Located at 5146 West Los Franciscos in the Los Feliz Estates neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Hong Kong Café c.1930s
    Located at 425 Gin Ling Way in the New Chinatown District of Los Angeles, the Hong Kong Café was part of the Los Angeles punk rock scene that emerged during the late 1970s. Formerly a Chinese restaurant, well known rock groups including the Plugz and UXA played at the club's opening night on June 7, 1979; numerous bands, including X, Catholic Discipline, The Bags, and The Alley Cats, performed there until its closing in January 1981. Concert footage filmed at the venue appears in the Penelope Spheeris documentary film 'The Decline of Western Civilization.'
    Currently the space is occupied by Realm, a housewares and gifts retailer.
  • Hong House, Myron Hunt 1917
    Anglo-Colonial Revival style designed by prolific architect Myron Hunt c.1917. Located at 396 E. Mendocino Street (alternate address: 2558 Santa Anita Avenue) in the foothill community of Altadena, California.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • Homer Laughlin Building John B. Parkinson 1896; Lyon Building, Harrison Albright 1905
    The Homer Laughlin Building was originally designed by architect John Parkinson for Homer Laughlin, a retired entrepreneur from Ohio and founder of the Homer Laughlin China Company. The building was the first steel-reinforced, fireproof structure built in the city of Los Angeles. In 1905 the building was enlarged with the addition of an annex, called the Lyon Building (or Laughlin Annex). The new structure, designed by architect Harrison Albright was the first reinforced concrete building in the city was expanded through to Hill Street, called either the Laughlin Annex or the Lyon Building. The original tenant was the Ville de Paris Department Store, which was replaced by the Grand Central Market in 1917. The site was chosen due to its proximity to the Angels Flight Railway, providing easy access for wealthy patrons living on Bunker Hill.
    In the 1990s the building, along with the next-door Million Dollar Theater underwent a major renovation by architect Brenda Levin, adding residential units to the upper floors..

    Located at 317 South Broadway in Downtown Los Angeles.
  • Homeland- William F. Markham, 1926
    Growing up in Glendale, this very private Italianate villa has long held my fascination. Hidden behind a tall row of cypresses, a partial view only heightens curiosity. The mansion was built in 1926 by 'Captain' William F. Markham, the developer and inventor of the Markham Air Rifle at Plymouth, Michigan in 1886. In 1916, Markham sold his interests in the rifle company and moved to California. I can only guess that the success of the rifle enabled the builder to afford such a fine home in a more hospitable environment!

    The Homeland Mansion is located at 1405 East Mountain Street in Glendale, CA. In 1977, it was listed in the Glendale Register of Historic Places (No. 25).
  • Home of Peace Cemetery Chapel 1934
    It's a bit surprising to find a pair of minarets and other details of Islamic architecture (pointed arches, for example) in a Jewish cemetery, however such is the case in the Byzantine style mausoleum of the Hope of Peace Cemetery located at 4334 Whittier Boulevard in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles. The cemetery is the final resting place of the rich and famous, including Burt Baskin, business magnate and co-founder of Baskin-Robbins; David Berman (1903–1957), Jewish mobster who ran the Las Vegas Flamingo Hotel and one-time partner of Bugsy Siegel; Carl Laemmle, film executive, founder of Universal Pictures and creator of the 'Star' system; Louis B. Mayer, founder of the MGM film studios; and the Warner Brothers, Harry, Jack and Sam, co-founders of Warner Brothers film studios.
  • Holy Transfiguration Russian Orthodox Church, Eugene Orloff, Designer 1943
    Holy Transfiguration Russian Orthodox Church is a Parish of the Russian Orthodox Church Outside of Russia. Modeled after the 17th century 22-dome Transfiguration Church at Kizhi Pogost, an island located on Lake Onega in the Republic of Karelia, Russia. The pogost is the area inside a fence which includes two large wooden churches (the 22-dome Transfiguration Church and the 9-dome Intercession Church) and a bell-tower. (The pogost is included in the UNESCO list of World Heritage sites).

    On March 17, 1930, a meeting was held at the house of Mr. S.L. Volchencko to consider the possibility of building a second Russian Orthodox church in the city (the first being the Holy Virgin Mary Russian Orthodox Cathedral n Silver Lake, A.A. Tolubeyev, Architect, 1928). They collected $50.00 which was sent to Harbin, Manchuria, to Rev. Nicholas Kicklovich, who arrived on the Holiday of Trinity and held first liturgy on May 13, 1930. The first meeting of all the parish was held in June 14 of the same year, at the temporary church on State Street. During the yearly meeting of the parish, in January 1931 Mr. V. A. Lisizin was elected as a church-warden. While he was in the office, the church was transferred to Elsinore Street, where membership continued to grow. In June 1937 the corporation had a fund of $638.00. In the same month they found a double lot which they bought for $3000.00. (Terms were: $500.00 down and $25.00 monthly installments). At the same time they found an abandoned church which the committee purchased for $200.00. It had to be repaired though, and again the parish was asked for donations. The building was moved on the lot which was previously bought at 5433 Fountain Avenue, A brief consecration and sermon took place on October 17, 1937. The temple was enlarged and new iconostasis were built. The church warden, Mr. V. S. Nicholaeff, a skilled carpenter, devoted his free time to the design and building of the altar.. On February 21, 1944, by resolution of His Eminence Most Rev. Metropolitan Theophilus of all America and Canada, a new rector was appointed to the Church of Holy Transfiguration, Rev. Jacob Pshenichnuk.

    On May 7, 1944, at the yearly meeting of the members of the Church, the Normal Statute of the Metropolitan District of Russian Orthodox Greek-Catholic Church was accepted and last mortgage was paid off. ($1272.65.) Located at 5432 Fernwood Avenue in the East Hollywood (Thai Town) neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Holy Family Catholic Church, Albert C. Martin, Architect 1922
    Interior View of the Sanctuary.
  • Holy Family Catholic Church, Albert C. Martin, Architect 1922
    Albert C. Martin (1879-1960) was one of the most prolific and highly respected architects in Los Angeles during a long career spanning more than a half century. Among the diverse landmarks he designed are the Ventura County Courthouse (1911), the St. Vincent de Paul Roman Catholic Church (1923), Los Angeles City Hall (1928, with architects John C. Austin and John Parkinson), and the Streamline Moderne May Company-Wilshire Department Store (1946).

    The Holy Family Catholic Church was completed in 1922 in an Italian Renaissance Revival style. The church celebrated its centennial year in 2007.

    Holy Family Catholic Church is located 220 E. Elk Avenue in Glendale, CA.
  • Hollywood Seventh Day Adventist Church, Robert Burman, Architect 1961
    Located at 1711 North Van Ness Avenue in Hollywood, California.
  • Hollywood Pantages Building Lobby, Anthony Heinsbergen, Interior Design 1929
    The art deco Pantages Theater and its adjoining office building were designed for theater circuit magnate Alexander Pantages in 1929. The playhouse was the sixty-seventh in his long chain of vaudeville and movie houses. Architect Benjamin Marcus Priteca designed the facade and Anthony Heinsbergen the interior..
  • Hollywood Palladium, Gordon Kaufmann 1940
    Architect Gordon Kaufmann designed the Streamline Moderne style Hollywood Palladium in 1940 with funding from Los Angeles Times publisher Norman Chandler. The dance hall was designed by Gordon Kaufmann who also designed the Greystone Mansion, Los Angeles Times Building, Santa Anita Racetrack in Arcadia.and the Hoover Dam among other noteworthy accomplishments. On opening night, October 31, 1943, the ballroom featured Tommy Dorsey and his Orchestra and Frank Sinatra. It had six bars serving liquor and two more serving soft drinks with a $1 cover charge and a $3 charge for dinner. Hurrah for Hollywood!

    The Hollywood Palladium is located at 6215 Sunset Boulevard in Hollywood, California.
  • Hollywood Masonic Temple, John C. Austin, Field & Frey Architects 1921
    Charles E. Toberman, Lodge Master for the Hollywood Masons, was one of the most important figures behind the early development of Hollywood, and the driving force behind the construction of the Hollywood Bowl, Grauman's Chinese Theatre, the Roosevelt Hotel and the Max Factor Building. When the new temple opened in 1921, it was one of the most important buildiongs in Hollywood. The architect, John C. Austin also designed the Shrine Auditorium, Griffith Observatory and Los Angeles City Hall. In 2002, an article in the Los Angeles Times described the building as, 'An impassive presence that seems to transcend the ebb and flow of Tinseltown glamour—a somber Neoclassical temple that stands in stark contrast to the evolving parade of movers, shakers, panhandlers and paparazzi that have passed before it.' Located at 6840 Hollywood Boulevard.


  • Hollywood High School, Marsh, Smith & Powell Architects 1935
    Monumental Streamline Moderne style designed by the firm Marsh, Smith & Powell c.1934-35. Rounded corners, leaded glass windows, and textile-block brick articulating the windows are among the elements of the late Art Deco styling. Famous alumni of the school include Judy Garland, Meredith Baxter, Keith and Robert Carradine; newspaper publisher Norman Chandler,; Lon Chaney, Jr., diplomat and former U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher; Nanette Fabray, Laurence Fishburne, Director John Huston, Alan Ladd, Ricky Nelson, Sarah Jessica Parker, Jason Robards, John Ritter, and Carol Burnett.

    Located at 1521 North Highland Avenue.
  • Hollywood Duplex, Koning Eisenberg Architecture 1990
    Although appearing from the street as two different structures, the duplex is joined by facing terraces forming an central courtyard. Located at 6947 and 6949 Camrose Drive in the Hollywood Hills.
  • Hollywood American Legion Post 43, Weston & Weston 1929
    The building is reminiscent of the Los Angeles Central Library, designed by Bertram Goodhue & Carlton Winslow Architects three years earlier in 1926 The building, which was Goodhue's last major work, draws on influences from ancient Egyptian architecture, principally the mosaic pyramid central tower. The tile ornamentation looks almost as fresh as when it was seen more than eighty years ago. Dedicated as a Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument (No. 462) in 1989. Located at 2035 Highland Avenue n Hollywood, California.
  • Hollywood & Highland, Ehrenkrantz, Ekstut & Kuhn, Architects 2001
    The retail and entertainment complex on the northwest corner of Hollywood Blvd. and Highland Avenue pays homage to Hollywood's status as the 'world's film capital' with replicas from the D.W. Griffith silent movie, 'Interolance', filmed in 1916. The complex also houses the Hollywood/Metro Subway Station and the Kodak Theater, the permanent home of the annual Academy Awards presentation.
  • Hollyhock House, Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect 1921
    One of Los Angeles' great civic landmarks, Hollyhock House was built for oil heiress Aline Barnsdall, who inherited the estate of her grandfather, William Barnsdall (who had the good fortune of discovering the second oil-producing well in the United States). The heiress had a passion for the arts, serving as co-director of an experimental theater company in Chicago, where she met architect Frank Lloyd Wright. While on a trip to California in 1915, the idea of developing a theatrical community in Los Angeles sparked her imagination with the innovative Wright to be her choice as architect.

    The house takes its name from the hollyhock, a favorite flower of Barnsdall, which is stylized in the decorative elements of the home including the roofline, walls, columns, and furniture. The master plan called for an arts complex to be built on the thirty-six acre site known as Olive Hill consisting of a home for Barnsdall and her daughter, two guest houses, theater, dormitory and studios for actors and artists, shops, a home for the center's director and a movie theater. Only three of the structures were actually realized, the residence and guest houses. Although Wright is credited with the design, the actual construction was supervised by his apprentice, Rudolf Schindler, and Wright's son, Frank Lloyd Wright, Jr., who would establish prominent careers of their own. (Frank Lloyd Wright was preoccupied with work on the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo during most of the construction).

    In 1927, Barnsdall, without ever having lived at Hollyhock, deeded the house and eleven surrounding acres to the City of Los Angeles. It was leased to various organizations including the California Art Club and Dorothy Clune Murray's Olive Hill Foundation in the ensuing decades, enduring alterations to suit the various needs of the tenants. In 1974, the facility underwent an extensive restoration, bringing back much of the original appearance.

    Although Barnsdall's dream of a center for the arts was not realized during her lifetime, she would be proud to see the home in its present state. Today, the Barsdall Arts Park offers a modern civic art gallery, theater, and art studios, and a stunning example of the genius of Frank Lloyd Wright.

    In 1963, the Hollyhock House was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Landmark by the Cultural Affairs Commission (No. 12). The Barnsdall Art Park is located at 4804 Hollywood Boulevard. Hourly tours are available Wednesday through Sunday beginning at 12:30 p.m. and ending at 3:30 p.m.
  • Holliston Avenue United Methodist Church, John C. Austin, Architect 1899
    John C. Austin was a preeminent architects of early Los Angeles, credited with the design of some of the city's most enduring monuments, including the Moorish Shrine Auditorium (1925), the Classical Revival Hollywood Masonic Temple (1921)the Gothic Revival Memorial Branch Library (1930)and the Art Deco Griffith Park Observatory (1933-35).
    He was one of three prominent architects selected to design Los Angeles City Hall (1928); the others were Albert C. Martin and John Parkinson.

    The Hollison Avenue United Methodist Church was originally the First Methodist Church; located at the corner of Colorado Blvd. and Marengo Avenue. It was moved stone by stone to its present location at the corner of Holliston and Colorado. The design is very much Richardsonian Romanesque, a style seen infrequently in the west; a notable example is the Stimson Residence located in West Adams.
  • Hollenbeck Police Station, A.C. Martin Partners, Architects 2009
    Boyle Heights new community police station is a powerful statement of the LAPD's intention to create 'an open, community serving police force'. The architect has carefully considered the community’s distinct tradition of artistic expression.

    The LAPD's forward-thinking philosophy is expressed in three rectangular 2-story 'volumes'. A 54,000 sq ft. main building, 7,000 sq ft vehicle maintenance facility, and 115,000 sq ft parking structure are the station's components.

    A 'staccato rhythm of rectangular windows and insets', highlights the facade, set against an open, public plaza, creating a welcoming public entrance. The façade allows light and diffused views into the lobby by day, and is transformed into a glowing beacon at night. The station achieves a high LEED® certification.

    The facility is located at 2111 E. First Street in Boyle Heights.
  • Hodel Residence, Alexander Zelenko, Architect 1921
    Swiss Chalet style residence designed by Russian Alexander Zelenko in 1921. He was an early advocate of the art nouveau in the towns of Samara and Moscow, Russia. He traveled to the United States in 1903 and 1904, during which time he switched his focus from architecture to education. In 1905 he joined Stanislav Shatsky and Louise Shleger on a commune project and in the following year, helped set up the state-funded Settlement Society for training and professional education. In 1907, he designed the Communal Club for Children in Moscow, funded by industrialist Nikolay Krotov. The castle-like expressionist structure is often compared to the work of Antonin Gaudi and Friedensreich Hundertwasser.

    After the Settlement was disbanded in 1908, Zelenko was sent to jail, and after a few months fled to the United States. Upon his return in 1910, he returned to architectural practice while working with Shatksy and lecturing at Shanyavsky University. Before the advent of World War I, he designed the wooden dacha Pfeffer House in Sokolniki and Kindergarten in Khamovniki and other buildings.

    The Hodel Residence is located at 6512 Monterey Road in the Hermon neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 802) in 2005.
  • Hiner House, Carl Boller c.1922
    Theater Architect Carl Boller designed the English Tudor style house for music professor Dr. Edwin C. Hiner in 1922. Hiner was founder of the music department at the old Los Angeles Normal School, which later became the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). He was also the director of a popular brass band. The unique style of the house has also been described as 'California Chalet.' Stones from the nearby Arroyo Seco were use extensively in its construction.

    Located at 4757 N. Figueroa Street in the Highland Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1972 (No. 105)
  • Hillside House, Carl Louis Maston, Architect 1962
    Maston designed the house for himself and his wife in 1962. The three level house is set into a 45-degree angle hill, preserving the natural hillside setting while the house serves as its own retaining wall. A windowless wall on the lower level serves as a base for the glass-walled top floor; the front door, located at the rear of the parking area leads to a stairway to the living quarters. Located at 8707 St. Ives Drive.
  • Highland Park Ebell Club, Sumner Hunt and Silas Burns 1912
    Architects Sumner Hunt and Silas Burns designed the clubhouse in an eclectic style, combining Mission Revival, Italianate and Prairie architectural influences. The club is an important civic and social center for the community. Located at 131 S. Avenue 57 in the historic Highland Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1984 (No. 284).
  • High Tower c.1920
    Hollywood's romantic high tower stands as a lone sentry at the foot of High Tower Drive in the Hollywood Hills, surrounded by Streamline Moderne buildings designed by Architect Carl Kay in the 1930s. The tower is reminiscent of the towers built by noble families in Italy between the 12th and 13th century as a sign of their power and prestige. Only in Hollywood!
  • Higgins-Verbeck-Hirsch Mansion, John C. Austin, Architect 1902








    The mansion was originally located at 2619 Wilshire Boulevard but was moved to its current location in 1920. Designed in an elegant Victorian style, the house features classical details such s leaded glass windows, varying roof lines, a barrell-shaped turret, wrap-around porch and pyramidal and conical shapes.

    The house was listed as a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 403) in 1988. Located at 637 S. Lorraine Boulevard in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Hermez' Hideaway, Hernandez Design Associates 2010

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    Hermez' Hideway, the personal residence of the husband and wife design team, Tony and Chelsea Hernandez. Columbian-born Tony received his architectural training at the Universidad del Valle de México. In the USA, he continued his studies at Santa Monica College and UCLA. He met Texas native Chelsea while both were associated with Dougall Design Associates. a renowned casino design firm where Tony served as the principal designer for such legendary properties as Planet Hollywood Resort and Casino, London Club International, Mandalay Bay Hotel & Casino, Borgata Hotel, Casino & Spa (Atlantic City) amongst others. After leaving Dougall, Tony' reputation went with him; he landed other important commissions under his own firm HDA Associates, including Plane Hollywood Resort & Casino (Manila Bay); Sharm El Sheik Resort Complex (Egypt) ; Planet Lounge (Mumbai, India for Planet Hollywood International); Barras e Piaxtla Resort Complex (Mexico) and a retail promenade in Sinola, Mexico.
    As fresh and innovative forces in the hospitality design industry, Tony and Chelsea brought the same level of sophistication and style to the design of their personal residence. Situated on a secluded oak-studded lot of over 18,000 sq. feet in the foothills of Altadena, the house is approached at the end of a long, private drive. Concrete tiles with rectangular openings for things to grow are laid out in a patchwork quilt set at different angles along the driveway and parking pavilion. All is solitude except for the bubbling brook and the quiet rush of wind in the trees. The house itself approaches monumentality; particularly in the context of its setting. The HDA design philosophy, 'balancing fantasy and drama with function' is evident in every aspect. The indoor-outdoor living experience is enhanced by the generous use of high (20') ceilings, floor-to-ceiling windows and roll-up glass doors in the living and dining rooms. The main entrance is through a dramatic foyer, doubling as art gallery. The former garage has been converted into a huge family room, complete with a giant wall-to-wall projector screen, lighted acrylic floor pit, and fabric wall installations. The dining room will accommodate seating for up to twenty dinner guests and has a bonus lounging area. The galley style kitchen is all state-of-the-art appliances and has a breakfast nook. There are three generous size bedrooms and two and one half baths. Along the back of the house there is a seating area with fire pit and water sculpture.
    The house is available for lease, minimum occupancy one year. The house may also be leased furnished or semi-furnished; price negotiable. Available for immediate occupancy; shown only by appointment.
  • Herivel House, 4979 Sycamore Terrace
    Sycamore Terrace, situated on the west side and above Figueroa Street in Highland Park, has a number of historically-significant properties. The Herivel House was designed by the Meyer & Holler Milwaukie Building Company for John Johnson. The actual construction was done by the California Real Estate & Building Company in 1912. It is an excellent example of the Craftsman Style. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1988 (No. 370).
  • Heritage Hall (USC) Grillias Savage Alves, Architects 1969
    Home of the athletic department of the University of Southern California Heritage Hall houses the university's athletic offices and celebrates Trojan prowess on the fields of play. Originally built in 1968, the building has been expanded in size three times to its current 48,000 sq. feet. A mecca for sports enthusiasts, Heritage Hall contains the Heisman trophies of the seven awardees from the University (Mike Garrett, O.J. Simpson, Charles White, Marcus Allen, Carson Palmer, Matt Leinart and Reggie Bush), various NCAA championship trophies, busts of prominent Trojan athletes, coaches and athletic directors, an Honors Rail saluting Trojan Olympians, NCAA individual champions and first team All-Americans.
  • Herbert Woodward Residence, L.B. Kolyer, Architect 1928
    Records show the elegant EnglishTodor house was built by contractor A.J. Showalter from a design by Architect L.B. Kolyer in 1928. The house was the residence of automobile dealer and USC booster Herbert Woodward in the 1930s. Located at 2106 Cedarhurst Drive in Los Feliz.
  • Herald-Examiner Building, Julia Morgan, Architect 1912
    Spanish Colonial Revival style home of the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner newspaper, designed by Architect Julia Morgan, the 'most important female architect of the early 20th Century'. Morgan was a pioneer in the field, overcoming the many obstacles faced by women of the era (a time in which they did not have even the right to vote). She was the first female graduate of the University of California Civil Engineering program, and the first woman to be trained at Paris' famed Ecole de Beaux Arts, considered the most important school of classical architecture of the period.

    She served an apprenticeship under San Francisco Architect Bernard Maybeck (designer of San Francisco's famed 'Palace of Fine Arts'). Maybeck claimed 'there was never a job too large or too small for her.' During her long career, Morgan designed over 600 buildings; the Heast Castle (San Simeon) for publisher William Randolph Hearst and the Y.W.CA. Hollywood Studio Club are among her accomplishments (the latter was home to both Marilyn Monroe and Kim Novak).

    The Herald-Examiner Building is located at 1111 South Broadway in downtown Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles-Civic Cultural Monument in 1977 (No. 178).
  • Henry O. Bollman Residence, Lloyd Wright 1922
    Architect Lloyd Wright maintained that the house he designed for Henry Bollman was the first to use the 'knit-block' construction, a method usually attributed to his father, Frank Lloyd Wright. The iconic four-bedroom, two-bath house in 2518 sq. most recently (July 2014) was listed for sale and sold for $1.9M, and was described in the listing as 'Wright's personal vision of a new American architecture is expressed here with an innovative building system utilizing pre-cast concrete blocks to structurally & decoratively augment standard building methodologies. The style draws from theatrical and Mesoamerican precedents imparting a dramatic temple-like feeling of intimacy. By the time Designer Mimi London came upon the property it had fallen into disrepair. London's work to renovate and re-interpret the residence has earned two covers of Architectural Digest! Her renovations have made the house more functional; better serving modern lifestyles with a new kitchen, baths, and an expansion of living space into what was the attached garage. Tropical plantings, including Trumpet Vine, Black Bird of Paradise, & Monstera Deliciosa impart a feeling of living in a tropical garden'.

    Located at 1530 Ogden Drive in Hollywood, California.
  • Henry M. Robinson Laboratory of Astrophysics, Mayers Murray & Phillip (formerly Goodhue Associates)
    The Spanish Colonial Revival style Henry M. Robinson Laboratory of Astrophysics was originally designed in 1932 by the firm of Mayers Murray & Phillip (formerly Goodhue Associates) in collaboration with Russell W. Porter, a noted designer of telescopes and observatories in the early twentieth century.

    The monumental structure combines the Spanish Colonial Revival style with fine decorative details and stencil decoration by artisans from the A. T. Heinsbergen and Company, including celestial starbursts and signs of the zodiac. The laboratory housed Caltech’s astronomers and astrophysicists for nearly eighty years during which time Caltech co-founder andastrophysicist George Ellery Hale built the 200-inch telescope on Mount Palomar.

    In 2008, Caltech began the process of repurposing the facility under the guidance of Architectural Resources Group, Inc., transforming the labratory to house the new Ronald and Maxine Linde Center for Global Environmental Science, 'devoted to developing solutions to the world’s complex environmental problems'. Proclaiming that 'life should mimic ideals', they designed the nation’s first LEED Platinum laboratory in a historic building. The project was recipient of the 2012 Los Angeles Conservancy Preservation Award.

    Located at 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, California on the campus of California Institute of Technology. Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • Helios House, Nader Tehrani & Monica Ponce de Leon, OfficedA Architects 2007
    A traffic stopper at the intersection of Robertson and Olympic Blvd. in West Los Angeles, Helios House is a gas station like none other. Designed by the Boston-based firm, OfficedA Architects with Nader Tehrani and Monica Ponce de Leon as principal architects, the BP gas station explores 'consumer receptivity to green design, using education, eco-friendly and recycled materials'.

    Helios House is the first gas station in the U.S. to be submitted to L.E.E.D., (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design), considered the benchmark of the U.S. Green Building Council, which 'verifies the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings'. According to BP, Helios House 'exceeds current environmental standards for on-site water collection and uses 16 percent less electricity than traditional stations'. Besides, it's a sight to see!

    Helios House is located at 8770 West Olympic Blvd. in Los Angeles.
  • Helene Kershner House, Harwell Hamilton Harris 1935
    The redwood house architect Harwell Hamilton Harris designed for Helen Kershner is remotely situated at the terminus of a steep and narrow, single lane street in Echo Park. Although I had made a mental note of the striking appearance of the house on previous visits to the area, it wasn't until recently that I learned of its design pedigree. The house hovers dramatically over the drop-off of land; a platform on a hillside that required structural enhancements with outriggers at each bay and angled wood braces and steel rods forming a buttress which end up heightening the overall effect. The house was an immediate success, winning the House Beautiful Small House Competition in 1937 and first prize in the Pittsburgh Glass Institute competition for the best small house costing under $12,000 (outperforming two houses submitted by Richard Neutra).


    Located at 2635 Fellowship Parkway in the Echo Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Heart House, John and Donald Parkinson, Architects 1910
    The list of contributions by the Parkinson architectural firm is impressive! From the Italian Renaissance style buildings at the University of Southern California (Science Hall, Physical Education Building, Bridge Hall, Wilson Student Union, Bovard Administration) to the Art Deco/Moderne (Bullocks Wilshire Department Store, Union Station, Manuel Arts High School), the father and son team have made a second-to-none contribution to Los Angeles' built environment.

    The Heart House in the Westlake-Hancock Park neighborhood is one of the few remaining Craftsman style single family homes designed by the firm, completed in 1910. Located at 112 North Harvard Boulevard and designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 2000 (No. 684).
  • Hawthorne School, Ralph C. Flewelling 1929
    Spanish Colonial Revival style designed by architect Ralph C. Flewelling c.1929. The tower, crowned with a dome of glazed colored tiles is reminiscent in style of the Beverly Hills City Hall located several blocks away (but within view).

    The firm, Flewelling & Moody, has antecedents dating to 1928. Ralph C. Flewelling, the firm's founder, also designed the Mudd Memorial Hall of Philosophy at the University of Southern California in 1928, for which he received the AIA Gold Medal for America's Most Beautiful Building. He later designed other USC buildings including the Fisher Gallery of Art and the Harris Hall of Architecture & Fine Arts.

    Located at 624 North Rexford Drive in Beverly Hills, California.
  • Hartung House, E.F. Schaffer, Architect 1925
    The house was designed for Rosa Hartung in 1925 by architect-builder E.F. Schaffer in an eclectic style with English Tudor and French Country style elements. Located at 3473 Rowena Avenue in the Franklin Hills neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Harpel House, John Lautner, Architect 1956
    Lautner designed the house for William Harpel, a radio announcer and acquaintence of Leonard Malin ( who commissioned the nearby Chemosphere, visible from the hill above). The house was one of four on the John Lautner 100th Birthday Architecture Tour, July 23, 2011. The house is located at 7764 Tarreyson Drive in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles.
  • Hamilton-Rabinovitz House, Buff, Smith + Hensman, Architects 1991

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    The architectural firm Buff + Hensman had its beginning in the classrooms of the USC School of Architecture. Conrad Buff III and Donald Hensman met there as students and joined the faculty upon graduation. The idea of a partnership came from Calvin Straub, a gifted professor; the firm Buff, Straub and Hensman was formed in 1958. Dennis Smith, a student of all three, worked for the firm and others after graduation in 1960, returning as an associate in 1974. Smith became a partner in 1988 and succeeded Hensman as president in 1988.

    The Hamilton-Rabinovitz House, located at 1010 Kewen Drive in San Marino, developed out of the owner's wish to save an existing 1920s cottage, pool and trees. The firm added over 5000 feet of new living space, preserving the cottage as a guest suite. The house is designed on a bold scale with large, open spaces; a dramatic contrast with the intimate interior vignettes. Each wing of the house is connected by bridges and terraces, all having views of the pool.
  • Hamilton House, Marston, Van Pelt & Maybury, Architects 1924
    Colonial Revival home designed for F. and H.M. Hamilton by the distinguished firm, Marston, Van Pelt & Maybury in 1924. Other designs by the firm include: 1st National Bank of Chino; 1st Presbyterian Church of Alhambra; Pasadena American Legion, Hall; Casa del Cielo, Pasadena; Nicholson, Grace, Building, Pasadena; Pasadena United Presbyterian Church; Villa Verde, Pasadena and Westminster Presbyterian Church, Pasadena 1925.

    The house is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Located at 445 Prospect Square in the Prospect Historic District of Pasadena, California.
  • Hall of the Crucifixion & Resurrrection, Roy W. Donlay, Architect 1950
    Dedicated on Good Friday, 1951, the Hall of the Crucifixion & Resurrection was designed and built for the exclusive purpose of displaying the enormous painting 'The Crucifixion' by Jan Styka, painted in 1895. It is the largest canvas painting on display in the world measuring 195 feet in length and 45 feet in height. It took the artist nearly 17 years to complete.

    The edifice is of an Italian Renaissance design by Roy W. Donley with David S. Allison acting as consulting architect. The building crowns a hilltop within Forest Lawn Memorial Park located at 1712 S. Glendale Avenue in Glendale.
  • Hall of Justice, Allied Architects 1922
    The Hall of Justice was the centerpiece of the Los Angeles County justice system for more than seventy years until it was severly damaged in the 1994 Northridge Earthquake. The building was home to Los Angeles County's courts, coroner, sheriff, and district attorney's offices at the time. It also served as the primary county jail. Famous inmates include Charles Manson and Sirhan Sirhan. Actress Marilyn Monroe and presidential candidate Robert Kennedy had their autopsies performed here. The building was frequently featured in television shows including Dragnet and Get Smart.

    The Hall of Justice is located at 210 W. Temmple Street in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Hale House, 3800 Homer Street, Heritage Square

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    The 'main attraction' at Los Angeles' Heritage Square, the Hale House has been fully restored to its original 1887 elegance. The house was originally located at 4501 North Figueroa Street in Highland Park at a time when the area was quite fashionable, then moved to 4425 North Figueroa before being purchased by James G. Hale in 1906. The Hale Family retained ownership of the property until 1970, when it was acquired by the Heritage Square Museum.

    The house, built by George W. Morgan in 1887 is the largest property in the Heritage Square complex. It is a very fine example of the Queen Anne and Eastlake Victorian styles. It was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (no. 40) in 1970.
  • Haigh House, Wesley Eager, Architect 1935

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    Haigh House is a fine example of the Streamline Moderne Style that flourished in Los Angeles in the 1930s. Signature elements of the design include the generous use of glass block, curving walls and matching contours such as railings. The Haigh House is actually a duplex that has been cleverly designed to look very much like a single family residence.

    The Haigh House is located at 4004-4006 Franklin Avenue adjacent to the famed Shakespeare Bridge.
  • Gwynn Wilson Student Union Building, USC, John & Donald Parkinson, Architects, 1927
    One of six buildings built on the main campus of the University of Southern California between 1923 and 1928, the Gwynn Wilson Student Union is my personal favorite. Designed in the North Italian Renaissance style, the building is richly decorated with 'whimsical carvings of college life' by Adolphe of Gladding-McBean, including a portrait of a monkey thumbing its nose at Chancellor Rufus B. Von KleinSmid. Tradition has it that the artist grew tired of the Chancellor's oversight and carved the monkey as a way of getting back at him! In the foreground is the Shumway Fountain, a gift from USC Trustee Forrest Shumway and his wife Patsy, dedicated in 1984.
  • Guasti Villa, Hudson & Munsell Architects 1910
    Secundo Guasti, was a poor farm laborer who immigrated to Los Angeles from Asti, Italy in 1878. Hired as a cook at a local Italian restaurant, he fell in love and married the daughter of the proprietor. The pair purchased 5,000 acres near present-day Ontario Airport in 1901; within a few years, the property Italian Vineyard Company, became the largest winery in California. Guasti built a 'company town' around the vineyard, importing whole families from Italy. The town had its own railroad station, school and general store. The winery had a tragic ending, however in 1902; a locomotive derailed at the site, killing thirty-two men in the process. Guasti had a cemetary built nearby. The winery never recovered. (the winery is a present-day tourist attraction; called the 'Haunted Vineyard', located at 3099 Guasti Road)

    In 1910, Guasti had a grand mansion designed for him in the elegant West Adams neighborhood, selecting Hudson & Munsell as architects. After Guasti's death in 1927, the family sold the mansion to famed Film Director/Choreographer Busby Berkeley. The mansion is one of the finest examples of late 18th Century French Beaux-Arts style in Los Angeles.

    The Guasti Villa is located at 3500 West Adams Blvd. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1936 (No. 478).
  • Griffith Observatory, John C. Austin & F.M. Ashley, Designers, 1935
    A fine example of the Art Deco, Griffith Observatory was a gift to the public from wealthy mining speculator, Griffith Jenkins Griffith. Although he never witnessed its completion, (Griffith died in 1919), he left a significant trust fund to complete his dreams for the park including a Greek amphitheater (the Greek Theatre, completed in 1930) as well as a hall of science and an observatory.

    The Art Deco theme is enhanced by a fine mural around the rotunda by Hugo Ballin and ceiling decorations in terracotta by Anthony Heinsbergen. The courtyard has a fine sculpture entitled the 'Astronomer's Monument' depicting six famous astronomers, a design by Archibald Garner with six contributing sculptors including Garner, Djey el Djey, Arnold Forester, Roger Noble Burnham, Roger Newell and George Stanley. (Artist Stanley, who sculpted the monument's Isaac Newton, also created the famous 'Oscar' statuette, with Cedric Gibbons).

    The Griffith Observatory was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1976 (No. 168).

    The Griffith Observatory re-opened in November 2006. The expanded facility has doubled in exhibit space and has been restored to its original art deco elegance.
  • Grier Musser Museum, 403 S. Bonnie Brae St., Los Angeles

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    The Grier Musser Museum is an 1898 Queen Anne/ Colonial Revival house. Its architectural details include shingling, brackets, plasterwork, turned woodwork, porch columns, a dentil course, and flat window & door openings. Its intact condition and architectural quality make it a significant feature within the Westlake area. In 1987, the museum became cultural monument #333 of Los Angeles.

    To visit the museum, please call (213) 413-1814 for reservations, or for more information visit our website: griermussermuseum.com
  • Grey House, Elmer Grey Architect 1911
    Distinguised Architect Elmer Grey, FAIA (1872 – 1963) chose an Italianate theme for the design of his personal residence in the upscale Oak Knoll neighborhood of Pasadena. During a long and distinguished career, the architect designed many noted landmarks in Southern California, including the Beverly Hills Hotel, the Huntington Art Gallery, the Pasadena Playhouse and Wattles Mansion. He was a pioneer in the development of an American style of architecture, with an emphasis on harmony with nature. Located at 1372 S. El Molino Avenue in the Oak Knoll neighborhood of Pasadena.
  • Great Western Forum, Charles Luckman Associates 1966
    The Forum (known also as the Great Western Forum) was one of the best-known sports venues in the US achieving its greatest fame as the home of the Los Angeles Lakers and the Los Angeles Kings betweem 1967 and 1999, when both teams moved to Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles. The facility hosted the 1972 and 1983 NBA All-Star Games, the 1981 NHL All-Star Game, the 1984 Summer Olympics Basketball tournament and the 1989 Pacific-10 Conference men's basketball tournament.

    Since 2000, the Forum been owned by the Faithful Central Bible Church, occasionally using it for church services and also leasing the building for sporting events and other events. The Forum is located at 3900 West Manchester Boulevard in Inglewood, California.
  • Great Mausoleum, Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale
    Moving to Glendale (CA) in the late fifties, it was a regular ritual to take our out-of-town guests to see the replicas of famous statues and other works of art to be found at Forest Lawn Memorial Park. The world-famous cemetary attracts over a million visitors a year. Established in 1906 by Dr. Herbert L. Eaton, a firm believer in a 'joyous life after death' who pledged to build a great park that reflected his optimism, filled with 'towering trees, sweeping lawns, splashing fountains, beautiful statuary, and...memorial architecture...'

    There are now six Forest Lawn cemetries scattered around southern California, containing a total of about 1500 statues. Highlights at the Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale (the first and most famous of the six) include a re-creation of Leonardo da Vinci's The Last Supper rendered in stained glass, full-size reproductions of Michelangelo's Moses and David, and three lovely reproductions of quaint English village churches. The Great Mausoleum said to be inspired by the Campo Santo in Genoa, Italy has been called the 'New World's Westminster Abbey' by Time Magazine. Among the hundreds of celebrities buried here are Gracie Allen, Humphrey Bogart, Gutzon Borglum (sculptor of Mt. Rushmore), Nat 'King' Cole, Sammy Davis, Jr., Walt Disney, W.C. Fields, Errol Flynn, Clark Gable, Evangelist Aimee Semple McPherson, Red Skelton and Jimmy Stewart.
  • Grauman's Chinese Theatre- Raymond M. Kennedy, Meyer & Holler, Architects 1927
    After the completion of the nearby Egyptian Theater, Sid Grauman returned to the architectural firm, Meyer & Holler for the design of another 'theme' movie palace meant to imitate a giant Chinese pagoda. Its principal features include a great dragon and two Ming 'heaven' dogs guarding the main entrance, a copper roof lined with tiny dragons, and of course, the world-famous courtyard with the imprints of approximately 200 Hollywood celebrity autographs, hand and footprints.

    Grauman's Chinese Theatre is located at 6925 Hollywood Blvd. in Hollywood. In 1968, it was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.
  • Granada Buildings, Franklin Harper, Architect 1927








    Granada Shoppes and Studios, also known as the Granada Buildings, is a Spanish Colonial Revival courtyard complex designed by Architect Franklin Harper in 1927.

    When the architect announced plans for the $1 million project in 1927, the Los Angeles Times described the structure as 'something entirely new in Los Angeles, resembling the design of European specialty shops'. The complex was designated a Historic Cultural Monument (HCM # 238) by the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission in April 1981 and listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1986.

    A courtyard running between four separate structures functions as both a pathway between the suites and a garden providing shade. Located at 672 S. Lafayette Park Place in the Westlake District of Los Angeles.
  • Graham House, Frank L. Meline, Designer 1917
    Architectural Historian Laura Massino Smith affectionally refers to the Graham House as the 'Wedgewood House' inasmuch as it looks like a piece of fine Wedgewood China. Th blue-and-white house is an interesting combination of styles with a Spanish terra cotta tile roof and Neo-Classical columns and sculpture.

    Meline also designed the original Romanesque Revival style Fox Theater in Hollywood (1918) and the Windsor Estate (1918) in Windsor Square, former home of actor John Barrymore and opera singer Lawrence Tibbitt.

    The house is just a few doors away from Lloyd Wright's fabled Sowden House at 5137 Franklin Avenue.
  • Grace Nicholson Building, Marston, Van Pelt & Maybury 1924
    A Chinese palace designed for Grace Nicholson, a dealer in Asian art and books. Ms. Nicholson kept a retail shop here and lived in the private quarters. In later years, the house became the Pasadena Museum of Art before it moved elsewhere, and is currently the home of the Pacific-Asia Museum. Erickson, Peters & Thomas Associates designed a lovely Asian garden that was added to the central courtyard in 1979.

    Located at 46 N. Los Robles Avenue in the central business district of Pasadena, California.
  • Goodwill Industries, William Dale Brantley (aArts Architecture), 1999
    Designed by veteran westside architect William Dale Brantley, the structure is an outstanding example of post-modern architecture. The idea, according to art historian Laura Massino Smith is the 'glorification of technology and the concept that the process of a building's construction is more interesting than a finished product covered by walls.'*

    The Goodwill Industries Thrift and Donation Center is located at 4575 Hollywood Blvd. in Los Feliz.

    *Laura Massino Smith is a brilliant source of information on the local architecture scene. Her guidebooks and customized tours of Los Angeles architecture are a great resource for the enthusiast.
  • Gold House, R.M. Schindler 1945
    As part of the MAK Center Architectural Tour of 10-10-10, we visited the Schindler-designed Gold House, located at 3758 Reklaw Drive in Studio City. The house has been enlarged since Schindler completed the project in 1945. During a renovation in the late 1990's, an adjacent vacant lot was purchased, allowing for an extension of the kitchen and the additon of a new breakfast room,a secondary living/dining space and a pool and studio room on the lower level
  • Gogol House, Raphael Soriano, Architect 1939
    Soriano designed the house for surgeon Louis J. Gogol and his wife in 1939. The design has been called the 'purest example of the architect's early work, and 'pivotal to the evolution of the modern California house'.

    The 3 bedroom house is currently on the market (May 2011) priced at $1,195,000; a rare opportunity to own an important residence by an iconic, mid-century modern architect. Located at 2190 Talmadge Street in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.



  • Glendale Southern Pacific Railroad Depot- Kenneth MacDonald & Maurice Cuchot, Architects 1923
    Serving as the Glendale Amtrak/Metrolink Station, the station was originally known as the Glendale Southern Pacific Railroad Depot. Designed in the Spanish Mission Revival Style in 1923, it replaced an older facility dating from 1883. The station is an important stopping point for passenger travel between San Luis Obispo and San Diego.

    On September 20, 1959, Soviet Premier Nikita Krushev made a famous stop here. In 1997, it was listed in the National Register of Historic Places and the Glendale Register of Historic Places. The entire complex was renovated recently.

    The Glendale Southern Pacific Railroad Depot is located at 400 Cerritos Avenue in Glendale.
  • Glendale Municipal Services Building, Merrill W. Baird, A.C. Martin Architects 1966
    In the early 1950s, Glendale was a typical suburb without a distinct identity. Incorporated in 1908, the community experienced rapid growth, largely due to its proximity to downtown Los Angeles (ten miles south), and today is the third largest city in Los Angeles County with a population of approximately 200,000.

    As population began to explode after World War II, Glendale began to express a unique identity, setting itself apart from its larger neighbor, Los Angeles, embracing Modernism as an expression of its forward-thinking. Anchored by and complimenting the adjacent Moderne Style Glendale City Hall (designed by architect Albert E. Hansen,1940-42), the Municipal Services Building serves as a key element of Glendale's Civic Center, anchoring the intersection of East Broadway and Glendale Avenue. Upon completion, City Manager C.E. Perkins exclaimed, 'The new building reflects the evolution of Glendale from a suburban bedroom community to an independent city.'



  • Glendale Fire Station No. 22, Leach Mounce Architects 1989-1990
    I have passed by the red-brick firehouse a thousand times, noting its special beauty. The building was designed by Leach Mounce Architects in 1990, the same year as the merger of H. Wendell Mounce, AIA & Associates, of Glendale, California, and Leach Kehoe Architects, of Ventura, California. Both firms were founded in 1962.

    Located at 1201 S. Glendale Avenue in Glendale, California.
  • Glendale Federal Savings & Loan Building, W.A. Sarmiento, Designer, 1959
    In 2007, Glendale has one of the largest banking communities in California and Brand Boulevard, Glendale's 'Main Street' is a boulevard of tall buildings. In 1957, (when my dad accepted a position with Van de Kamp's Holland-Dutch Bakeries and we moved to Southern California) Brand Boulevard was a typical suburban 'main street' with only a few structures over a couple of stories tall. When 'Glendale Fed' was completed in 1959, it was the tallest building in town and an instant hit.

    The landmark is one of the best examples of the Corporate International Style. Its distinctive features are a red brick 'fire tower' and horizontal, solar-powered blue louvers which pivot with the angle of the sun throughout the day, pouring sunlight into the interior.

    In 2000, the building was listed in the California Survey of Historic Landmarks, thanks to a successful preservation campaign led by the Glendale Historical Society and the Los Angeles Conservancy.

    The Glendale Federal Savings & Loan Building is located at 401 N. Brand Blvd.
  • Glendale City Hall, Albert E. Hansen, Architect 1940-42
    A fine example of the classical Moderne style, a favored style of public buildings built in the United States between the Great Depression and the advent of America's participaton in World War II.

    Glendale's City Hall is located at the northwest corner of Broadway and Howard Street.
  • Gilmore House, Roehrig and Locke Architects 1892
    Quincy Adams Gilmore, a prominent Pasadena businessman, engaged the partnership of Frederick Louis Roehrig & Seymour Locke to design the Neoclassical Victorian house for his family in 1892 after moving to Southern California in the 1880s.

    Located at 1245 North Garfield Avenue in the historic Garfield Heights neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • Gillis House, Myron Hunt & Elmer Grey 1910
    Although Santa Monica was founded, planned and plotted as early as 1875 (by city founders Senator John P. Jones and landowner Colonel Robert S. Baker) the earliest homes I have been able to locate are the half dozen or so Craftsman style homes, ringling the palisades of Santa Monica along Adelaide Drive. The Gillis House, located at the corner of Adelaide and 4th Street is an outstanding example.
  • George C. Page Museum, Thornton & Fagan Associates AIA 1977
    The Page Museum of La Brea Discoveries was the gift of Philanthropist George C. Page, Founder of Mission Pak, a firm which specialized in packaging and mailing California fruits before the days of refrigerated trucking, and which made him a fortune. Mr. Page never ceased to be grateful for all his blessings. His life was marked by great philanthropy. In addition to the Page Museum, he established a youth center in Hawthorne, CA and provided major donations to both private and public institutions.

    Although some of the most important discoveries from the La Brea Tar Pits are at the main Natural History Museum in Exposition Park, and in other natural history museums around the world, the Page Museum is dedicated to the preservation, interpretation and exhibition of the remaining artifacts retrieved from the La Brea Tar Pits. In addition to displaying the skeletons of animals preserved in the tar, a windowed 'fish bowl' laboratory allows visitors to watch scientists at work cleaning and preserving new finds from the tar pits.

    The Page Museum is located at 5801 Wilshire Boulevard in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • George Bauer Residence- Harwell Hamilton Harris, Architect 1938
    The George Bauer Residence expresses the architect's vision of architecture as art in this elegant home in Glenoaks Canyon. An impression of serenity and space is achieved by opening one room into another and the use of dramatic slanting rooflines and Japanese-influenced details. Described in California Arts & Architecture as 'simple, light and playful', the influence of both Frank Lloyd Wright and Richard Neutra can be seen in the design.

    The George Bauer Residence is located at 2528 E. Glenoaks Blvd. in Glendale. For more information about the architect, the book 'Harwell Hamilton Harris' by Lisa Germany makes for enjoyable reading.
  • Gaytonia Apartments, Reginald Inwood 1930
    Architect Reginald Inwood designed the Norman Revival style Gaytonia Apartments, complete with turrets, crenelations, pointed arches and half-timbering for builder George Gaytonin 1930 (he also designed thenow demolished Belmont Theater for Gayton). IN its heydey, the Gaytonia catered to Naval officers stationed at the Long Beach Naval Shipyard. A vintage rooftop neon sign completes the picture. Located at 212 Quincy Avenue in the Belmont Heights neighborhood of Long Beach.
  • Gavit-De Salis House, John Pugsley, Architect 1961
    Architect John Pugsley designed many fine homes in the Pasadena area in the 1960s, notably the 'Eyebrow House', located at 1451 S. El Molino Avenue; the Craven Court Townhouses on Orange Grove Avenue and a pool home at 1241 Encino Avenue.

    The house is currently the home of Sarah Gavit, Program Manager for the Jet propulsion Laboratory Solar Sail Technology Program, and André de Salis, Lead Industrial Designer at Technicolor.

    Located at 580 Arbor Street in Pasadena, California.

  • Garrison Center for the Performing Arts, Millard Sheets Associates 1963
    Architect Millard Sheets, who served on the faculty of Claremont College, thought the International Style too austere; his architectural style typically adds classical elements (columns, sculpture and mosaics) as reflected in the many Home Savings buildings he designed during the 60's. A large mosaic mural by Sheets depicts characters from three Shakespeare plays: Antony and Cleopatra, Romeo and Juliet, and King Lear.

    Located at 231 East 10th Street in Claremont, California.
  • Garcia House, John Lautner 1962; Marmol Radziner (Remodel)
    The Garcia House is way cooler than revealed in this photo! One of these days I hope to see the inside-as well as the rest of the exterior. The house, which clings to a steep hillside on Los Angeles' famed Mulholland Drive, had fallen upon hard times until purchased by Dreamworks executive Bill Damaschke and partner John McIlwee, an entertainment business manager. They in turn hired mid-century restoration specialist Marmol Radziner, to restore and update the Lautner design, while remaining faithful to the original.

    The Garcia House is 7346 Mulholland Drive in the Hollywood Hills.



  • Gantert House, Pierre Koenig, Architect 1981
    Koenig considered the Gantert House his most demanding commission; designing a home on an 'un-buildable' on a steep, 45 degree slope lot. The architect answered the challenge by innovative design: prefabricated steel was brought by truck to the lower edge of the site, and hoisted by crane. The steel frame became its own scaffolding with all interior components installed from withing the structure.

    In 2003, Koenig started an extensive renovation of the house, shortly before his passing. Koenig chose Architect James Tyler to complete the work after his death in April 2004. Located at 6431 La Punta Drive in Los Angeles.
  • Gamble House, Charles & Henry Greene, Architects 1908
    Considered to be the finest example of the American Arts & Crafts movement in architecture, the Gamble House was built for David & Mary Gamble, principal of the Proctor and Gamble Company. The Greenes spared no expense in creating both house and furnishings noted for their exquisite craftsmanship.

    The Gamble House is located at 4 Westmoreland Place in Pasadena. It is administered jointly by the City of Pasadena and the University of Southern California. It is a National Historic Landmark.
  • Galen Center (USC), Fernando Vasquez, HNTB Architecture 2006
    A long-awaited indoor sports arena for the University of Southern California finally began construction on October 31, 2004 under the direction of HNTB Architecture. Designed by the firm's Fernando Vasquez, the mega arena compliments the other brick-clad buildings on the main campus; its massive brick pillars reminiscent of Edward D. Stone's design for the Waite Phillips Hall of Education. Huge bas-relief sculptures of athletes, cap-and-gown graduates and dancers adorn the corners. The interior houses the main arena, a practice facility and administrative offices. A huge picture window on the arena's north side dramatically frames a view of the downtown Los Angeles skyline.

    The USC basketball program waited for over 100 years for the realization of their own arena. Gifts totalling $50 million from long-time Trojan booster Louis Galen and his wife Helen made the center possible. The Center cost an estimated $147 million to complete, including the arena, team offices and a practice facility. Teams began competing in the arena in October 2006.
  • G.W.E. Griffith House, 5915 Echo Street, Highland Park
    The Griffith House is an outstanding example of the Colonial Revival Style with the addition of some interesting Moorish details. Believed to be designed by Architect Fred R. Dorn, it was one of several homes built by the architect for Griffith during the period. The house was built in 1903 and originally stood at 110 South Avenue 58. It was moved to its present location in 1914.
    Declared an Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles in 1988 (No. 374).
  • Furlong House, Frank Tyler, Architect 1910

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    Furlong House was designed by architect Frank Tyler and built in 1910 by Hugh M. and Margaret Cowper. In 1921 the home was purchased by Thomas J. Furlong, the City Clerk and Treasurer of the City of Vernon. The house is on the National Register of Historic Places for its architectural merits, but its most interesting aspect is its service for almost forty years as the home of an important part of the Furlong family, who were instrumental in creating the City of Vernon, once Los Angeles's principal industrial suburbs, and who guided its affairs from 1905 until 1974.

    The home was purchased in 1958 by the Cercle Catholique Francais, providing aid to recently-arrived French immigrants until 1964, when it was sold to Ernest Johnson, a clerk on the Southern Pacific Railroad, from whom the present authors bought the house in March 1988. The house remains much as it was in the days when Thomas and Robert Furlong lived there. Many of the original light fixtures from 1910 are still in service. The house was fully restored by the current owners in 1999.

    The Furlong House is described as Tudor-Craftsman in style. It is located at 2657 S. Van Buren Place in the historic West Adams neighborhood of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 2000 (No. 678).

    Real estate developer Percy H. Clark built six of the homes on the 2600 block of Van Buren Place between 1903 and 1916, ranging in style from Craftsman, Shingle-Craftsman and Tudor-Craftsman. The block is on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Thanks to Jennifer Chernofsky, current owner of the Furlong House, for providing this information as well as introducing me to her neighbors and giving me a tour of her neighborhood on June 24, 2010.

  • French Chateau Apartments, Arlos Sedgley, Architect 1937
    Originally configured as apartments, the units have undergone extensive restoration and have been converted to condominiums. As of November 12, 2008, five units were available for sale; the lowest, a one bedroom, one bath, 1169 sq. ft. unit for $439,000.

    The renovated property is an 'exquisite' representation of some of Los Angeles finest historic architecture, evocative of the glamour of Hollywood that makes Los Angeles special, according to the listing broker.

    Le French Chateau is located at 900 South Hobart Blvd. in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. In 2005, the complex was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 815).
  • Freeman House, Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect 1924
    Built by the master architect, Frank Lloyd Wright for Samuel and Harriet Freeman in 1924. The young couple entertained the rich and famous in this house during a nearly sixty year time span. Harriet Freeman, in particular, loved the avante-garde arts and culture scene; her salons brought together visitors and guests including Clark Gable, Martha Graham, Xavier Cugat, Richard & Dionne Neutra, Edward Weston, Jean Negulesco and Galka Sheyer

    The third of Wright's 'knit-block' houses, the Freeman House expresses the architect's fascination with the Mayan culture, however the radical use of mitered windows which extend from the roof to the floors below transform the house into something distinctly modern.

    In 1986, the house that the Freemans had lived in for 61 years was bequethed to the University of Southern California School of Architecture for its protection and preservation. The house was badly damaged by the Northridge Earthquake in 1994. Funds exceeding $2.5 million have already been spent to shore up the foundation and prevent further erosion. According to Architect-in-Residence Maria Romanach, 'the composition of the textile blocks which Wright used in the construction had troubles from the very beginning. Dirt was mixed in with the concrete to give it a more natural look and the compound proved to be unstable. Wright, who was out of the country much of the time working on more high profile projects such as the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo, dispatched his associate, Rudolf Schindler to come up with a solution. Shindler filled the gaps in the textile blocks with mortar as a means to stabilize them, however the changes compromised the design aesthetic and infuriated Wright. Schindler's 'transgressions' on this and other unauthorized modifications brought about the end of their relationship'.

    Today, Professor Romanach utilizes the house as a teaching laboratory to teach architecture students good principles of design. It is hoped that adequate funding will be raised in the near future to restore this architectural jewel and preserve it for future generations.

    The Freeman House is located at 1962 Glencoe Way in the Hollywood Hills. It was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 247) by the City of Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department in 1981.
  • Fredonia Apartments, Raymond Kappe 1964
    Architect Raymond L. Kappe designed the elliptical Fredonia Apartments in 1964. The sweeping curve of the glass walls provide dramatic views of the valley to the north. Kappe was born in Minneapolis in 1927. In 1940, his family moved to Los Angeles, where he attended Emerson Middle School which had been designed by Richard Neutra. After graduation with honors from the University of California at Berkeley in 1951, he worked in the office of Carl Maston before venturing out on his own in 1954. In academia, he founded the Cal Poly Pomona Department of Architecture (now the School of Environmental Design), resigning in 1972 to help start the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc).

    The Fredonia Apartments are located at 3625 Fredonia Drive in Studio City, California.
  • Francis Howard Goldwyn Regional Branch Library, Gehry Partners 1986
    The formal symmetry of the Francis Howard Goldwyn Library is a departure from the architect's typical body of work. A massive central tower is flanked by two smaller ones, each with north-facing skylights. A circular stairwell leads up to large reading and reference rooms on the second floor. Locate at 1623 Ivar Avenue in the Hollywood district of Los Angeles.
  • Francis House, Reginald O. Johnson 1929
    Reginald Johnson designed the Georgian Revival style house in 1929. The house is located at 415 S. Grand Avenue in the historic Arroyo Seco neighborhood of Pasadena, California.

    Johnson began his career as a partner with the firm Johnson, Kaufmann and Coate in 1925, before establishing his own practice in 1925. He quit in 1934 after 'seeing the squalid conditions of Washington D.C.'s slums,' devoting the rest of his life and energies to public housing and urban rehabilitation.
  • Frances De Pauw House, Bradbeer & Ferris 1894
    The De Pauw Residence was designed for philanthropist Mrs. Francis W. De Pauw in 1897 by James Bradbeer of Bradbeer & Ferris. It was the residence of California Governor William Dennison Stephens in the 1910s. After a brief stint as Mayor of Los Angeles, he served three-terms in the U.S. House of Representatives (1911-1916) and as the 24th governor of California (1917-1923).

    The gable of the house was destroyed by a fire in 1952, and never rebuilt. The house is located at 1146 W. 27th Street in the North University Park National Register Historic District.
  • Frances De Pauw House, Bradbeer & Ferris 1894
    The De Pauw Residence was designed for philanthropist Mrs. Francis W. De Pauw in 1897 by James Bradbeer of Bradbeer & Ferris. It was the residence of California Governor William Dennison Stephens in the 1910s. After a brief stint as Mayor of Los Angeles, he served three-terms in the U.S. House of Representatives (1911-1916) and as the 24th governor of California (1917-1923).

    The gable of the house was destroyed by a fire in 1952, and never rebuilt. The house is located at 1146 W. 27th Street in the North University Park National Register Historic District.
  • Foy House, 1337-1341 Carroll Avenue
    The residence of Mary E. Foy, the first woman to hold the position of City Librarian in 1880. The residence was originally located at the intersection of Figueroa and 7th Streets; then relocated to 633 South Witmer Street (1919-1921). It was moved to its present location in 1993. It was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 8) by the City of Los Angeles in 1962.
  • Forthmann House & Carriage House, Burgess J. Reeve, Architect, c. 1880
    Originally located at 629 West 18th Street and moved to its present location in the West Adams District in 1989, the Forthmann House remains one of the most imposing Victorian homes still intact in Los Angeles. The University of Southern California, located nearby, occupies the edifice as the University Community House.

    The City of Los Angeles declared the Forthmann House an Historic-Cultural Monument in 1972 (No. 102). It is located at 2801 S. Hoover Street.
  • Formosa 1140, Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects 2009
    Formosa 1140 is an 11-unit condominium complex adjoined by a public park designed by Lorcan O’Herlihy for Habitat Group LA, LLC, completed in 2009. The project parceled out a third of the building site for a public-managed pocket park to address the need for green space in the City of West Hollywood. At the time of its initiation, there were only two public parks within the city limits. By building the condos on the left side of the lot, each of the residential units have an entrance that faces the park.

    Located at 1140 North Formosa Avenue in the City of West Hollywood, California.
  • Ford House, Heritage Square
    The Ford House was built in 1887 by the Beaudry Brothers and was situated in downtown Los Angeles on Beaudry Street near Third Street. Its original owner was a gifted wood-carver by the name of John J. Ford. His work was so excellent that it can still be found today in the ornate wood carvings of the Iolani Palace in Hawaii, Leland Stanford's private railroad car and the California State Capital.

    Mr. Ford purchased the home as it was near completion. Ford used his skills to embellish the woodwork in the most ornate one-of-a-kind designs, which makes the house uniquely interesting.
  • Fitzgerald House, Joseph Cather Newsom, Architect 1903
    A romantic 'Italian Gothic' style residence designed for J.T. Fitzgerald by prominent Architect Joseph Cather Newsom in 1903. The once-elegant mansion is in a neglected state and is currently (November 2008) available for sale for $1.9M. Hopefully buyers will be found to restore the mansion, once known as the 'Elegant Manor'.

    The Fitgerald House is located at 3115 West Adams Blvd. In 1982, it was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 258).
  • Fisher Gallery at the University of Southern California, Ralph C. Flewelling, Architect 1939
    Established in 1939, the Fisher Gallery is the oldest museum in Los Angeles devoted exclusively to the exhibition of fine art. It was built at the same time and conjunction with the University of Southern California's School of Architecture & Fine Arts as a gift from Elizabeth Holmes Fisher. Ralph C. Flewelling, who had previously designed the successful Mudd Memorial Hall of Philosophy in 1928, accomplished a more modern design (perhaps in keeping with changing fashion), yet the gallery retains a strong classical character.
  • First United Methodist Church of Glendale- Flewelling+Moody, Architects 1961
    Spending my youth in Glendale in the 1960's, I can remember reacting to this new church being built by the Methodists as 'pretty far out.' It was just a few blocks away from my own church, the then-Gothic Glendale Presbyterian Church, destroyed by the 1971 Sylmar Earthquake. In those days, I suppose, my sensibilities were a bit outraged at this 'extreme' departure from a more traditional church architecture. Thankfully, with the passage of time, my appreciation for a wide range of architectural styles has matured. In Glendale's First United Methodist Church, the architects have blended the heroic proportions of a traditional cathedral with a modern sensibility. Constructed of pre-cast and post-tensioned concrete, a thin shell roof spans the nave without beams or girders. Five stained glass windows on each side, each forty feet high, bathe the sanctuary in resplendent color and light.

    The firm, Flewelling & Moody, has antecedents dating to 1928. Ralph C. Flewelling, the firm's founder, designed the Mudd Memorial Hall of Philosophy at the University of Southern California in 1928, for which he received the AIA Gold Medal for America's Most Beautiful Building. He later designed other USC buildings including the Fisher Gallery of Art and the Harris Hall of Architecture & Fine Arts.

    The First United Methodist Church of Glendale is located at 134 N. Kenwood Street in Glendale.
  • First Presbyterian Church of Hollywood, Henry M. Patterson, Architect 1924








    The Hollywood Presbyterian Church is built in red brick and cast stone in a neo-Gothic style. Stained glass windows designed by Judson Studios grace the sanctuary. The church has been the spiritual home to many Hollywood celebrities. Located at 1760 Gower Street.
  • First Congregational Church Pasadena, Charles Buchanan and Leon Brockway 1904, 1916
    The English Gothic style church was designed by architects Charles Buchanan and Leon Brockway and completed in 1916. The church is located at 464 E Walnut Street.

  • First Congregational Church of Los Angeles, Allison & Allison, Architects 1930-32
    The West Nave Entrance to the church. The Rose Window by Judson Studios illustrates the Christ surrounded by angels, kings, martyrs and prophets.
  • First Congregational Church of Los Angeles, Allison & Allison, Architects 1930-1932
    Engliish Gothic Revival Church by Allison & Allison, Architects who also designed the First Baptist Church of Los Angeles, it is the fifth home of the oldest Protestant congregation in Los Angeles. Built of reinforced concrete, the structure is supported by 500 tons of steel bars. The central tower of the church is modeled after the tower of Magdalen College at Oxford University. The church is noteworthy for its bronze doors added in 1946 (each weighing 1,000 pounds and illustrating the life of Jesus), stained glass windows designed by Judson Studios and its pipe organ, reputed to be one of the largest organs in the world, including more than 20,000 pipes.

    The First Congregational Church of Los Angeles is located at 540 South Commonwealth Avenue (Northwest corner of West Sixth Street).
  • First Congregational Church Los Angeles, Allison & Allison, Architects 1930-32
    Founded in 1867, First Congregational Church of Los Angeles is the oldest Protestant church in continuous service in Los Angeles. The present English Gothic style building is the church's fifth home, designed by James E. and David C. Allison, and completed in 1932. Built of reinforced concrete; imbedded in the concrete are over 500 tons of steel bars.

    When you enter the nave from the narthex, you see ahead of you a beautiful slender window on the east chancel wall. It depicts the life of Christ in a series of 15 medallions and is topped by the trefoil with the traditional symbols of the Trinity — the hand of God, the Lamb of God, and the Dove — grouped about the Bible. The other two chancel windows also show scenes from Christ's life.

    The entire structure, including Shatto Chapel and the Seaver Building, encompasses an area of 157,000 square feet. At its apex is a massive tower, which rises to a height of 157 feet. Its design is reminiscent of the tower of Oxford University's Magdalen College.

  • First Church of Christ, Scientist, Elmer Grey, Architect 1912
    Northern Italian Romanesque in style, the handsome brick edifice features two semicircular entrances or porches with elegant Corinthian columns surmounted by a singular rectangular tower. The ornate design and detailing demonstrate the strength of the Christian Scientists in Los Angeles during the early twentieth century.

    Other prominent commissions by Elmer Grey include the main buildings of the Beverly Hills Hotel (1912) and the Pasadena Playhouse (1924). In association with Myron Hunt, he also designed the Wattles Mansion and Gardens (1907) and the Huntington Mansion (now the Huntington Library) .

    The First Church of Christ, Scientist is located at 1366 S. Alvarado Street. It is currently the home of the Central Spanish Seventh-Day Adventist Church. In 1971, it was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 89).
  • First Baptist Church- Allison & Allison, Architects 1927
    Founded in 1884, the First Baptist Church of Los Angeles moved to its present location (the original church was located at 6th and Broadway) in 1927. The church is ornate by Baptist standards: the church's rose windows are adapted from the Chartres Cathedral; the coffered, gold-leaf ceiling is modeled after the chapel in the Ducal Palace in Montava, Italy. The 130-room edifice is dominated by the 155-foot Crowell Bell Tower, named after Weymouth Crowell, an imporant patron of the church.

    Many important Angelinos have played a part in the history of the church. Landowner Isaac Lankershim was a trustee of the original congregation as well as his son-in-law. hotel owner and developer Isaac Newton Van Nuys.

    The First Baptist Church of Los Angeles is located at 760 Westmoreland Avenue. It was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 237) in 1981.
  • First Baptist Church of Pasadena, Carlton Winslow, Sr. & Frederick Kennedy, Architects 1926
    Pasadena has some of the best church architecture in Southern California; a trip down Colorado Blvd. and its side streets is a visual reminder of the city's wealth, particularly in the boom of the Roaring 20's. The First Baptist Church with its fine Romanesque tower is a fine example.

    Winslow came to Southern California with strong credentials. After studying architecture at the Art Institute of Chicago and Paris' Ecole de Beaux Arts, he joined the firm Cram, Goodhue & Ferguson to work as supervising architect for the Panama-California Exposition in San Diego (1915).

    Winslow's work on the Exposition brought worldwide fame. In 1917 he moved to Los Angeles, remaining with Goodhue; the pair collaborated in the design of the Los Angeles Central Library. Other important commissions include the Community Presbyterian Church in Beverly Hills, St. Mary of the Angels in Los Angeles, and the Church of the Star of the Sea in La Jolla.

    First Baptist Church of Pasadena is located at 75 Marengo Avenue in the heart of the city's civic center.
  • First Baptist Church of Hollywood 1917-1936
    The Colonial Revival style First Baptist Church of Hollywood was originally founded in 1917. It was rebuilt after a fire destroyed much of the church in 1936. The immediate area for many years was known as the 'male hustler capital of Los Angeles'. Located at 6682 Selma Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90028
  • First African Methodist Episcopal Zion Cathedral- H.M. Patterson & George W. Kelham, Architects 1930
    Originally the West Adams Presbyterian Church, the cathedral is a fine example of the Romanesque Revival style. The property was purchased by the African Methodist Episcopal Zion denomination in 1972.

    The First African Methodist Episcopal Zion Cathedral is located at 1449 West Adams Blvd. in the West Adams district of Los Angeles. It was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1988 (No. 341).
  • First African Methodist Episcopal Church- Paul R. Williams, Architect 1968
    The third home of the First AME Church of Los Angeles founded by a former slave, Bridgett 'Biddy' Mason (1818-1891), following the example of Richard Allen (1760-1831), who founded the denomination after he and his followers were refused the right to worship in a church that they had helped to build. The sanctuary is dominated by a huge mural honoring the church's founders and other important figures in African-American history, including Frederick Douglass and Rev. Hiram Revels, the first black U.S. senator.

    The church is located in Sugar Hill, a well-to-do African-American neighborhood which has been home to Lena Horne, Dorothy Dandridge, Hattie McDaniel and Johnny Mathis. Paul R. Williams, the 'Architect of the Stars' and the first African-American to receive world-wide acclaim for his architectural designs, was appropriately selected to design the church.

    The First African Methodist Episcopal Church is located at 2270 S. Harvard Street.
  • Fire Engine House No. 18, John Parkinson, Architect 1904
    Architect John Parkinson, often referred to as the 'architect who built Los Angeles', completed this lovely Mission Revival style fire station in 1904; with its twin towers, it has the look of a small village church.

    Fire Station No. 18 is located at 2616 S. Hobart Blvd. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1988 (No. 349)
  • Fenyes House, Robert D. Farquhar, Architect 1906; Sylvanus Marston (addition) 1911
    One of the few remaining mansions on 'Millionaire's Row', the Fenyes House was designed by Robert D. Farquhar for Dr. Adalbert and Eva Fenyes in 1905 in the Beaux Arts style. Architect Sylvanus Marston designed a two-story addition to the house in 1911. During the Fenyes years, the home served as a gathering place for prominent artists, writers, musicians and scientists. From 1946 until 1970, the house served as the Finnish Consulate (Mrs. Fenyes' granddaughter was married to Finnish Consul George Paloheimo). In 1970, the Fenyes family donated the mansion complete with original furnishings, artwork, and numerous personal items to the Pasadena Museum of History, devoted to preserving the history of Pasadena .

    The house is a Pasadena Cultural landmark and is also listed in the National and California Registers of Historic Places. Located at 170 North Orange Grove Boulevard.
  • Fenton House, Leo F. Bachman, Architect 1938
    The Fenton House is a fine example of the Streamline Moderne style, designed by Leo F. Bachman for Leo Fenton in 1938. Note the glass block detailing on the left, the matching vertical windows, and the large circlular balcony atop the living room bay window on the right. Lush foliage partially hides the details.

    The Fenton House is located at 3527 Holboro Drive in Los Feliz.
  • Fatty Arbuckle House, Victor Sarteano, Builder c.1918
    Informed neighbors tell me that the great actor-comedian Roscoe Conkling 'Fatty' Arbuckle (1887-1933) lived in the house while working for the Selif Polyscope Company and later Keystone Studios. He was one of the most popular stars of the silent screen era and one of its best paid actors; in 1920 he signed a deal with Paramount Pictures that paid him $1M a year; unheard of for the time. It all came to a crashing end the following year, 1921, in which he was accused by a San Francisco madam of raping and killing bit player Virginia Rappe. Although he was eventually acquitted, his career took a dive and he only worked occasionally thereafter. He died in his sleep of a heart attack at age 46 in 1933.

    The house was originally built as a six room residence by Victor Sarteano in 1918. At some point in its evolution, it was enlarged and converted into an apartment house. Located at 1383 N. Lucile Avenue in what was originally called Childs Heights in the Silver Lake neighborhood of Los Angeles.

  • Farrell House, Lloyd Wright, Architect 1926
    The Farrell House demonsrates Wright's decorative skill in merging the Spanish Colonial Revival style with his signature textile blocks, left over from the construction of the Storer House (built in 1923, in West Hollywood). A wrought iron gate and central courtyard with fountain add to the drama. The house is located at 3209 Lowry Road in Los Feliz.

    For more information on the work of Lloyd Wright, the book 'Lloyd Wright: The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, Jr.' by Alan Weintraub makes for excellent reading.
  • Farmers & Merchants National Bank, Morgan & Walls Architects 1905
    The partnership of Octavius Morgan, John A. Walls and Stiles Oliver Clements designed some of Los Angeles most important commercial architecture of the early 20th century, including the Moderne style Pellissier Building (Wiltern Theater, HCM #118, 1930); the Renaissance Revival Giannini Building (Bank of Italy, now Bank of America, HCM#354, 1922); the Chapman Park Studio Building (HCM #280, 1929) and dozens more (the list is lengthy; other notable structures include the Mayan Theater, the Richfield Tower, El Capitan Theater, and the Citadel).

    Bank Founder Isais Hellman selected Octavius Morgan and John Walls for the design of the Italian Renaissance style structure; it was an important financial institution during the early days of Los Angeles.

    Located at 401 S. Main Street in downtown Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1983 (No. 271)
  • Ezra T. Stimson Residence, 839 West Adams Boulevard
    Designed by Architect Frederick Roehrig for Ezra Stimson in 1901, this imposing Tudor Revival home was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1989 (No. 456).
  • Eucalyptus Court, Balch Hall, Scripps College, Sumner Hunt & Silas R. Burns Architects 1929
    In Eucalyptus Court, the tree for which the court is named was full grown before the building was erected. When the actual construction of Balch Hall began, it was discovered that the position of the tree was not of the best in relation to the proportions of the flagstone court with its central fountain, and as a result the whole plan of construction was shifted to the south three to five feet to accommodate the tree. It is for this reason that the main entrance to Balch Hall is not centered in relation to Tenth Street, which it faces.

    On a March 22, 2011 visit to the campus, I did not see any Eucalyptus trees in the courtyard; a Spanish fountain, which appears in earlier photos, also is no longer there.
  • Ernest Wood House c.1891
    Queen Anne style Victorian residence named after Ernest Wood House, an early resident. Stories about Wood are contradictory; he may have been either a plumber, missionary or simply an early boarder. The house offers less gingerbread detail often associated with the style, reflecting the modesty favored by early Midwestern transplants.

    The Ernest Wood House is a designated Pasadena Historic Landmark (No. 503). Located at 1320 North Summit Avenue.
  • Eric Lloyd Wright House + Complex, Malibu, California
    I had the distinct pleasure of visiting architect Eric Lloyd Wright and his wife Mary at their monumental home in the hills of Malibu Canyon yesterday. The appointment was scheduled to give Eric a gift; a photograph I took of him with his son Devon while giving a lecture at the Anais Nin-Rupert Pole Residence in Silver Lake a few years ago (for the Silver Lake History Collective). I had given the portrait to Bob Herzog, Chairperson of the Collective, to give to Eric as a 'thank you' for the time spent together. I didn't think much about it, but after Bob Herzog passed away last November, I listed his house for sale earlier this year, and rummaging through his things left behind, discovered the photograph.

    I called Eric to tell him the story about the photograph, and much to my delight, he invited me out to the house for a visit. Situated on a remote, partially unpaved private road, the unfinished house is a masterpiece of contemporary design. While Eric is working on the house, he and his wife Mary live and work in make-shift housing; the office is an assortment of decks and living space superimposed on an expanded 'airstream' style trailer. The main house itself is nothing short of monumental. Situated on a bluff high above the Pacific Ocean, the house appears as something ancient with a contemporary twist, exactly as one would expect from a master of 'organic' architecture.

    The Eric Lloyd Wright house is located at 24680 Piuma Road in Malibu, California.
  • Ennis House, Frank Lloyd Wright, Architect, 1923-24
    The Ennis House is one of the most famous residences in the world, built by Frank Lloyd Wright for Mabel and Charles Ennis and completed in 1924. One of th first residences constructed from concrete block, The Ennis House is also one of the last Wright projects to employ stained glass, and one of the first to employ mitred glass windows. The Ennis House breaks Wright's principal of keeping the architecture on a human scale; the interiors have high, lofty ceilings and the whole very much has the feeling of great importance.

    The house is in serious decay, having sustained damage from severe winter storms as well as the Northridge Earthquake. The house is currently administered by the non-profit Trust for Preservation of Cultural Heritage.

    The Ennis House is located at 2655 Glendower Avenue in the Los Feliz District of Los Angeles. It is listed in the US. Department of the Interior National Register of Historic Places as well as a Cultural Heritage Monument by the City of Los Angeles.
  • Emily May Wilson Residence, Arthur R. Kelly 1921
    Prolific architect Architect Arthur R. Kelley designed the Mediterranean style villa for Emily May Wilson in 1921. The architect designed over 500 buildings over a 50-year career beginning in about 1902, the year he moved to Los Angeles from Iowa. After a brief stint in the office of Greene and Greene, he opened his own office. His best known commissions include Huntington Beach High School (1908); Christie Hotel (Hollywood); William S. Hart Ranch (Newhall); Arthur Letts Estate (Holmby Hills, now known as The Playboy Mansion); Harvard-Westlake School (Bel-Air) and the Wilshire Country Club in Hancock Park.

    The 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath house in 2870 sq. ft. is currently (October 2013) on the market listed for sale for $1,999,000 and described in the listing as ' Exceptional & rare 1921 Mediterranean 'Green' home in a convenient area less than a block from Griffith Park. This gated estate is sited on an expansive lot & has been renovated w/ impeccable style & an endless list of eco-friendly elements. The centerpiece is an open kitchen w/ Viking appliances, Caeserstone counters, subway tile back splash & center island, providing the ideal flow for entertaining. There are 3 well-proportioned beds & 2.5 baths, including a new master bath w/ mosaic tiles, a jetted tub & dual vanity, plus an incredible light-filled versatile sun room off the master. The living room has 3 French doors that open to a covered patio, leading to a lushly manicured & tranquil native landscaped yard w/ a gorgeous naturally designed pool & spa complimented by a stone water feature. The detached garage has been converted into a flexible space that opens to the pool, adding an additional 750 square feet of living area. Don't miss out on this one-of-a-kind opportunity.'

    The Wilson Residence is located at 1946 North Hobart Boulevard in the Los Feliz Village neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • Elvad House, Paul Kingsbury, Architect 1927
    The quintessential Spanish villa, The Elvad House was designed by Architect Paul Kingsbury for Danish immigrant Peter Elvad in 1927. Kingsbury (1893-1949) had an illustrious career. After graduation from the University of Pennsylvania School of Architecture (1916), he joined the firm of John T. Windrim in Philadelphia. When war broke out in Europe, he joined the effort in France (1918-19). Returning home, he found employment at the firm George B. Post & Sons (New York City 1919-1921), before moving to Los Angeles in 1921. After brief stints with William Lee Woolett (1921-1922) and Allison and Allison (1922-23), he formed a partnership with Architect Thomas P. Barber in 1924, together they designed the Gothic Revival McCarty Memorial Church in 1932. Kingsbury also designed the art deco La Marquise Apartments (LACHM # 853) and the Little Country Church of Hollywood (LACHM #567). Located at 3428 Amesbury Road in Los Feliz.
  • Elliott House, Glendale, CA 1915
    Built in 1915, just nine years after Glendale was incorporated into a city, the Elliott House incorporates fine Craftsman styling with an Asian flair, as noted in the roofline. The house is located at 1330 N. Louise Street. In 2002, the house received historical monument status, and was listed in the Glendale Register of Historic Places (No. 40).
  • Elliot House, Rudolph M. Schindler 1930
    Schindler kept busy during the Great Depression by accepting commissions with limited budgets, forcing him to take shortcuts and use less expensive materials. Although very little of the house can be seen from the street, we are able to make our assumptions of good design. In the Elliot House, Shindler began applying his skills at designing built-in furniture; the furniture frequently serving double-duty as room dividers.

    The Elliot House is located at 4237 Newdale Drive in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 690) in 2001.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • Elks Lodge No. 99, Curlett & Beelman, Architects 1923-24
    Built for the Benevolent & Protective Order of Elks (B.P.O.E.), this Neo-Gothic Shrine is notable for the massive sculptures adorning the corners of each wing and the upper central sections of the structure. The interiors, which were decorated by Anthony Heinsbergen must have made quite an impression on guests of the Elks Lodge during their heyday in the 20's, as they retain their grand opulence. The Grand Ballroom and Entrance Hall are especially noteworthy.

    Faced with a declining membership, the ELKS Building has been sold. It is designated as the 'Park Plaza Hotel', although it is currently used strictly as a rental for filming and events.

    Pictured is the Main Entrance to the Glendale Elks Building, located at 607 S. Park View Street in the MacArthur Park Area of Los Angeles. In 1983, the City of Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department recognized this important structure as an Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 267).
  • Elks Lodge No. 99, Curlett & Beelman, Architects 1923-24
    View of the Grand Ballroom.
  • Elks Lodge No. 99, Curlett & Beelman, Architects 1923-24
    The Entrance Hall & Staircase leading to the Grand Ballroom.
  • Elks Lodge No. 99, Curlett & Beelman, Architects 1923-24
    Detailed View of the Entrance Hall.
  • Elks Lodge No. 99, Curlett & Beelman, Architects 1923-24
    Detailed View of the Sculptures Adorning the Exterior.
  • Elia Jackson 'Lucky' Baldwin's Cottage, Arthur A. Bennett 1881
    Elias Jackson ('Lucky') Baldwin hired architect Arthur A. Bennett to design the Queen Anne 'cottage' on the Rancho Santa Anita, which he acquired in 1875. Baldwin was influenced in his choice of architectural style by the Queen Anne style British Pavilion at the 1876 Philadelphia Centennial Exhibition, and chose architect Bennett who was instrumental in the design of the California State Capital Building. The cottage served as the guest house on the ranch, while Baldwin lived in an old adobe house on the property. Baldwin died in 1909; the cottage was restored between 1951 and 1953. The cottage is on the grounds of the Los Angeles County Arboretum located in Arcadia, California.

    The Queen Anne Cottage is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

  • El Royale Apartments, William Douglas Lee, Architect c.1920
    An elegant address in the upscale Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles, the El Royale Aoartments were designed by architect William Douglas Lee in the 1920s. The historic building has French and Spanish Colonial Revival details; the front entrance is particularly imposing. Designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 309) in 1986. Located at 450 N. Rossmore Avenue.
  • El Rey Theater, W. Cliff Balch, Architect 1936
    El Rey Theatre is an art deco theater designed by Clifford A. Balch in 1936. The architect designed over twenty similar theatres in the Zigzag and Streamline Moderne design.
    From the 1980s to the early 1990s the theater operated as a dance-music club called Wall Street. Designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1991 (No. 520). Located at 5515 Wilshire Boulevard.
  • El Molino Viejo (The Old Mill) c.1816
    El Molino Viejo was originally built to serve as a grist mill for the Mission San Gabriel in about 1816. It is believed to be the oldest commercial building in Southern California still in existence. The walls on the lower level are composed of oven baked brick and volcanic tuff and are approximately 5 feet thick. The walls on the upper level are composed of sun-dried adobe. The wooden rafters, ceiling, and beams are made of local pine and sycamore; the roof is tiled. The whole surface of the building is covered with mortar made from lime derived from burnt sea shells, and additional strength is supplied by buttresses supporting three corners.

    El Molino Viejo is located at 1120 Old Mill Road in San Marino, California. The site is a California Historic Landmark (No. 302).
  • El Miradero- Nathaniel Dryden, Architect 1902-04
    Patterned after the East Indian Pavilion at the Columbian World Exposition held in Chicago in 1893, Glendale Industrialist Leslie E. Brand (who brought the Pacific Electric to Glendale in 1904) built his 'castle' in the Seracenic Style, combining Spanish, Moorish and Indian elements. A Victorian decor embellishes the interior.

    Mr. Brand died at the castle in 1925. He bequethed the property to the city on the condition that it be used exclusively for a public park and library. Today the Brand Castle and Library houses facilities for art exhibits, concerts and lectures and arts and crafts studios.

    El Miradero is located at 1601 West Mountain Street in Glendale, California.

  • El Mio, 5905 El Mio Drive, Highland Park
    Perched high above the street where Avenue 59 meets El Mio Drive, this imposing edifice was built for Los Angeles Superior Court Judge David P. Hatch in 1890. Declared a Historic-Cultural Monument by the Los Angeles Cultural Affairs Department in 1975 (No. 142).
  • El Bethel- Architect Unknown 1927
    Glendale's Rossmoyne neighborhood boasts many architecturally-significant residences, particularly in the foothills above Mountain Street. This 1927 Spanish Revival jewel was purchased in 2005 and has undergone an extensive renovation, restoring its original character and beauty.

    'El Bethel' is located at 1023 E. Mountain Street in Glendale. It is currently listed for sale for $1,589,000 (May 2007).
  • El Alisol- Charles Fletcher Lummis House (1898-1910) Sumner P. Hunt, Architect
    Charles Fletcher Lummis was one of the most important and colorful figures in Los Angeles during the turn of the twentieth century. In 1885 he left his home in Ohio and walked to Los Angeles, developing a life-long appreciation for the native cultures he encountered along the way, and for the striking beauty of the land. His reminiscences were carefully recorded, and sent to his friend General Harrison Gray Otis, which were published in his four-page newspaper, The Los Angeles Times. Later, Lummis became the first City Editor of the paper.

    The great stone house was built from boulders hauled up to the site from the nearby Arroyo Seco, mostly with Lummis' own hands and took twelve years to complete.

    Charles F. Lummis was also an author (His best known book was 'A Tramp Across the Continent'), historian, archeologist and Founder of the Southwest Museum.

    The Lummis Home is located at 200 East Avenue 43 in historic Highland Park. It was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1970. (No. 68).
  • Ehrbar House, Merl Lee Barker, Barker & Ott 1927
    Elegant French Normandy house originally designed by Merl Barker (1888-1970) of the architectural firm Barker & Ott. The firm also designed the Good Shepherd Catholic Church Beverly Hills 1930; the Immaculate Heart of Mary Church (Hollywood 1921); and the Spanish Gothic chapel at Mt. Saint Mary's College in Brentwood (1939). The house has kept its original 1927 charm including a fabulous Great Room with stenciled French Gothic ceiling, gleaming hardwood floors, wood-burning fireplace, wrought iron ceremonial gates and exquisite period light fixtures. All systems have been updated including central air and heat, new slate roof, remodeled kitchen and family room.

    The three bedroom, three bath house in 3,103 sq. ft. is currently (March 2013) available for lease for $4995.00 month.
  • Egyptian Theatre, Meyer & Holler 1922; Fung +Blatt, Restoration
    The Egyptian Theater was designed by Architects Meyer & Holler in 1932 for real estate developer Charles E. Toberman, the man most responsible for bringing first class motion picture theatres to Hollywood, including the El Capitan; and Grauman’s Chinese Theater as well as the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel which were all built in 1926.

    United Artists was the last owner of the Egyptian Theatre before closing in 1992. The American Cinematheque purchased the theatre from the City of Los Angeles for $1 with the provision that the historical landmark would be restored to its original grandeur. American Cinematheque is an independent, non-profit cultural organization in Los Angeles dedicated to the public presentation of the Moving Image in all its forms. It is considered among the premier organizations of its kind in America.

    The Egyptian Theatre is a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument dedicated in 1993 (No. 584). Located at 6706 Hollywood Boulevard.



  • Edward F. Spence House c.1906
    Edward F. Spence (1832 – 1892) served two terms as the 17th Mayor of Los Angeles, California, from December 9, 1884 to December 14, 1886. He also served as Vice-President of First National Bank. He began his political career in the California Legislature and before that was Treasurer in Nevada. Along with Monroe, John D. Bicknell, James F. Crank, and J.F. Falvey, gentlemen known to each other through business and society connections in Los Angeles, he purchased land in what is now Monrovia from Lucky Baldwin. Spence was a former mayor of Los Angeles, Bicknell a former judge, and Monroe had served on the Los Angeles City Council. Crank, like Baldwin, had been a railroad builder, but he lived in Pasadena, not Monrovia. Jeremiah F. Falvey had been the foreman of Baldwin's Rancho Santa Anita.

    Together these men decided to combine their lots under the business name of the Monrovia Land and Water Company. They understood that the completion of the Santa Fe and Southern Pacific railroads to California would bring in many new people looking for homes and investment opportunities, so buying up land for a new community seemed a good move. The combined lots Falvey, Spence, Bicknell, Monroe and Crank formed the Town of Monrovia Subdivision. Engineers John Quinton and John Flanagan plotted out sixty acres, with the center at Orange (now Colorado) and Myrtle Avenues.

    The Spence House is located at 270 N. Canyon Blvd. in Monrovia, CA.
  • Ed Moses Studio, Steven Ehrlich 1987
    As a part of the Los Angeles Conservancy's 'Venice Eclectic Tour: Modern Architecture from the '70s and '80s', we toured the studio of renowned artist Ed Moses on Saturday, April 21, 2013. The barn-like structure was a collaboration between artist and architect. According to the exhibit's brochure, the artist desired a minimalist approach, creating a simple workspace that would not compete with his abstract art. Located at 1233 Palms Boulevard in the Mar Vista neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Echo Park Lake
    The historic heart of Echo Park, the man-made Echo Park Lake served as a reservoir in the 1870s before it was converted into a public park in 1893. The picturesque park is surrounded by tall palm trees and features one of the largest lotus beds found anywhere in the world. The city's annual Pan-Asian Lotus Festival is held at the park every summer. The lake was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 2006. (No. 836).
  • Eastern Columbia Building, Claud Beelman, Architect 1930
    Considered Architect Claud Beelman's greatest work and one of Los Angeles' most beautiful historic buildings, the Zig-Zag Moderne style Eastern Columbia Building features a turquise-green facade of terra cotta tile, an ornate clock tower, and art deco lighting and fixtures, In 2006, the Eastern Columbia was converted into loft live/work spaces, considered one of the most desirable loft buildings in Downtown Los Angeles. Located at 849 S. Broadway in the Broadway Theater District.

    Other notable Beelman designs in Los Angeles include the Board of Trade Building, the Garfield Building, the Superior Oil Company Building (nowThe Standard Hotel), and the U.S. Post Office--Hollywood Station.
  • Earle C. Anthony House, Bernard Maybeck, Architect 1927
    The singular authenticated architectural project completed by the architect in Los Angeles, Maybeck is considered to be one of the great originals of American architecture. His father, an immigrant woodcarver, sent him to Paris to study furniture design, but he soon enrolled in the city's famed Ecole des Beaux-Arts to study architecture. By the time Maybeck enrolled in the school, the philosophy of the institution had been modified from pure classicism to a more rational approach, the goal of meeting contemporary living needs.

    Migrating to California in 1890, Maybeck flourished in the San Francisco bay area in the early part of the twentieth century. His public commissions brought him international fame. Among his most recognized works are the Palace of Fine Arts, built for the 1915 Panama-Pacific Exhibition in San Francisco, the Phoebe Hearst Memorial at UC Berkeley and the First Church of Christ, Scientist in Berkeley, California, considered by many to be his greatest achievement.

    The Anthony House, built for Earle C. Anthony in 1927 combines both Medieval, Gothic, Spanish and Tudor elements. The interior of the Nordic entrance tower was furnished as a replica of the prayer room of the Holy Father at the Vatican in Rome.

    Anthony was a prominent businessman, founder and owner of KFI-AM Radio and KECA-AM (Now KABC). He was active in many civic organizations, helping save the Hollywood Bowl as head of the 'Symphony Under the Stars' Foundation in the early '30's. The home was purchased in the early fifties by Sir Daniel Donohue and Countess Bernardine Murphy Donohue (Dan Murphy Foundation). Upon the death of the countess, the residence was bequethed to the Sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

    The house offers an urban sanctuary in the heart of the city, and is available to individuals or groups for a few hours or a day for reflection and prayer. A chapel, dining room and conference rooms are available.

    The Earle C. Anthony House is located at 3431-3441 Waverly Drive in Los Feliz.
  • Earle C. Anthony House, Bernard Maybeck, Architect 1927
    Donohue Manor, an integral part of the Gothic residence.
  • Eagle Rock Recreation Center, Richard & Dion Neutra, Architects 1953
    The Eagle Rock Recreation Center ranks as one of the Neutra firm's most innovative designs. Essentially a pavilion opening on three sides, the structure features 'roll-up' walls that provide great flexibility in space utilization. Much like double-hung windows, the walls rise up with about 8 feet of clearance providing a multitude of optional uses for the center.

    The Eagle Rock Recreation Center is located in the Eagle Rock neighborhood of Los Angeles, 1100 Eagle Vista Drive. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1991.
  • E.J.. Blacker House, Charles & Henry Greene 1912
    Not to be confused with the Asian-influenced Craftsman style Blacker House designed in 1907 on nearby Hillcrest Avenue, the E.J. Blacker House is more modest but nevertheless a lovely home from the Arts & Crafts Movement. Located at 675 S. Madison Avenue in the Oak Knoll neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • E.D. Goode House, Henry C. Banker, Builder c. 1892
    Recently 'discovering' this perfect little gem on a quiet street in Glendale gave me a real thrill; how could I have missed it? I must have driven by it a hundred times but somehow it never caught my attention until now. One of Glendale's few remaining examples of the Queen Anne/Eastlake architectural style, the house derives its name from an illustrious owner, Edgar D. Goode who was Road Commissioner for Los Angeles County. Goode occupied the home from 1897 until 1917, during which time he was involved in civic improvement projects that were instrumental in the early development of Glendale.

    The house was extensively renovated in 1995 and now serves as a privately-owned adult recreation center. In 1997 the house was registered in the Glendale Register of Historic Places (No. 8).

    The E.D. Goode House is located at 119 N. Cedar Street in Glendale, CA.
  • Dunsmuir Flats, Gregory Ain, Architect 1937
    Although designed in an economic, understated style, the staggered two story massing blocks have great appeal, typical of Architect Gregory Ain's body of work. Located at 1281 S. Dunsmuir Avenue.in Los Angeles, California.
  • Duncan-Irwin House, Charles & Henry Greene Architects 1900 & 1906

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    Originally a one-story cottage, the Irwins extended the house in 1906 into the grand Craftsman visible today. Situated on a corner of Arroyo Terrace and North Grand Avenue, the house is one of the most imposing in the Greene vocabulary.
  • Dumond House c.1925
    A rare example of the Storybook Style, which flourished in Los Angeles during the 1920's and 1930's, perhaps largely influenced by a proximity to Hollywood and the movies. The Hansel-and-Gretel 'set' is located at 270 Norumbega Drive in Monrovia, California.
  • Dumbacher House, Hagy Belzberg 1996








    A wildly original design by Architect Hagy Belzberg located at 1234 Linda Ridge Road, a remote-feeling, winding road in the foothills above Linda Vista Avenue. The isolated location adds to its great appeal, like an important piece of sculpture perfectly framed in its sylvan setting.
  • Dr. Milton Berry Residence, Lester G. Scherer 1938
    A Spanish Revival house designed by architect T. J. Sooth in 1927 originally stood on the site. In 1938 Dr. Milton Berry engaged Architect Lester Scherer to redesign the house with a Colonial Revival facade. Architect Scherer designed many notable Los Angeles landmarks during his career, including the Todd Johnston House in Holmby HIlls, the Mediterranean style Meade House 'La Casa de las Campanas' in Hancock Park, and Our Lady of Lourdes Roman Catholic Church in Boyle Heights. He also designed an Art Deco style residence for pioneer building merchant Perry Whiting in Laughlin Park in 1930.

    Located at 2350 N. Vermont Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Dr. George E. Judd Residence, Arthur W. Hawes, Architect 1938
    Colonial Revival style designed for Dr. George E. Judd, by Architect Arthur W. Hawes in 1938. Located at 4621 Gainsborough Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Welton Becket, Architect 1961
    The Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, designed by Welton Becket c.1961, is one of the largest performance venues in the United States with 3200 seats. it is over a third larger than the Gershwin Theatre in New York, which is Broadway's largest at 1900 seats. The Chandler Pavilion is the home of the Los Angeles Opera and Dance at the Music Center, which includes the American Ballet Theatre, Complexions Contemporary Ballet, David Michalek's Slow Dancing, Mark Morris Dance Group and Teatro alla Scala Ballet Company.
  • Dorland House, Lloyd Wright 1950

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    Architect Frank Lloyd Wright designed the two-bedroom, one-bath home in 1465 sq. ft. in 1950. The house is currently (September 2013) on the market listed for sale for $850,000 and described in the listing, ' Lloyd Wright had a vision to design an affordable quality home with characteristic elements of his father's Usonian homes and the Dorland home was created! Mr. Dorland said it best in a letter to Lloyd when he wrote, It isn't like living, it's like being on vacation.'' This sense of serenity was achieved as Lloyd created this home to blend seamlessly with it's natural surroundings. The awe inspiring living room features complimentary stains on large sections of wood panels to create a one-of-a-kind diamond pattern backdrop for the beamed ceilings. Walls of glass and rose colored block walls rise up from polished concrete floors to meet the ceilings. Walls of glass doors collapse into each other, creating a seamless transition into the thoughtfully planned Sylvan yard. Lloyd pulled the rose colored block and diamond pattern elements from the house and used them throughout the landscape design of the pool and patios completing his vision'.

    Located at 1370 Morada Drive in the foothills of Altadena, an unincorporated neighborhood of Los Angeles, California.
  • Donovan House, Theodore Eisen c.1910 & Frank Meline 1920








    Classic Greek Revival Style designed by Theodore Eisen, Walker & Eisen Architects for Mrs. Jeanette Donovan in 1910. Documents show that Architect Frank Meline added servants quarters, a garage and other alterations in 1920. The house is popularliy known as the 'Sunshine House'; it was once the West Coast home of Reverend Dr. Harwood Huntington, an Episcopalian Minister from New Haven, Connecticut. His wife, Grace Beecher Goodhue Huntington, was the daughter of Charles Leonard Goodhue, of the Pullman Train Car Company.

    Located at 419 S. Lorraine Blvd. in the Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. Alternatively referred to as the 'Evans Residence' Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1973 (No. 115) and ''Davidson-Evans House' (Windsor Square-Hancock Park Landmark No. 27).
  • Don LaFontaine House, Fremer/Savel Architects 1994

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    The LaFontaine House, viewed from Farmouth Drive.
  • Don LaFontaine House, Fremer/Savel Architects 1994

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    Voiceover Artist Don LaFontaine (1940-2008) gained fame as 'Thunder Throat' and 'The Voice of God' in more than 5,000 film trailers and thousands of television commercials in a career spanning over 40 years. LaFontaine selected the Santa Monica-based firm Fremer/Savel Architects for the design of his home in Los Feliz (the round tower is reminiscent of the Valley Plaza Branch Library in North Hollywood, also designed by the firm).


    The LaFontaine House is located at 3800 Amesbury Road.

  • Doheny Memorial Library, USC, Cram & Ferguson Architects, 1932
    A gift of oil baron Edward L. Doheny, Jr., the library contains the largest collection of books on the main campus of the University of Southern California. Dedicated on September 12, 1932, the building was designed to compliment the Romanesque buildings recently completed on the campus. The architect, Ralph Adams Cram, worked extensively from designs that he and Bertram Goodhue used successfully on buildings constructed at Rice University in 1910.

    The Doheny Library has the most lavishly decorated interiors of any building at the university. Especially noteworthy is the Entrance Hall with elegant stained glass windows.
  • Doheny Mansion, Theodore Augustus Elsen & Sumner P. Hunt, Architects, 1898
    The home of oil baron Edward L. and Carrie Estelle Doheny for almost sixty years, the Doheny Mansion is built in the Gothic Renaissance Victorian Style, and is easily one of the grandest and best preserved in the city. Located on the grounds of Mt. St. Mary's College in the West Adams District, the home boasts a marble-pillared Great Hall, the Pompeian Room with an iridescent Tiffany glass dome, imported Siena marble columns and a bronzed gold-leaf frieze. Declared an Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles in 1965 (No. 30).
  • Dogtown Station, Landau Partners Architects 2008
    Dogtown Station is a steel and concrete townhouse and loft development composed of three and two story lofts and townhouses, each with mezzanine and roof deck. The development is strategically located between eclectic and funky Venice and trendy Main Street Santa Monica at 700 Main Street, Venice, CA 90291
  • Doctors' House- c. 1887-1895
    Named for three prominent physicians and a chemist who made their home here, the 'Doctors' House' is one of the few remaining homes in Glendale from the Victorian era. Originally located at the northwest corner of Wilson and Belmont, the house was slated for demolition in 1979, when a successful rescue effort was initiated by Glendale City Councilmember John F. Day and the Glendale Historical Society. In 1980, the house was moved to its present location in Brand Park where it has undergone extensive restoration.

    Designed in the Queen Anne and Eastlake Victorian Style, the house was listed in the Glendale Register of Historic Places in 1977 (No. 6).
  • Disney Hall, Frank Gehry Architect 2003
    Disney Concert Hall was designed by architect Frank Gehry in the shape of a ships' hull, with 2,265 audience seats which surround the orchestra and provide one of the most acoustically perfect concert halls in the world. The complex encompasses two outdoor amphitheaters, including the William M. Keck Children's Amphitheatre and the Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater (REDCAT), operated and programmed by California Institute of the Arts. Located at 135 Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Directors' Guild of America, Rochlin Baran + Balbona Architects 1988
    The Directors Guild of America building serves as the center of creativity for the guild's 8,600 film and television directors. The building's cylindrical form presents ''an advanced and timeless architectural statement', according to Ephraim Baran, principal of t;he firm Rochlin Baran + Balbona Architects. The play of light on a simple cylinder sheared in half provides the dynamic concept. The large circumference of the cylinder also works well for office planning,' Purcell said.

    The firm's director of design, Philo Jacobson, who was largely responsible for creating the DGA headquarters design, describes the building as 'expressing the intent of the Directors Guild to represent the wonder and timeless beauty of film, motion and thought, simultaneously frozen, to be released in time and light.

    'The form imparts a kinetic quality to the structure, creating the illusion of motion. By viewing the building at various angles, the shape constantly changes from a complete cylinder, separating and moving apart, then merging back into a cylinder,' Jacobson said.

    The facade of the 110,000-square-foot, six-story building rises from a polished carnelian-colored granite base, incrementally changing to a complete copper-bronze glass skin at the top. The structure's vertically notched areas are clad in blue-green reflective glass, repeated in the rectilinear horizontal segments at the building's entry. Located at 7920 Sunset Blvd. in West Hollywood, California.
  • Derby House, Lloyd Wright, Architect, 1926
    Although his father, Frank Lloyd Wright, Sr. is more famous for the use of concrete 'textile' blocks in his residential construction projects (see Ennis House, in Los Feliz, Storer & Freeman Houses in Hollywood) it was Lloyd Wright who maintained throughout his career that they were actually his invention. Other examples of Lloyd Wright houses that employ textile block construction include the Farrell House at 3209 Lowry Road and the Sowden House at 5121 Franklin Avenue, both in Los Feliz.

    The Derby House is located 2535 Chevy Chase Drive in Glendale.
  • Dennis Hopper House, Brian Murphy 1989
    Actor Dennis Hopper commissioned Brian A. Murphy, the 'bad boy of architecture' to design for him a funky bachelor's pad immediately next door to the postmodern Arnoldi Complex. The plain, corrugated metal facade contradicts a spacious, light-filled interior.

    Located at 330 Indiana Avenue in Venice Beach, California.
  • De Keysor Dupex, Rudolph M .Schindler 1932
    I had to use my telephoto lens to get the photograph. The house is located on a steep hillside above Highland Avenue. To get there, you first of all have to get through a gate at the bottom of the staircase, which was locked. The house has no garage, no driveway, and no street parking. The duplex has a two bedroom/one bathroom upper unit and a one bedroom/one bathroom lower unit. The house last sold in October 2011 for just under $1.2M complete with an adjacent .08 acre lot.

    The De Keysor Duplex is located at 1911 Highland Avenue in Hollywood, California.
  • De Garmo House, Kemper Nomland Sr., Architect 1929
    The house was designed for Ellwood De Garmo, a Director of the Los Feliz Improvement Association by Kemper Nomland in 1929. The architect studied architecture at Columbia University before practicing in New York, Seattle, and then Los Angeles. He worked with Albert C. Martin in 1922, Marston Van Pelt & Maybury (1923–1925) Austin, Martin & Parkinson (1926–1927); Kemper Nomland Jr. after 1928; and Hunt & Chambers from 1942-1944. Together with his son Kemper Nomland Jr. they designed one of the Case Study Houses in 1947 at 711 San Rafael Avenue in Pasadena.

    Located at 3855 Carnavon Way in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Curtin House, Sylvanus Marston, Architect 1915
    The home of railroad attorney Thomas E. Curtin, his wife Leonora and their daughter Leonora “Babsie” Curtin. An influenza epidemic took Mr. Curtin’s life in 1911, and Leonora and Babsie left to live in the next-door Fenyes Mansion with Leonora’s mother Mrs. Fenyes. in 1915 she had an adjacent house built just for Leonora and Babsie. Leonora never remarried and oft referred to herself as Mrs. T. E. Curtin even decades later. The residence was designed in the French-style by Sylvanus Marston in 1915, now a part of the Pasadena Historical Society.. Located at 160 N. Grand Avenue.
  • Cummings Estate c.1905
    The home of Wilbur Cummings, the oldest estate in Los Feliz, the Cummings Estate completed in 1905. Cummings was a Los Angeles businessman and real estate tycoon. He was the proprietor of Cummings Shoe Store, which was located at 110 South Spring Street. He died in 1937 and is buried at Hollywood Forever Cemetary. His wife Minnie lived until 1957.

    The 5 bedroom, 3.5 bath house in 4037 sq. ft. is currently (September 2013) on the market listed for sale for $3.3M and described in the listing as 'Located deep within gated Laughlin Park, this historic estate has it all: security; celebrity-seclusion; 360-degree views; mature grounds; sunny exposure; extraordinary original fixtures and finishes throughout; grand scale; provenance and expansion potential. The celebrated enclave of Laughlin Park all began here'.

    Located at 2020 Cummings Lane in the gated Laughlin Park community within the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Culver Hotel, Curlett & Beelman, Architects 1924
    The Culver Hotel was designed by Curlett and Beelman the distinguished architectural firm already made famous for the designs of the Park Plaza Hotel, Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel and Union Oil Company. When the hotel opened in 1924, the local newspaper headline read, ' City Packed with Visitors for Opening of Culver Skyscraper.' The six-story hotel was a monument to the city's founding father Harry Culver, who maintained an office on the second floor. (Beelman also designed the Eastern Columbia Building and the Thalberg Administration Building at Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (1938).

    The Renaissance Revival style hotel was the tallest structure between the 'pueblo' of Los Angeles and Venice.Beach when it was completed. The film has been featured in many films, including Laurel and Hardy shorts. It has been the home of numerous movie stars including Red Skelton, Clark Gable, Joan Crawford, Greta Garbo, and Ronald Reagan and the 'Munchkins' of Wizard of Oz fame. The hotel was once owned by John Wayne, who eventually donated it to the Los Angeles YMCA. The hotel was restored in the 1990s, the rooms renovated with individual baths and furnished with antiques. The halls are hung with nostalgic scenes from the movies. The Hotel is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Located at 9400 Culver Boulevard in Culver City, California.


  • Culver City Hall, Heery International Architects 1991
    The original Culver City City Hall built in 1928 was demolished in the early 1990s to make way for a new Civic Center. The new three story, 90,00 square foot structure pays tribute to the city's past, combining art deco, Spanish-Mediterranean and Wrightian architectural details into an imposing statement. The 2 1/2 acre outdoor plaza ncompasses extensive landscaping, public art and water accents. ,Heery (as the JCM Group) provided a full range of project and construction management services for the project. Located at 9770 Culver Boulevard
  • Culbertson House, Charles & Henry Greene 1911
    Designed by Charles and Henry Greene in 1911 for Cordelia, Kate, and Margaret Culbertson, three unmarried sisters with money to spend and very specific ideas on what they wanted in a house. The house is one of the Greene Brothers’ most interesting designs, with a green tile roof and fireplace of Numibian marble. The sisters wanted all the rooms on one level but objected to ground-floor bedrooms. The Greenes solved this by designing a U-shaped residence wrapped around a central courtyard with the bedroom wing on the brink of a small canyon overlooking a wooded slope in back, thus achieving the look and feel of a second floor.

    Located at 1188 Hillcrest Avenue in the Oak Knoll neighborhood of Pasadena.
  • Crow-Crocker House, Henry Greene, Greene & Greene Architects 1909
    Architect Henry Greene, partner in the famous architectural firm Greene & Greene, designed the Craftsman style house on his own in 1909. The house is a designated Pasadena Historic Landmark. Located at 979 S. El Molino Avenue in the Oak Knoll neighborhood of Pasadena.
  • Crossroads of the World, Robert V. Derrah, Architect 1936
    Resembling an ocean liner docked in a narrow harbor, Crossroads of the World is regarded as one of the west's earliest shopping malls. The central 'ship' is surrounded by small shops resembling a European village. It has been used as a location in many films, including L.A. Confidential and The Adventures of Ford Fairlane. Derragh also contributed the Coca Cola Bottlng Company, another 'marooned ship' located south of downtown Los Angeles.

    Crossroads of the World is located at 6671 Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood. Declard a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1974. (No. 134).
  • Crestwood Apartments, W. Douglas Lee 1930
    The Art Deco style Crestwood Apartments were designed by architect W. Douglas Lee in 1930. The architect also designed the El Royale Apartments in 1920 (designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 309) in 1986). Located at 1036 Menlo Avenue in the Pico Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, California.
  • Craig Ehrlich Residence, John Friedman, Alice Kimm Architects 2004
    The streets south of San Vicente and north of Montana Avenue ringing the palisades of Santa Monica consist mainly of Spanish and Mediterranean Revival estates. Sprinkled in is the occasional and surprising modernist beauty that really makes a statement. Los Angeles based architects John Friedman and Alice Kimm designed the Ehrich Residence for an 'entrepreneur seeking refuge from a nomadic life.'

    According to the architects' website, 'The internal masses of the house have been distributed to create a “diagonal void” that brings light and air deep into the house beginning with a large, south-facing clerestory on the second floor; a stair atrium collects and vents hot air through motorized skylights in the roof. The unexpected void intensifies the abstract spatial qualities that are at the heart of the home’s aesthetic. The structure’s siting and openness allow sunlight and breezes to naturally warm and cool the house, as well as to encourage the type of indoor-outdoor living made possible by Southern California’s temperate environment. (The house has no mechanical air conditioning system.) The koi pond cools the air before it enters the house. The concrete floors absorb heat during the day and release it at night.'

    The house has been the subject of several university lectures and is on the cover of Santa Monica’s influential “Residential Green Building Guide.” Located at the corner of Gale Place and San Vicente Boulevard.
  • Cotten-Elliott House, Michael Tolleson, Architect 1991
    Emeryville-based architect Michael Tolleson designed the De Stijl-inspired house for Roy D. Cotten and Claudia Elliott in 1991. The abstract design attains an aesthetic balance using projecting and receding boxes enveloped in monochromatic grey. The house, perched on a hillside above Griffith Park Boulevard in the Franklin Hills of Los Angeles, California, can be seen from a great distance. Located at 2216 Ronda Vista Drive.
  • Cosby House, Merithew & Ferris, Architects, 1893
    The City of Pasadena has some of the very best architecture to be found anywhere in the world. From elegant old Victorians to the most avante garde post-modern designs, Pasadena has it all!
    This elegant Queen Anne Victorian was built in 1893. It was originally located near the campus of the University of Southern California in West Adams at 626 W. 30th Street. It was moved to this leafy neighborhood in the beautiful Arroyo Seco section of Pasadena at 510 Lockhaven Street. The La Strada Inn originally stood at this site.
  • Corona di Collini, W.C. Tanner, Architect, 1926
    The Corona di Collini Estate of child actress Jane Withers. Withers purchased the home in 1969, a year after the death of her husband, singer Ken Errair (Four Freshmen). The home was built for Josiah Lee Dabbs, a prominent member of the Democratic Party in 1926 by distinguished architect W.C. Tanner. In 1992, the home was purchased by actress Geena Davis.

    Situated on a hillside lot of over 19,000 sq. feet, the villa contains 13,000 sq. feet of living space with four master suites and 7.5 baths. The Spanish Churrigueresque style entrance is noteworthy. It is currently (February 2006) the highest listed price house that has ever come on the market in Los Feliz at $8,950,000.
  • Constance Perkins House, Richard Neutra 1955
    Neutra designed the house for Perkins a professor at nearby Occidental College, a 'tart, opinionated intellectual art historian' according to Neutra biographer Barbara Lamprecht. She was an intimate friend of the Neutras; a world traveler wanting a home that she would be 'homesick for', and was deeply involved in the design. Affectionately dubbed 'Professor Perkins of Poppy Peak', she would often host student gatherings at the house. Located at 1540 Poppy Peak Drive in Pasadena, California.

















  • Colorado Street Bridge, Waddell & Harrington, Architects 1913
    The Colorado Street Bridge is a historic concrete arch bridge spanning the Arroyo Seco designed by the firm J.A.L. Waddell. The bridge connects Pasadena with Eagle Rock and Glendale and the rest of Los Angeles westside. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has been designated a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

    For years, the bridge was known locally as the 'Suicide Bridge' because of the many suicides commited on it. A suicide barrier was added which reduced the number of suicides, but the bridge retained its nickname. In 1989, after the Loma Prieta earthquake in Northern California, the bridge was declared a seismic hazard and closed to traffic. It was reopened in 1993 after a substantial retrofit. The bridge is closed each summer for the 'Celebration on the Colorado Street Bridge', hosted by the historic preservation group, Pasadena Heritage.
  • Collins Residence, 890-892 West Kensington Road
    Michael Collins was credited with bringing the Santa Fe Railroad to the City of Los Angeles. He is the first owner of record of this magnificent Eastlake Victorian built in circa 1888. The building originally stood on Whittier Boulevard, but was moved to its present location in 1987. It was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in 1983 (No. 266).
  • Collins House, Paul R. Williams Architect 1932
    Architect Paul R. Williams designed the French Normandy style house for William Collins in 1932 during the height of the Great Depression. According to Williams' biographer, Karen E. Hudson, 'skilled artisans who carved the staircase and other details of the house were often unemployed craftspeople who would receive only one day's wages for two days of work'.

    Located at 601 South Lorraine Boulevard in the exclusive Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Collins House, Jackie Collins Design c..1991
    The modern house was designed in 1991 by English-born novelist Jacqueline Jill Collins, the younger sister of actress Joan Collins. The author has written 29 novels to date, all of which have appeared on the New York Times Bestseller List and sold more than 500 million copies, eight of which have been adapted for the screen. Sh was born in London in 1937, the younger daughter of Joseph William Collins, a theatrical agent whose clients included Shirley Bassey, The Beatles and Tom Jones. Expelled from school at the age of 15, she reportedly threw her school uniform into the River Thames and had a brief affair with Marlon Brando (who was 29 at about the same time).

    Her first novel, The World Is Full of Married Men, was published in 1968 was banned in Australia and South Africa and labeled by the press as 'nasty, filthy and disgusting', which bolstered sales. Others followed, typically lurid stories involving scandal and adultery. In the 1980s, she moved permanently to Los Angeles and published the novel Chances, which introduced her character, Lucky Santangelo, the 'dangerously beautiful' daughter of gangster Gino Santangelo.

    Her most successful novel Hollywood Wives, followed in 1983, hitting the New York Times bestseller list at number one, and went on to sell fifteen million copies worldwide. The novel was a 'scandalous exposé', and was later made into a television mini-series, starring Candice Bergen, Stefanie Powers, Angie Dickinson, Anthony Hopkins, Suzanne Somers and Rod Steiger. She then went on to write the sequel to Chances entitled Lucky (published in 1985), followed by Hollywood Husbands (1986), and Rock Star (1988). In 2011 Collins was listed as the UK's fifth richest author with an estimated personal fortune of £60 million ($96 million).

    The six bedroom, ten bath house in 18,577 sq. ft. Collins designed for herself is located in Beverly Hills, California at 616 North Beverly Drive.

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  • Colburn School of Performing Arts, Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer Associates 1998








    Designed by the same firm that designed the expansion of the Riordan Central Library and the new addition to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The building has a zinc roof, red brick walls; the builder also used Plexiglass and wood. Inside, there is a studio designed in 1946 by Lloyd Wright for violinist Jascha Heifetz. Located at 200 S. Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Col. John E. Stearns Residence, John Parkinson, Architect 1900
    Classic Greek Revival style house designed for Col. John E. Stearns in 1900. John Parkinson, the architect arrived in Los Angeles in 1894, opening his architectural office on Spring Street. By 1896, he had designed the city's first Class 'A' fireproof steel-frame structure: the Homer Laughlin Building. The Stearns Residence followed in 1900. His design for the 1904 Braly Block at Fourth Street and Spring became the first 'skyscraper' built in Los Angeles. It held the distinction of being the tallest structure in town until the completion of City Hall in 1928.

    Located at 27 St. James Park in the West Adams neighborhood of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1989. (No. 434)
  • Coffin Residence c.1903
    Mission Revival style residence, with a nod to the California missions established in the late 1700s. An unusual, Moorish-influenced cupola tower is the dominating feature. The American Society of Cinematographers has occupied the building since the 1930s.

    Located at 1782 N. Orange Drive in Hollywood, California.
  • Cockins House, Bradbeer & Ferris, Architects, 1894

    The Historic West Adams District has some of the best preserved Victorian residences remaining in Los Angeles. During the late 19th and early 20th century, the area was one of the most prestigious in the city. The Cockins House, located at 2653 South Hoover Street is a fine example of the Queen Anne Style.

    Declared an Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles in 1991 (No. 519), the residence is occupied by the University of Southern California Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy.
  • Coca-Cola Building, Robert V. Derrah, Architect 1939
    Important example of the Streamline Moderne Style designed in 1939 by Robert V. Derrah. Resembling in style a huge ocean liner, the building is replete with portholes, cargo doors, catwalk and topped with a bridge.

    The Coca-Cola Building is located at 1334 South Central Avenue. It was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1975 (No.138).
  • Cloud House, James R. Meyer (LEAN ARCH), Architects
    The AIA/Los Feliz Home Tour of 2008 provided the opportunity to visit this recent addition to the architectural heritage of Los Feliz. Architectural Photographer Martin Schall (you-are-here.com) accompanied me on the tour. The new residence is entered through a bridge to the main entrance and cantilivered living room. Telescoping steel decks extend beyond the building face, providing additional vantage points from which to enjoy the panoramic view below. The machine-like steel structure is clad with anodized aluminum and stucco panels. Walls of glass on the north and south elevations visually connect the interior with the surrounding natural landscape, highlighting the 'Hollywood' sign situated across the canyon. A deep blue pool and cantilivered pool house dramatically complete the picture.

    The CLOUD HOUSE is located at 2511 Wild Oak Drive in the prestigious Los Feliz Oaks community.
  • Cloud House, James R. Meyer (LEAN ARCH) Architects 2004
    The pool house, delicately suspended in space, brings to mind the iconic image by Photographer Julius Shulman of Pierre Koenig's dreamy 'Case Study House No. 22'.
  • Clifford E. Clinton Residence, Arthur W. Larson, Architect 1928
    The original owner, W. Lloyd Lauman, lost the house to foreclosure at the onset of the Great Depression. In 1935, Clifford and Nelda Clinton became the first residents. Clinton was a descendent of New York Governor DeWitt Clinton. His parents were captains in the Salvation Army. After serving as a missionary to China, he returned to Los Angeles to enter the restaurant business with his father. With $2,00 in capital, he opened his first cafeteria, Clifton's Cafeteria, the oldest surviving cafeteria style eatery in Los Angeles, California, and the largest public cafeteria in the world. Located at 5470 Los Feliz Blvd. in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.

    Founded in 1931, the name of the cafeteria was created by combining the first half of 'Clifford' and the last half of 'Clinton' to produce the name 'Clifton's'. The cafeteria soon grew into a chain, noted for never turning anyone away hungry or could not afford to pay. In 1946, the Clintons sold their cafeteria interests to their three younger children, retiring to devote their energies to 'Meals for Millions', a non-profit founded for the purpose of distributing food to millions of starving and malnourished people throughout the world after World War II.
  • Clearman's Northwoods Inn, Robert Frank Duff
    The distinctive Clearman's Northwoods Inn restaurant was designed by Architect Robert Frank Duff. The architect also designed the San Gabriel Bowling Alley as well as a post and beam house for Martin & Jessie Reade in Mt. Washington in 1968.

    Clearnan's Northwoods Inn is located at 7242 Rosemead Boulevard in San Gabriel, California.
  • CLA Building, Antoine Predock 1993
    See it before it's no more! The California State University trustees have approved a plan to replace the CLA (short for Classroom/Lab/Administration) Building on the campus of California State Polytechnic University, Pomona (Cal Poly Pomona). The building sits atop the San Jose Hills (earthquake) fault and has a very high seismic risk score, nor does it meet earthquake safety standards. The futuristic style building was designed by Albuquerque-based architect Antoine Predock in 1993. The structure can easily be seen for miles around. It seems a great shame to lose it inasmuch as it has become the 'defining image' of the university.

    Located at 3801 W. Temple Ave. Pomona, CA 91768.


  • Cinerama Dome, Welton Becket and Associates 1963
    Welton Becket and Associates Architects designed the first geodesic dome theater based on a design by architect R. Buckminster Fuller. It was the first major motion picture theater in Hollywood in 33 years. Declared a Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument (No. 659). Located at 6360 Sunset Boulevard.
  • Churchill House, F. Pierpont Davis, Architect 1909








    Designed by Architect F. Pierpont Davis in a subdued Craftsman style for Thomas A. Churchill Sr. in 1909.; the house is more interesting when viewed from the side, as seen here.. Designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1992. (No. 568). Located at 215 S. Wilton Place in the Windsor Square neighborhood of Los Angeles.

  • Church of the Recessional, Forest Lawn (Glendale), Paul O. Davis, Architect, 1941
    The largest of the three English village churches located at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, California. The Church of the Recessional is a reproduction of the Parish Church of St. Margaret, Village of Rottingdean in Sussex, England. The original church was erected c. 940 A.D.
  • Church of the Precious Blood, Henry Carlton Newton & Dennis Murray, Architects 1926

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    The architectural firm Truesdell and Murray were originally selected to design the Italian Romanesque style church in 1924; however architects Henry Carlton Newton and Robert Dennis Murray took over the project which was completed in 1926. The church is constructed in reinforced concrete and cast stone. The imposing entrance portal is the work of Salvatore Cartiano Scarpitta, best known for his work on Los Angeles’ City Hall.

    The Church of the Precious Blood is located at 435 S. Occidental Blvd. in the Mid-Wilshire neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Church of the Good Shepherd, J.J. Donnellan 1925
    The Mission Revival style Church of the Good Shepherd was designed by architect J. J. Donnellan and dedicated on February 1, 1925. With foresight, Bishop John J. Cantwell instructed Fr. Michael Mullins, the parish pastor, to form a Catholic Motion Picture Guild, to serve the spiritual needs of a growing colony of film executives and movie stars. The church was renovated in 1959, with the addition of a new marble main altar and two side altars. Sealed in each altar were the relics of Ss. Felicitas and Perpetua, and St. Vibiana, patroness of the Los Angeles Archdiocese.

    Located at 505 North Bedford Drive in Beverly Hills, California.
  • Church of the Flowers, Forest Lawn (Glendale)
    One of three reproductions of English village churches located at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Glendale, The Church of the Flowers is a reproduction by A. Patterson Ross of a church found in Stoke Poges.
  • Church of the Epiphany, Ernest Coxhead (1889); Arthur B. Benton 1913








    The original chapel (barely visible on the left side, with a single gable)) was designed by Ernest Coxhead in 1888-89. The much larger addition was designed by Architect Arthur R. Benton in 1913. The stained glass Epiphany window over the main altar was designed by Tiffany; the other stained glass windows, include the Good Shepherd Window at the rear of the sanctuary were designed by Judson Studios.

    The church played an important role in the struggle for Latino rights in the 1960's and 70's. Under the leadership of Fathers John Luce and Roger Wood, the church served as the home of 'La Raza', the Chicano newspaper. The Chicano Moratorium was planned here, and the Brown Berets met at the church to plan their political activities. In 2005, the church was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.

    The church is located at 2808 Altura Street in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Church of the Epiphany, Arthur B. Benton 1913








    The main sanctuary (as seen from the chancel) of the expanded church, designed by Architect Arthur B. Benton in 1913. The stained glass window seen here of the Good Shepherd was designed by nearby Judson Studios. Located at 2808 Altur Street in Lincoln Heights.
  • Church of the Angels, 1100 Avenue 64
    The Church of the Angels in Pasadena is one of the most historic and beautiful churches in the western United States. The Anglican church was built by Mrs. Alexander Robert Campbell-Johnston as a memorial to her husband and as a place of worship for the people of the village of Garvanza.

    Built in 1889, it served the Bishop of Los Angeles as his pro-cathedral until St. Paul's Church was constituted; it was then designated the Bishop's Chapel. Since then, the Bishop has served as rector with his chaplain appointed vicar in charge of all services.

    The church is patterned after Holmbury St. Mary's Church, near Droking, Surrey, England, although it is not an exact copy. It is set in a garden of three acres and is faced with sandstone that was hauled from quarries in the San Fernando Valley. The San Rafael Ranch, of which Garvanza was a part, supplied the red stone which has been incorporated into the structure. The stone tower (once 44 foot) is characteristic of the eleventh century and houses an eight- day Seth Thomas clock (which denoted the hours by striking a bell suspended in the belfry). The bellfry was damaged during the 1973 earthquake and during repairs the steeple had to be lowered a few feet.

    The interior walls of the church are of red pressed brick, and the ceiling is of redwood, both of which have mellowed through the years giving a soft warm feeling. Near the main entrance the baptistry is located, in which stands a font of Mexican alabaster with a figure, carved from Italian marble, of a child angel. The font was a gift from the workmen engaged in the building of the church.

    The magnificent memorial window was designed and executed in London and has been said to be one of the finest examples of stained glass in America.

    The altar and chancel furniture are veneered with olive wood donated by the Franciscan Fathers from the grounds of the Mission San Gabriel. The Lectern, exquisitely carved in the form of St. Michael, was designed by the eminent English sculptor W. R. Ingraham and executed in a carving school in Belgium. The body is made of one solid piece carved from a 400 year-old oak tree. The pulpit has been carved from English oak with a white Portland stone base. It was erected at the 40th anniversary of the opening of the church.

    The pipe organ, housed in the north transcept, was built and installed in 1889.
  • Church of Our Savior Episcopal Church c.1872 (and later)
    The historic Episcopal Church of Our Saviour was established in 1867 as the first Protestant church in the San Gabriel Valley. Noted for its beautiful English Gothic sanctuary and its magnificent stained glass windows designed by Judson Studios.

    Located at 535 W. Roses Road in San Gabriel, California.
  • Christuskirche, Fields Devereaux Architects 1998
    The oldest German speaking congregation in the southwestern United States beginning in the mid-nineteenth century, the First German United Methodist Church 'Christuskirche' had this new award-winning campus designed by the firm Fields Devereaux Architects & Engineers (now Harley Ellis Devereaux) in 1998. The unique design features a series of obliquely truncated cylindrical masses enclosed in a complementary enclosed, circular courtyard. The design was the recipient of the California Council, Society of American Registered Architects 'Design Excellence Award' in 2000. In 1998, it was honored with the City of Glendale 'Glendale Beautiful Award'.

    The Christuskirche is located at 556 W. Glenoaks Blvd. in Glendale, CA.
  • Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, Eugene Kinn Choy, Architect
    Chinatown Family Associations are organized according to family surnames. These social clubs or lodges were first set up in Chinatown to serve the social and personal needs of Chinese workers. The success and survival of the early Chinatown depended a great deal on the family benevolent Associations which served as political and social support systems to newcomers. The members strove to meet the basic needs of the community, and represented a united voice in the fight against discriminatory legislation process.

    Born in Guangdong, China, Eugene Kinn Choy immigrated with his parents to the United States in 1898. They settled in Bakersfield, where the family made a living selling blue jeans to the farm hands working the fields of California's Central Valley. He enrolled in the University of Southern California School of Architecture, following in the path of Gilbert Leong. He was politically active on campus, serving in the Architecture School Student Senate and Alpha Lambda, a Chinese American student group.

    After graduation in 1939, he put his career ambitions on hold due to World War II; he went to work for Hughes Aircraft until the war was over. Resuming his architectural career, he became the first Chinese American in California to join the AIA; second only to New York-based I.M. Pei. He launched his own architectural practice with a small staff; designing a wide range of projects. He collaborated with his younger brother, Allan Kinn Choy, also a practicing architect, on several projects, including the FBI Office Building in Las Vegas,

    Located at 931 N. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90012
  • Chiat-Day-Mojo Advertising Agency, Gehry & Associates; Claes Oldenburg & Coosje van Bruggen 1985-91
    It would be difficult for even the most casual observer to miss Fank O. Gehry's Chiat-Day-Mojo Building on a stroll down Venice's Main Street. The facade is revealed in three distinct elements: on the left, an International Style 'ocean liner' (not pictured), in the middle, a pair of giant binoculars (designed with assistance from Claes Oldenburg and Coosjie van Bruggen) and to the far right, a massive, rusting 'temple' that defies description!

    Authors David Gebhard and Robert Winter (in their influential work, 'An Architectural Guide to Los Angeles') describe the assemblage as 'the greatest monument of the Postmodern in Los Angeles.' Like the Watts Towers, it is simply not to be missed. Located at the corner of Brooks and Main Street.
  • Chateau Marmont, Arnold A. Weitzman 1927
    The French Gothic style Chateau Marmont was designed by architect Arnold A. Weitzman, modeled after the Château d'Amboise, a royal retreat in the Loire Valley of France. The Chateau Marmont has long been a favorite haunt of celebrities including F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tim Burton, Jay McInerney, and Sofia Coppola. Coppola's 'Somewhere' was filmed at the hotel in 2010. Actor John Belushi was found dead in Bungalow #3 on March 5, 1982 of an apparent drug overdose. Designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 151) in 1976.

    The Chateau Marmont is located at 8221 Sunset Boulevard in West Hollywood, California.
  • Chateau Laurier, Leland Bryant, Architect 1929
    The Chateau Laurier is a French Normandy style apartment building designed by Leland Bryant in 1929. The Chateau consists of eighteen apartments in approximately 21,829 total square feet, four stories including weven 2 story units, and gated subterranean parking for 9 cars. A recent sale at the price of c.$4,250,000 included in the sale price an adjacent 5-unit building at 453 S. Wilton Place, built in 1919.,

    The Chateau is located at 4353 West 5th Street in Los Angeles.
  • Chateau Delaware, Arthur W. Hawes, Architect 1939
    Architect Arthur W. Hawes designed the Chateau Delaware in a French Normandy style for M. Rosenthal in 1939. Located at 1921 North Kenmore Avenue in the Los Feliz Village neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Charles H. Greenshaw Residence, Joseph Cather Newsom 1906
    Architect Joseph Cather Newson designed the Mission Revival style house for Charles H. Greenshaw in 1906. Located at 1102 Lantana Drive in the Garvanza Historic Preservation Overlay Zone. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 565) in 1992.
  • Charles Clifford Gibbons Residence, J.H. Bradbeer 1892
    Queen Anne Victorian style residence located in the historic West Adams neighborhood of Los Angeles at 2124 Bonsallo Avenue. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 496) in 1990.
  • Charles C.L. Leslie Residence, Oliver P. Dennis & Lyman Farwell, Architects c.1910
    Architects Oliver P. Dennis and Lyman Farwell designed the Queen Anne style mansion for oil executive Charles C. L. Leslie in 1910. (Some sources indicate that Dennis may have originally built the house for himself). The firm was among the city's top architectural offices at the turn of the century, continuing up until the mid-teens, designing the Jans House (HCM# 227) and the Magic Caste (HCM# 406) both in Hollywood. Designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1974 (No. 129). Located at 767 S. Garland Avenue in the Westlake (MacArthur Park) neighborhood of Los Angeles.



  • Charles Arnoldi Studio 1984
    Formerly a processing plant for Tasty Spuds potatoes, Artist Charles Arnoldi purchased the property in 1984, converting it into a studio space. Arnoldi is best known for his abstract paintings, often using tree twigs and branches to make up the lines within his compositions. Located at 721 Hampton Drive in Venice, California.
  • Chapman Park Studio Building, Morgan, Walls & Clements Architects 1928-1929
    A fine example of Spanish Revival Architecture, the Chapman Building is situated on the northwest corner of West 6th Street and Alexandria Avenue west of MacArthur Park. It is adjacent to the Chapman Park Market, an early attempt at incorporating the convenience of a shopping mall with an auto park. The buildings underwent an extensive restoration in 1991 by Brenda Levin & Associates, a firm that also restored the nearby Wiltern Theater in 1985. The building is in the style of the Mediterranean Revival with Churrigueresque details. It is constructed of brick and steel with a facing of plaster, cast stone and wrought iron.

    The Chapman Studio Building is located at 3501-3519 West 6th Street. It was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1984 (No. 280).

  • Chapel of the Jesus Ethic, Culver Heaton, Architect (1966)








    The Chapel of the Jesus Ethic is an integral part of the Ann Ree Colton Foundation of Niscience, co-founded in 1953 by Ann Ree Colton and Jonathan Murro., for the purpose of preserving and distributing the teachings of 'Niscience' teachings, blending religion, philosophy, science, and the creative arts to inspire its members to live creative and spiritual lives. Considered a prophet to her followers, Colton authored more than twenty books in her lifetime outlining her unique brand of spiritual philosophy.

    The Chapel was part of the Los Angeles Conservancy Tour, 'City of the Seekers: L.A.'s Unique Spiritual Legacy' on Saturday, March 14, 2010. Considered a gem of Mid-Century style, the building was designed by Architect Culver Heaton (1912-1992) in 1966.

    Located at 336 West Colorado Street in Glendale, California.





  • Chalet Apartments, Frank M. Tyler 1913
    Craftsman style 19-unit apartment building, disguised as a large home. Located in the historic West Adams neighborhood of Los Angeles at 2375 Scarff Street.

    Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No.467) in 1989.
  • Central High School, HMC Group/Coop Himmelb(1) au 2008








    Designed by Wolf D. Prix and the Austrian firm Coop Himmelb(l)au, Central High School #9 has given downtown Los Angeles an unorthodox new symbol and striking piece of architecture complimenting the downtown skyline..Three curving structures- a cone-shaped library, a soaring lobby and a 140-foot tower- are its most interesting architectural elements. Located at 450 N. Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Cedars Estate, Xorin Balbes, Sue Wong & Zoltan Papp, Restoration 2003-2004
    Originally built in 1926, The 'Cedars' is one of the most storied old Hollywood glamour estates, originally built for film director Marcel Tourneur, and reputed to be the home of silent screen star Norma Talmadge, although never proven. In an interview published in 'Antiques & Fine Art' by Lynn Morgan, Sue Wong, an avid student of history and art claims ' Errol Flynn practiced his 'wicked, wicked ways here; Marilyn Monroe was a frequent guest. Howard Hughes played the grand piano in the solarium, and Johnny Depp lived here to do research for his role in Ed Wood because Bela Lugosi had lived here. The wrap party for Easy Rider was held here; Dennis Hopper shot some scenes for the movie here. It was also a big rock 'n' roll party pad. Arthur Lee of the band 'Love' lived here for a while.'

    It is said that the home is a replica of a 17th Century Florentine villa owned by the Duke of Alba. It was last sold in August 2004, setting a record price of $5.3M for the Los Feliz area.

    'The Cedars' is located at 4320 Cedarhurst Circle in Los Feliz.
  • Cathedral of the Disciples, Robert H. Orr, Architect 1922-23
    The west front of the church.
  • Cathedral of the Disciples, Robert H. Orr, Architect 1922-23
    This magnificent Rose Window of French design adorns the west nave above the balcony. The window was designed by Judson Studios and is a copy of the one in Rheims Cathedral.
  • Cathedral of the Disciples Wilshire Christian Church Robert H. Orr, Architect 1922-23
    Built in the Northern Italian Romanesque Style and designed by Robert H. Orr, one of the most influential ecclesiastical architects of the early twentieth century. The property was given to the church by the Chapman Brothers who owned the nearby Chapman Market and a hotel in the area. The structure of the building is of reinforced concrete; the overhead roof beams, which appear to be made of wood are in reality structural steel which has been covered in plaster and painted to look like wood. A hammered copper cross over the pulpit was crafted by one of the church's members.

    The church is located along the Wilshire Corridor at 634 S. Normandie Avenue (at the intersection of Wilshire Boulevard) an area rich in architectural diversity. It was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1979 (No. 209).
  • Cathedral of St. Sophia, Gus Kalionzes, Architect 1948
    Inspired by the design of the Hagia Sophia, the Cathedral of the Holy Wisdom of God, built by the Emperor Justinian in Constantinople between 543 and 537 A.D., the new Greek orthodox cathedral was financed entirely by a gift from Charles P.Skouras, who along with his brothers Spyros and George, were among the most influential figures in the Hollywood film community. (Spyros was a President of Twentieth Century Fox; George, President and Chairman of the Board of United Artists Theaters on the East Coast; and Charles was President of National Theaters and Fox West Coast Theaters). Charles, who had a particular interest in the design of theater buildings oversaw the design and construction of the new cathedral. Completion of the new cathedral took four years, in part because of the disruptive effects of World War II.

    Given Charles Skouras interest in theater design, he had at his disposal a cadre of artisans, painters and guilders involved in decorating his many theaters across the country. He selected a fellow Greek, William Chavalas to serve as his Master Artist. The richly gilded sanctuary has a unique blend of Italian Renaissance and Byzantine elements, highlighted by massive chandeliers of Czechoslovakian crystal and lovely mosaics.

    The Cathedral of St. Sophia is located at 1324 South Normandie Avenue. It was designated an Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles in 1973 (No. 120).
  • Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, Rafael Moneo, Architect 2002
    Pritzker Prize-winning Spanish architect was selected to design a new cathedral for Los Angeles, replacing St. Vibiana Cathedral, which had been badly damaged in the 1994 Northridge Earthquake. The cathedral is spiritual home to Los Angeles' four million Catholics, the largest diocese in the United States and seat of its archbishop.

    The post-modern design has no right angles; the 12-story high edifice can accomodate 3,000 worshippers. Tapestries by John Nava decorate the warm-toned alabaster walls of the sanctuary, creating a soft illumination.

    The Cathedral is located at 555 Temple Street in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, Rafael Moneo, Architect 2002
    A handsome 2.5 acre plaza separates the cathedral proper from the Cathedral Center, which houses the parish offices, a restaurant, conference center, and gift shop. The plaza offers outdoor seating, water features and several gardens.
  • Cathedral of Our Lady of Los Angeles, Rafael Moneo, Architect 2002
    Interior view. The honey-colored alabaster walls and tapestries by John Neva define the sanctuary.
  • Cates Apartments, Paul R. Williams 1930
    Architect Paul Revere Williams designed the Spanish Colonial Revival style 8-unit apartment complex in 1930 for A.P. Cates. Located at 1972-1974 N. Palmerston Place in the Los Feliz Village neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Castle Ivar, 2061 Ivar Avenue, Hollywood
    A real Hollywood fantasy of sorts, the Castle Ivar, I am told, was built on a love promise that reads something like, 'If you build me a castle, I'll marry you'. Taking the vow to heart, our hero built this castle for his beloved as late as 2002 demolishing a small indistinguished house and replacing it with this medieval beauty. Unfortunately, as seems to be the case in Hollywood these days, the couple broke up after only two years.
  • Castle Green, Frederick Roehrig, Architect 1898
    In creating the Castle Green Hotel, Architect Frederick Roehrig blended Spanish, Moorish & Victorian elements to bring us one of Pasadena's most beautiful and enduring monuments. Using structural steel with brick walls and concrete floors, the building was Pasadena's first fireproof building. During its heyday, the Hotel was the center of Pasadena society as home of the Tournament of Roses and the Valley Hunt Club.

    Though major portions of the complex have disappeared through time, the Castle Green continues as individually owned condominiums. The public rooms, including the Grand Lobby with its mosaic tile floor and marble stairway and the Palm Terrace Ballroom have been restored to their original beauty.

    The Castle Green is located at 99 S. Raymond Avenue in Pasadena. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, the State of California Historic Register, and the Pasadena List of Historic Places.
  • Castle Green, Frederick Roehrig, Architect 1898
    Exterior View.
  • Castle Green Hotel, Frederick Roehrig Architect, 1898
    Lavish interiors mark the public rooms of the hotel.
  • Castillo del Lago, John Delario, Architect, 1926
    The legendary Castillo del Lago sits perched atop a hill overlooking Griffith Park and Lake Hollywood. It was Bugsy Siegel's hideway in the 1930's (there are rumored to be bullet holes in the woodwork) until police conducted a raid entering from a neighbor's house.

    The actress/singer Madonna purchased the home in the 90's renovating it in a bold color scheme of deep reds and yellows under direction of her brother, Decorator Christopher Ciccone. The house has 32 rooms in 7,783 sq. ft., 9 bedrooms and 6 baths.

    The home is located at 5342 Mulholland Highway. It can best be seen from the hiking trail which runs along its side.
  • Case Study House No. 8, The Eames House, Charles & Ray Eames, Architects 1949
    The Eames House demonstrates the power of 'machine' architecture in both design and setting: situated on a bluff overlooking the Pacific Ocean, the two metal-framed boxes that comprise the Eames home and studio are set against a meadow surrounded by a grove of ancient Eucalyptus. Primary-colored panels, reminiscent of a Da Stijl painting, give the impression of a free-standing art exhibit, seductively drawing us in.

    The architect/owners sought to design a home that would serve as a background for their work, or as Charles liked to say, 'life in work, with nature as a shock-absorber.'

    On September 20, 2006, the Eames House was designated a National Historic Monument. The Eames House is located at 203 Chautauqua Blvd. in the Pacific Palisades. Today, the house is administered by the Eames Foundation. Exterior self-guided tours of the house are available Monday through Saturday for individuals and groups by reservation only. Visit the Eames Foundation website for more information.
  • Case Study House No. 8, Eames House, Charles & Ray Eames, Architects 1949
    The 1000-square foot studio adjacent to the main house, with a 'Mondrian-style' panel. The detached studio is separated from the house by a courtyard equivalent to four interior bays.
  • Case Study House No. 22 (Stahl House) Pierre Koenig, Architect 1960
    At the end of World War II, there was a great demand for low cost housing in Southern California with literally thousands of veterans returning home. As editor of 'Arts & Architecture' magazine, John Entenza assumed a leadership position, and deserves special recognition for envisioning the Case Study Program. In 1945, the magazine commissioned the design of eight homes, and promoted the program until 1966, with the completion of 24 houses and 1 apartment complex in the process. The original idea was to provide a model for low cost housing with good architectural design that could be replicated. Many of the homes that were eventually built in the program could hardly be described as 'affordable' however.

    The Stahl House has received the most recognition of all the Case Study Houses, primarily due to an iconic photograph taken by Julius Shulman shortly after the home was completed in 1960. In the photograph, two women are engaged in conversation, seated together in a glass house that appears suspended over the spectacular evening view of the city of Los Angeles below. It is perhaps the most reproduced image of a house in the history of photography. I had the pleasure of attending a party at the house in August 2008 as a guest of Designer Ron Fields. Ron invited Donna and me in a group of friends that included Julius Shulman for an unforgettable evening that I will always remember.

    The Stahl House is located at 1635 Woods Drive in West Hollywood. Unfortunately, you won't be able to appreciate the house from the street.
  • Casa Laguna, Arthur B. and Nina Zwebell, Architects 1928
    Spanish Andalusian style apartment complex designed by the husband-and-wife architectural team of Arthur and Nina Zwebell.in their signature style. The pair also designed the Andalusia (1927); El Cabrillo (1928); Patio del Moro (1925) and La Rona (1927). The apartments are entered through a large central courtyard complete with a fountain and outdoor fireplace. Located at 6200 Franklin Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Casa de Adobe, Theodore Eisen 1917
    Eisen designed the simple, one-story adobe for the Hispanic Society as a museum. It is a faithful representation of an authentic hacienda of the Spanish-Mexican period, complete with an enclosed courtyard and fountain. The house was completely hand-built by Jose Valasquez. The museum is now administered by the Autry National Center, housing artifacts from the colonial era. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1990 (No. 493).

    The adobe is located at 4605 N. Figueroa Street in historic Highland Park.
  • Carr House, Lloyd Wright, Architect 1925
    Architect Lloyd Wright had a great influence on the architecture of Los Angeles during the mid-twenties, expressing the Spanish Colonial Revival style in increasingly abstract forms. The design of Los Angeles Times Editor Harry Carr and his wife Alice's home in Los Feliz is a notable example.

    Built on a triangular lot across the street from his Farrell House (designed a year earlier), the Carr House is a unique architectural expression with a central courtyard and grillwork typical of the revival style.

    The Carr House is located at 3202 Lowry Road in Los Feliz.
  • Carleton Monroe Winslow Residence, Carleton Monroe Winslow, 1922
    Spanish Colonial Revival style residence designed by prominent architect Carleton M. Winslow for himself and his family in 1922. The house was the recipient of the American Institute of Architects 'Honor Award' in 1923. Other important commissions by the architect include the Los Angeles Central Library (with Bertram Goodhue), the Carthay Circle Theater, the 1915 Panama–California Exposition complex at San Diego's Balboa Park (also with Goodhue) and St. Mary of the Angels Church on Finley Avenue, among many others.

    Located in the gated Laughlin Park community in the Los Feliz district, Los Angeles, California.
  • Carl Ray Residence, Harry S. Johnson, Architect 1926
    North Glendower Avenue in the foothills of Griffith Park is one of the loveliest streets in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles. The English Tudor house at No. 2405 has an interesting history: After Los Feliz Pioneer William Mead purchased the Griffith Estate in 1923, the parcel was purchased by Kemper Campbell and re-sold to Carl Ray in 1924. Subsequently the house became the property of Konstantin Efremov, First Secretary of the Embassy of the Union of Soviet Socialists Republics who sold the property to James Campos in 1951. In 1998, the property was sold to singer, pianist, and music revivalist Michael Feinstein the current owner.
  • Carl Grover Residence, Roberl L Byrd, Architect 1948
    Architect Robert Byrd designed the Cape Cod style house for Carl Grover in 1948. The architect designed dozens of homes in Los Angeles during three decades beginning in the 1920s. He collaborated with is son Gary in the latter part of his career. He was known for his modern 'indoor–outdoor' style – along with his use of bird houses embedded in the actual structure. Other notable designs by the architect include 10050 Cielo Drive in Benedict Canyon (1944); scene of the Sharon Tate murder; the Robert Taylor Ranch in Brentwood; the 'The Tree House' in Laurel Canyon, the Rock'n'roll tree house of Frank Zappa and a cottage at 2274 Ben Lomond Drive in Los Feliz.

    Located at 4053 Cromwell Avenue n the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Capitol Records Tower, Welton Becket & Associates 1954








    Easily the most recognizable symbol of Hollywood, the Capitol Records Tower is thought to be the first circular office building in America. Fashioned in the shape of a stack of records and a spire meant to represent the stylus of a phonograph, the building is an excellent example of the Programmaic style, i.e. taking on the form of the subject it is meant to promote.

    Located at 1750 Vine Street in Hollywood.
  • Capitol Records Building Expansion, M2A Architects








    As part of EMI/Capitol Records consolidation of its Los Angeles operations in Hollywood, M2A designed a 20,000 sf office expansion adjacent to the landmark Capitol Tower. The primary design challenge faced by the design team was to integrate the world renowned icon with the adjacent historic facade that occupies the corner of the site. The use of simple materials and continuation of primary building forms integrates the historic facade with the tower without challenging the integrity of either building.
    A substantial landscape plaza created between the two buildings provides for a company wide assembly space as well as an outdoor dining room to promote spontaneous interaction between different divisions of the company. The landscape plan, developed in conjunction with Mia Lehrer and Associates, continues the geometry of the new and historic buildings into the adjacent parking areas.
  • Campbell Divertimento Fountain, Luis Barragan & Raúl Ferrera, Architects 1996
    The Mayan-inspired Campbell Divertimento Fountain was designed by Luis Barragán, regarded as Mexico's greatest architect and his partner Raúl Ferrera. Although Barragan's participation in the project has been questioned, the names Barragán and Ferrera are clearly stamped on the blueprints dated 1987. (Reportedly only Ferrara signed them, however that was common practice for the period). The Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission recognized the fountain as 'a signature project of Barragán, an architect of international fame and an architect of great importance to contemporary Mexican culture.'

    I had the pleasure of visiting the fountain in May 2008, thanks to an invitation from Architectural Designer Tim Campbell who had just completed the restoration of the home.

    The Fountain is located within a private residence at 1150 Brooklawn Drive.Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1997 (No. 637).
  • Camino Nuevo High School, Daly Genik, Architects 2006

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    The school is situated on little more than a traffic island in one of the poorest neighborhoods of Los Angeles near Macarthur Park (Historic Filipinotown). The architect’s challenge was to “to find recoverable pieces of urban space” without isolating the school from the neighborhood, according to Kevin Daly, AIA, partner of Santa Monica-based Daly Genik Architects.

    For the high school, the architect was required to fit a 30,000-square-foot building onto just over an acre of land. The architect answered the challenge by providing two separate structures, a snake-like long building along the south side housing classrooms; on the north side, a smaller building housing the school’s administrative functions.
    A façade of curving, yellow-and-grey corrugated metal panels clad the buildings’ facade, mimicking the movement of automobiles that are in a constant state of motion around the school. The school is located at 3500 West Temple Street.
  • Camino Nuevo High School, Daly Genik, Architects 2006
    Pictured is the curving facade of yellow-and-grey corrugated metal panels mimicking the movement of automobiles, a constant movement around the school.
  • Calvary Cemetery Mausoleum, Ross Montgomery 1927-29
    The Calvary Cemetery might well be considered one of the most significant architectural monuments in the United States, bearing a strong resemblance to the Mausoleum at Halicarnassus, one of his Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The architect, Ross Gordon Montgomery, also designed the Romanesque style St. Cecilia's in Exposition Park and St. Andrew's in Pasadena. He lived in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles and died in March 1969.


    Located at 4201 E. Whittier Boulevard in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Caltrans District 7 Headquarters, Thom Mayne, Architect 2004
    Architect Thom Mayne received the 2005 Pritzker Prize for the design of the headquarters building of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) and the Los Angeles Department of Transportation, completed in 2004. The design is a glimpse at the future: environmentally-friendly photovoltaic cells transforming sunlight into electricity (on the southern wall) and double-thick glass (on the western-facing side) keeping interiors cool and eliminating the need for air-conditioning. The design and construction of the building were featured in four episodes ot 'Modern Marvels', a series on the History Channel, documenting the challenges of its Modern Marvels' documented the construction of tall buildings over the past two centuries.

    Located at 100 South Main Street in Downtown Los Angeles.
  • Caltrans District 7 Headquarters, Thom Mayne, Architect 2004
    The Eli & Edythe Broad Plaza at the Caltrans District 7 Headquarters.
  • California Science Center, Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Partnership, 1998
    Formerly the California Museum of Science & Industry, the California Science Center has reinvented itself from a science museum to a science education center, offering beautiful architecture and engaging exhibits that bring new life to Exposition Park.

    Thoughtfully designed by the partnership of Zimmer Gunsul Frasca in collaboration with Esherick, Homsey, Dodge & Davis, the new building has been seamlessly joined to the old Exposition Building, offering over 100 hands-on exhibits. The focal point of the new center is the three-story open-air rotunda, connecting the center to the 7-story IMAX theater. The entrance pavilion features a five story sculpture by artist Larry Kirkland.

    The California Science Center is located in Exposition Park, 700 State Drive, Los Angeles, CA 90037.
  • California Endowment Center, Rios Clementi Hale 2003
    Architects Rios Clementi Hale designed the California Endowment Headquarters in 2003. The complex is located at 1000 North Alameda Street in the historic core of Los Angeles. The center incorporates LEED sustainability features in a four story conference center, complete with meeting rooms, an open-air courtyard, and food service facilities. The project was honored with the Presidential Award from the Los Angeles Chapter of the AIA for 'Building Team of the Year'. The California Endowment was established in 1996 as a private, statewide health foundation with a mission to 'build a stronger state by expanding access to affordable, quality health care to underserved communities and improving the overall health of all Californians'.
  • California Club, Robert D. Farquhar, Architect 1929-30
    The architect chose a simplified classical design as 'befitting the proper atmosphere of American club life' for the California Club. The edifice is clad with Roman bricks and travertine trim elements. Robert D. Farquhar received his education at Exeter, Harvard, and MIT; he arrived in Los Angeles in the early 1900s. Other noteworthy designs by the architect include the Canfield-Moreno Estate in Silver Lake for actor Antoniio Moreno and heiress Daisy Canfield (1923); Clark Memorial Library (1924-26) in Exposition Park; Gorham House in Santa Monica 1910; currently (March 2011 on the market for ($12M) and Beverly Hills High School. The California Club is located at 538 Flower Street in downtown Los Angeles. It was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1966. (No. 43)
  • Cal Tech Winnett Student Center, A.D. Martin Partners, Architect 1998
    The architect must have had the undergraduate dormitories (designed by Gordon B. Kaufmann in 1931)across the commons in mind in selecting the design for the student center. Both have classical Italian Mediterranean Revival style lines; the colonnades on each structure are perfectly matched.

    The California Institute of Technology is located on California Boulevard in Pasadena, between Hill Avenue and California Boulevard.
  • Cal Tech Athenaeum, Gordon B. Kaufman, Architect 1930
    Named for Athena, the goddess of wisdom, Cal Tech's Athenaeum was established as a "temple where poets, philosophers, and orators gathered to read and discuss their work', and expanded to include academies and learned societies. Sir Walter Scott and Thomas Moore established the most famous Athenaeum in London in 1924; the CalTech Athenaeum is modeled on the same principle. Members included individuals known for their scientific or literary attainments, artists of eminence in all classes of the fine arts, and noblemen and gentlemen distinguished as Liberal patrons of science, literature, or the arts.

    As early as 1921, George Ellery Hale, renowned astronomer, Caltech trustee, and director of the Mount Wilson Observatory, envisioned an Athenaeum in Pasadena modeled after the club in London. In 1929, Mr. and Mrs. Allan C. Balch, presented the Institute with a gift worth $500,000 enabling the institute to build the Athenaeum.

    The building was designed by Gordon B. Kaufmann, built by William C. Crowell, and landscaped by Florence Yoch and Lucile Council.

    The first formal dinner was held in February 1931, with Albert Einstein and two other Nobel Prize winners, Albert Einstein, Robert A. Millikan, and A. A. Michelson in attendance. Located at 551 S. Hill Avenue in Pasadena, California.


  • Cahuenga Branch Library, Clarence H. Russell, Architect 1916








    The Renaissance Revival style library was built with funds provided by the Carnegie Foundation. Located at 4591 Santa Monica Blvd. in the Hollywood neighborhood of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1986 *(No. 314).
  • Cahill Center for Astronomy & Astrophysics, Thom Mayne, Architect 2009
    The overall architectural scheme at Cal Tech has never made much of an impresson on me; many of the early Italian-Mediterranean style structures have a bleakness about them; as if constrained by a tight budget. To make matters worse, much of the post WWII modernist buildings have done little to compliment the old.

    Reading (Los Angeles Times architecture critic) Christopher Hawthorne's review (dated February 16, 2009) of Architect Thom Mayne's new Cahill Center, I confess, gave me a thrill. Mayne's boldly 'fractured mass' is arresting and thought-provoking.
  • Cadman Drive Mediterranean Revival c.2008
    Recently-built (2008) Mediterranean Revival home in the Los Feliz district of Los Angeles. The four bedroom, five bath home has 4700 sq. feet of living space and is currently (October 2010) for sale for $1,595,000. Located at 3636 Cadman Drive, a cul-de-sac street that adjoins Griffith Park.
  • C.E. Kustor Residence, John Parkinson & Paul Martin, Architects 1901
    Referred to as the 'architect who built Los Angeles'* John Parkinson along with his son, Donald Parkinson designed many of the most famous buildings in the city today. Over sixty are mentioned in Martin Schall's website 'www.you-are-here.com', the definitive online directory of Los Angeles Architecture. His best-known achievements include several of the Northern Italian Renaissance buildings on the campus of the University of Southern California (Science Hall, Bovard Auditorium, Student Union), Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles City Hall, Bullock's Wilshire and Union Station.

    Parkinson partnered with architect Paul Martin in the eclectic design for the C.E. Kustor Residence, combining Victorian, Mission and Craftsman details.

    Located in the Adams-Normandie HPOZ District at 1630 West 24th Street.
  • Burkhalter Residence, 2309-2311 Scarff Street
    Queen Anne Style house built in 1895 as the residence for Dennis Burkhalter, the District Superintendent for the Southern Pacific Railroad. It has an almost identical twin in the property next door at 2305 Scarff Street. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1989 (No. 409). The home was destroyed by fire in 2006; the home was restored to its original appearance in 2009.
  • Burbank City Hall, William Allen & W. George Lutzi, Architects 1942
    Burbank City Hall is an art deco masterpiece designed by architects William Allen and W. George Lutzi in 1941 and completed in 1943 with funds provided by the Works Project Administration (WPA).

    The structure's 77-foot tower features art deco detailing and more than 20 types of marble. Two murals painted by Hugo Ballin; 'The Four Freedoms' in the Council Chamber and 'Burbank Industry' in the rotunda adorn the interiors. (Ballin also painted the murals at the Griffith Observatory and Wilshire Boulevard Temple). It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1996. Located at 275 E. Olive Ave., Burbank, California.


  • Bullock's Wilshire- John & Donald Parkinson, Architects 1928
    One of the most recognizable symbols of Los Angeles art deco architecture (along with the Wiltern Theater built a few years earlier and less than a mile to the east), the Bullock's Wilshire Department Store represents a cathedral of commerce with its elegant tower and walls encased in a beige-colour terra cotta with green copper moderne embellishments.

    Designed by John and Donald Parkinson, the principal architects of the early classical architecture at the University of Southern California, the interior is principally the work of John Peters and retains most of its original art deco design elements.

    The Bullocks Wilshire Department Store is located at 3050 Wilshire Blvd. In 1968, it was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles (No. 56). Currently the structure houses the Southwestern University Law Library.
  • Buff House, Buff and Hensman Architects 1988
    Conrad Buff III and his wife Libby sought a new and more accessible location than the exposed hilltop upon which they were living for their last personal residence. Choosing a cool and wooded site in the San Rafael hills, the multi-level structure expresses the design language common to his architects' later projects. The house was most recently listed for sale and sold in June 2012, and described in the listing 'rectilinear living modules appear to be stacked atop each other. The vertical massing creates an evocative presence from the street. Unlike the wooden post and beam structures this team is famous for, Buff House is clad in gunite stucco and utilizes commercial grade materials throughout. With privacy in mind, the interior benefits from narrow vertical glazing and thoughtfully placed walls of glass that open to outdoor living areas and the urban forest beyond. Recent interior appointments by previous owner HGTV's design personality Kristan Cunningham make this home feel fresh and current'.

    Located at 480 Glen Holly Drive in the San Raphael hills of Pasadena, California.
  • Bubeck House, A.E. Morris, Architect 1956
    Morris designed the house for Max Bubeck, a partner in the Glendale Saw Works. It was the architect's first commission and one of his best. The living room, shown here, is anchored by the sculptural chimney fashioned as a stepped concrete block pylon. The hearth rises from the floor and extends dramatically though the roof.

    Located at 4166 Verdugo View Drive in the Glassell Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Bryson Apartment Hotel, Frederick Noonan & Charles H. Kysor 1913








    The Bryson was designed by architects Frederick Noonan and Charles H. Kysor in a Beaux Arts Classical Style in 1913.

    At the time of its opening, it had 320 rooms divided into 96 apartments, with a configuration allowing apartments to be connected to form suites with as many as 12 rooms. All four sides of the building 'presented a finished appearance', each being 'handsomely ornamented with vari-colored tiles and concrete moulding,' according to a Los Angeles Times review. 'The interior was finished with cut-glass chandeliers, Italian marble stairs and wainscotting, tile floors, and richly upholstered mahogany furniture.' The tenth floor was dedicated to common use, with a ballroom, library, billiard-room and three enclosed loggias.

    The historic building is closely associated with the film noir history, having been featured in 'The Grifters' and in books by Raymond Chandler. The Bryson was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983 and designated a Historic Cultural Monument (HCM #653) by the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission in 1998.

    Located at 2701 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles, California

  • Brunswig Drug Company Factory, AC Martin Partners 1931
    The former art deco style Brunswick Drug has been re-purposed as an eight story office building, Brunswig Square, in Los Angeles' Little Tokyo district. Located at 360 East Second Street.
  • Broad Center for the Biological Sciences, Pei Cobb Freed & Partners 2002
    The Broad Center for the Biological Sciences was designed by Pei Cobb Freed & Partners of New York and completed in 2002. The 120,000-sf facility is the cornerstone of Caltech's $100M initiative to strengthen research capabilities. The center is designed to encourage interaction and collaboration through the use of shared laboratories, as well as shared support spaces. Interaction and information sharing is also fostered in lobbies, casual meeting rooms, kitchenettes, conference rooms, and seminar rooms throughout the facility. The flexible facility is designed to adapt to constantly evolving technology, and in additon to generic labs and support facilities houses an experimental MRI suite, a high-resolution X-ray diffraction facility, an electronic diffraction facility for studying complex molecular structures, and a vivarium for developmental and neurological research.

    The Cal Tech campus is located at 1200 E California Boulevard in Pasadena, California.
  • Britt Mansion & Gardens- A.F. Rosenheim, Architect 1910
    Designed for attorney Eugene W. Britt by architect A.F. Rosenheim in 1910, this elegant Classical Revival home is headquarters for the LA '84 Foundation, appropriating surplus funds from the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics for youth sports programs.

    The Britt Mansion and Formal Gardens is located at 2141 West Adams Boulevard. In 1978, it was recognized as a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 197).
  • Briarcliff View, John Pugliese, Assoc. AIA - Cambia Designs LLC 2010





    Long-time AIA/LA Docent John Pugliese designed the house for himself, fulfilling a desire to start a new career in architecture. It will be featured on the 2010 AIA Los Angeles Chapter Fall Home Tour (THE HILLS: EAST TO WEST Sunday September 19 from 11:00 AM - 4:00 PM. Located at 5720 Briarcliff Road.
  • Bret Israel Residence, Kevin Michael Daly, Architect 2009
    Santa Monica-based architect Kevin Michael Daly designed the modernist style house for Los Angeles Times Entertainment Editor Bret Israel in 2009. Located at 2633 Hollyridge Drive in the Hollywood Hills.
  • Breed Street Shul, Edelman & Barnett, Architects c.1920
    The last surviving synagogue from the early 20th century in Boyle Heights, Breed Street Shul (Congregation Talmud Torah) is reminiiscent of B'nai Jeshurun Synagogue in New York City, designed by W.S. Schneider and H.B. Hertz in 1918.

    The synagogue built of brick, was severly damaged during the 1987 Whittier Narrows Earthquake. It was closed permanently in the mid '90s, and has since suffered extensive deterioration. The J. Paul Getty Trust is leading an effort to preserve the property and adapt for re-use as a community center.

    The Breed Street Shul is located at 247 N. Breed Street in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Braly-Continental Building, John Parkinson 1902
    Originally known as the Braly Building, the 12-story structure is considered Los Angeles' first skyscraper. It was the tallest building in Los Angeles until 1907. Note the richly-decorated cornice. In recent years the building was converted into lofts as 'The Continental'. Declared a Historic Cultural Landmark (No. 730) in 2002.

    Located at 408 S. Spring Street in downtown Los Angeles' historic bank district.
  • Bradbury Building, George Wyman Architect 1893; Levin & Associates Restoration 1991



    Architect George Wyman's greatest achievement, the Bradbury Building ranks as one of the most elegant and well-known interiors of any in the world. The mildly Romanesque exterior belies the visual treat of the building's fabulous inner court. Bathed in light streaming from an iron and glass ceiling, with lacy iron balconies, a hand-operated cage elevator, and honey-colored, glazed brick walls, it is no wonder that the building has been used in numerous films, including 'Blade Runner' and 'Wolf'. Declared a Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Monument (No. 6) in 1962, It is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Located at 304 S. Broadway in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Bradbury Building, George Wyman Architect 1893; Levin & Associates Restoration 1991



    Architect George Wyman's greatest achievement, the Bradbury Building ranks as one of the most elegant and well-known interiors of any in the world. The mildly Romanesque exterior belies the visual treat of the building's fabulous inner court. Bathed in light streaming from an iron and glass ceiling, with lacy iron balconies, a hand-operated cage elevator, and honey-colored, glazed brick walls, it is no wonder that the building has been used in numerous films, including 'Blade Runner' and 'Wolf'. Declared a Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Monument (No. 6) in 1962, It is also listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Located at 304 S. Broadway in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Braasch House 'Good Wil Hunting House', Jean L. Egasse, Architects 1923

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    Originally part of the vast acreage of a late 1800s working farm, Albert Braasch, an entrepreneur and owner of Braasch Manufacturing Company, purchased the property in the early 1900s, subsequently subdividing and selling off adjacent lots while keeping the property on which the original farmhouse stood. Albert commissioned local architect Jean L. Egasse to help him redesign the house along 'Norman lines, such as were left by the decendents of the Vikings, following their journey from an ante-medieval period.' ('California Southland, December 1923').

    The collaboration between architect and owner is evident in the architect's 'French-cum-Nordic' theme, inspired by Albert Braash's masculine sensibilities. Albert's wife, Constance, a popular local music teacher and artist, added her own touch with fanciful wall sculptures and murals, some of which are still intact. The medieval theme mingles with storybook fantasy as noted in the book 'Los Angeles: An Architectural Guide', 'expecting Hansel and Gretel to appear' at any moment.

    Ben Affleck and Matt Damon wrote the script for 'Good Will Huntiing' while living at the house. The movie went on to win the Academy Award for Best Screenplay.

    The estate is located on Eagle Rock's fashionable Hill Drive and is currently (October 2011) listed for sale for $799,000..
  • Bowen House, Elmer Grey, Architect; Florence Yoch, Landscape Design 1925
    Architect Elmer Grey designed the English Tudor style Bowen House in 1925. The seven bedroom, 5 1/2 bath 8,160 sq. ft. mansion last sold in March 2011 for just over $6M. In the listing, the property was described as ,'gorgeous classic public rooms with detailed plaster ceilings, stone fireplaces and polished hand-carved woodwork. lush grounds include expansive lawns, rose gardens, pool, detached two bedroom guest house, tennis court, separate two room staff wing and 4 car garage'.

    The Bowen House is located at 336 S. Hudson Avenue in the exclusive Hancock Park neighborhood of Los Angeles
  • Bowen House, Charles & Henry Greene 1905
    The early Craftsman style house, originally designed by Charles and Henry Greene in 1905 has been significantly altered over time, but retains much dignity. Located at 444 E. Calaveras Street in the foothill community of Altadena, California.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • Bovard Administration Building, USC, John & Donald Parkinson, Architects 1920-21
    The first Master Plan for the campus of the University of Southern California proposed in 1919 by Architect John Parkinson included a series of Italian Renaissance style buildings connected by a series of Romanesque style bridges that were to be built over the streets. Although the bridges were never realized, the Parkinsons completed a half dozen of these handsome edifices that defined the early architecture of the university.

    The first of Parkinson's buildings to be completed was the George Finley Bovard Administration Building, in 1921. Described as 'northern Italian Romanesque style', the building's dominating feature is a square bell tower with eight heroic sculptures by John Caspar Lachne representing the 'Progress of Civilization'. The eight figures are of American Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt, Roman orator and statesman Marcus Tullius Cicero and Greek philosopher Plato, John Wesley, Founder of Methodism, and three leading Methodist clergymen: Bishop Matthew Simpson, Preacher and College President; Phillips Brooks, the Fifth Bishop of Massachusetts and 158th in succession in the American episcopate, and a Methodist pastor and chair of Philosophy at Boston University.
  • Bourne House, Wallace Neff, Architect; Katherine Bashford, Landscape Design 1927
    Architect Wallace Neff designed the Bourne House in a refined Spanish Colonial Revival style. Located at 2035 Lombardy Road in San Marino, California.
  • Boston House, Clarence J.Smale, Architect 1924




    Italianate Mediterranean style mansion designed for W.O. Boston by Architect C.J. Smale in 1924. The house was later owned by classical composer Charles T. Haubiel. The vintage home is currently (September 2010) on the market and priced at $1,899,000. Realtor Brian Moore, who has the listing on the house, gave me a tour yesterday, September 7, 2010. The two story house is described as a 'Grande Dame', with period details in over 4000 sq. feet of living space. The two-story entry foyer is especially impressive, with its grand staircase, original marble floors, and second story cloistered mezzanine. Located at 4941 Ambrose Avenue.

    Smale also designed the Mediterranean Revival style Monsignor O'Brien Residence on Catalina Street (declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (#861) in 2007, the historically-designated Loyola Theater in Westchester (recently converted to an office building) and the Smith House at Second and Hudson Avenue in Hancock Park, as well as numerous other movie palaces most of which have been demolished.
    Italianate Mediterranean style mansion designed for W.O. Boston by Architect C.J. Smale in 1924. The house was later owned by classical composer Charles T. Haubiel. The vintage home is currently (September 2010) on the market and priced at $1,899,000. Realtor Brian Moore, who has the listing on the house, gave me a tour yesterday, September 7, 2010. The two story house is described as a 'Grande Dame', with period details in over 4000 sq. feet of living space. The two-story entry foyer is especially impressive, with its grand staircase, original marble floors, and second story cloistered mezzanine. Located at 4941 Ambrose Avenue.

    Smale also designed the Mediterranean Revival style Monsignor O'Brien Residence on Catalina Street (declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (#861) in 2007, the historically-designated Loyola Theater in Westchester (recently converted to an office building) and the Smith House at Second and Hudson Avenue in Hancock Park, as well as numerous other movie palaces most of which have been demolished.
    Italianate Mediterranean style mansion designed for W.O. Boston by Architect C.J. Smale in 1924. The house was later owned by classical composer Charles T. Haubiel. The vintage home is currently (September 2010) on the market and priced at $1,899,000. Realtor Brian Moore, who has the listing on the house, gave me a tour yesterday, September 7, 2010. The two story house is described as a 'Grande Dame', with period details in over 4000 sq. feet of living space. The two-story entry foyer is especially impressive, with its grand staircase, original marble floors, and second story cloistered mezzanine. Located at 4941 Ambrose Avenue.

    Smale also designed the Mediterranean Revival style Monsignor O'Brien Residence on Catalina Street (declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (#861) in 2007, the historically-designated Loyola Theater in Westchester (recently converted to an office building) and the Smith House at Second and Hudson Avenue in Hancock Park, as well as numerous other movie palaces most of which have been demolished.
  • Bolton Hall, George Harris, Builder 1913
    Designed and built by rock mason and stone sculptor George Harris as a community center for the Utopian community of Los Terrenitos (Spanish for “Little Landers”). Between 1920 and 1925, the building served as an American Legion hall. In 1925, Tujunga incorporated as a city, and Bolton Hall became Tujunga City Hall. In 1932, Tujunga was annexed into the City of Los Angeles, and Bolton Hall was used for the next 25 years for a variety of municipal services, including the San Fernando Valley's second public library and a jail. However, it remained known as Tujunga City Hall until its closure in 1957.

    In 1957, the building was closed. For more than 20 years, Bolton Hall remained vacant and was the subject of debates over demolition and restoration. Since 1980, the building has been operated by the Little Landers Historical Society as a local history museum.

    Located at 10116 Commerce Avenue in Tujunga. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1962 (no. 2)
  • Bolt House, Jasper Newton Preston & Seymour Locke 1893
    Also known as 'Cobbleoak' and one of the oldest houses in Pasadena, the house was designed for Frank C. Bolt, President of the San Gabriel Bank. As a young boy, Bolt served in the Civil War as a mail carrier and witnessed President Lincoln's last address. Nearby Lock Haven Street is named for the architect Seymour Locke,his family owned nearby acreage.

    Located at 395 S. Grand Avenue in the Lower Arroyo neighborhood of Pasadena.
  • Bob's Big Boy Restaurant, Wayne McAllister, Architect 1949

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    Architect Wayne McAllister (1907-2000) was a principal champion of the Googie style of architecture, elevating the drive-in coffee shop and Las Vegas casino to a high level of art. The Burbank restaurant he designed for Bob Wian, founder of the Bob's Big Boy chain, was the first in a group of xix in the Los Angeles area and the only one still in existence.

    The thirty-five foot tall neon sign is the restaurants most striking and conspicuous feature, however the 'real action' was in the back, according to author Chris Nichols, who wrote the book, 'The Leisure Architecture of Wayne McAllister'.(Gibbs Smith, Publisher 2007), 'You couldn't get into the place on Friday nights. It seemed like everybody in town stopped at Bob's that night. They were attracted by the good food, gorgeous waitresses and the action.'

    At the peak of its popularity, the chain could claim 750 restaurants in 1958. In 1967 the chain was sold to the Marriott Corporation, which decimated the brand by regionalizing its name. By 1988, Marriott sold off the restaurants one at a time.

    Bob's Big Boy in Burbank is located at 4211 Riverside Drive. The restaurant was designated a California Point of Historical Interest in 1993. For more information on 'Googie' architecture, the book 'Googie Redux: Ultramodern Roadside Architecture' by author Alan Hess is a must.
  • Bloomingdale's Glendale, Kevin Kennon Architects 2013
    The New York-based architectural firm Kevin Kennon Architects rejuvenated the preexisting brick facade of the original building for Bloomingdale's a new tenant at the Glendale Galleria. The new design features a pixelated pattern of 2'x2' squares in an 'array of metals', including glass, metal and marble. Located at 103 South Brand Boulevard in Glendale, California.
  • Bloch House, Vahran Jebejian 1973
    Contemporary post-and-beam style residence designed by local architect Vahran Jebejian in 1973. The house was listed in the Glendale Register of Historic Resources in 2009 (no. 79). Located at 1758 Rohr Street in the historic Cumberland Heights neighborhood of Glendale, California.
  • Blinn House, George Washington Maher, Architect 1905-06







    Designed by Chicago-based architect George W. Maher, one of the very few he designed in the west (the other is a combined public library and water tower in Fresno). The house is designed in the Prairie School style. The house is now home of the Women's City Club of Pasadena and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

    Located at 160 N. Oakland Avenue in Pasadena, California.

  • Blessed Sacrament School, Thomas Franklin Power, Architect 1923
    Power completed the parochial school in 1923, before beginning work on the Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church next door. The facade is a celebration of the baroque Italian Renaissance style.
  • Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church, Thomas Franklin Power, Architect 1928-1954
    Founded in 1904, Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church has served as the home parish for many of Hollywood's elite including Ann Blyth, Bing Crosby, Irene Dunne, John Ford, Ricardo Monalban and Loretta Young. The church was dedicated in June 1928, however the interior design (under the direction of architect J. Earl Trudeau) was not completed until 1954.

    The church and adjoining school were designed in the Italian Renaissance style by Architect Thomas Franklin Power. Movie-goers might remember the church in a scene in the movie 'LA Confidential' and in the television series 'ER'.

    Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church is located at 6657 W. Sunset Blvd. in Hollywood.
  • Blair International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle School, gkkworks 2011
    Architectural firm gkkworks designed the 600-student, 42,000 square foot school as part of a larger campus master plan, sharing the athletic fields, gymnasium space, and support services with adjacent Blair High School. A main feature of the design is a community courtyard, which acts like a city plaza, inviting interaction and participation; the configuration creates a 'community within itself, giving the educational environment a distinct space separate from the outside world'. Classrooms have large floor-to-ceiling windows, giving relief from the traditional confined classroom interior.

    The architects, gkkworks, received a Merit Award from the San Fernando Valley Chapter of the American Institute of Architects for the project's design. In presenting the Award the AIA jury commented that ''the project demonstrates the architect's mastery of light, space, color, and material.'

    Located at 1201 South Marengo Avenue in , Pasadena, California.
  • Blackburn Residence, Paul R. Williams, Architect 1927
    Designed by Paul R. Williams, the 'Architect of the Stars' for Bruce and Lula Blackburn. (Mr. Blackburn's claim to fame is the invention of the rollup window screen). Williams designed the home in the Spanish Colonial Revival style, and set it in a lush tropical landsape in the hills of Los Feliz. Its most prominent feature is a two-story turreted tower. One of three residences located in Los Feliz that was honored with 'historical monument' status by the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission in 2008, (the others are the Victor Rosetti Residence, also designed by Williams, and the Edward Petitfils Residence, also known as 'Los Pavoreales' designed by Wallace Neff in 1927).

    The Blackburn Residence is located at 4791 Cromwell Avenue. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 2008 (No,. 913)
  • Bjornson Studio & Home, Arata Isozaki 1986
    The house was the first commission for Arata Isozaki, the architect of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) in downtown Los Angeles. A facade of stucco boxes is broken up by angled corner skylights. Located at 16 Paloma Court near the boardwalk in Venice Beach, California.
  • Birtcher-Share House, Harwell Hamilton Harris 1942
    The Birtcher-Share House is one of the most beautiful to be found in the Mt. Washington neighborhood of Los Angeles. Unfortunately i wasn't able to get much of a picture. (While I knocked on the door today, hoping to get a closer look, I found no one to be at home, but will try again on another day. I have since given up on the idea of 'waiting for the perfect moment', knowing that I may 'never pass this way again', as the saying goes).. The architect is most frequently associated with the Wrightian concept of 'organic architecture' expressed in natural materials, in this case wood.

    The Birtcher-Share House is located at 4234 Sea View Lane in the Mt. Washington neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Declared a Los Angeles Historic Cultural Monument (No. 612) in 1994.
  • Biltmore Hotel, Schultze & Weaver, Architects 1922-23
    The idea of a grand hotel in downtown Los Angeles originated with Joseph Sartori, a prominent banker, who wanted to show the world that Los Angeles had 'arrived'. Sartori called together 40 prominent business leaders to explore the idea. The group selected the New York architectural firm Shultze & Weaver, by now famous for the design of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, to come up with a suitable design. A gala week-long opening in 1923 boasted Hollywood's elite, including Mary Pickford, Cecille B. deMille, and Jack Warner in attendance.

    The hotel has maintained a stellar reputation over the years. The idea for an 'Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences' was hatched in the Crystal Ballroom in May 1927. In 1977, Bob Hope hosted a banquet in the same room, celebrating the Academy's 50th Anniversary. The hotel and adjacent Biltmore Theater (now the Biltmore Tower), hosted the Academy Awards ceremony in the years 1931, 1935-39 and 1941-42. In 1960, when the Democratic National Convention was held in Los Angeles, Sen. John F. Kennedy set up his campaign headquarters at the hotel's Music Room; his running mate Lyndon Johnson was across the hall in the Emerald Room. In 1964, the Beatles visited the Presidential Suite during their first U.S. tour.

    The Biltmore Hotel is located at 506 S. Grand Avenue in downtown Los Angeles. In 1969, it was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 60)
  • Bilike House, Parkinson & Bergstrom 1905-6
    Architect John Parkinson who designed many of Los Angeles’ most important landmarks formed a partnership with G. Edwin Bergstrom in 1905. Over the next ten years, Parkinson and Bergstrom became a dominant architectural firm for major structures in Los Angeles until the partnership was dissolved c.1915 including several noted buildings of the University of Southern California, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, Los Angeles City Hall, the Alexandria Hotel, Castle Green, the Brewery and Union Station. Edwin Bergstrom would go on to design the Hollywood Bowl, the Pasadena Civic Center, and the Pentagon in Washington. The stately Bilike Mansion was one of their first joint ventures, located at 699 Monterey Road in South Pasadena, California.
  • Beverly Hills City Hall, Koerner & Gage 1932
    With a few hours to spare this afternoon, we made the short trek to Beverly Hills on a mission to photograph the Spanish Baroque style Beverly Hills City Hall designed by Harry G. Koerner and William Gage. Perhaps not feeling the pinch as might be expected in less affluent neighborhoods, the good citizens of Beverly Hills had their civic treasure completed in 1932, at the height of the Great Depression, and four years after designing my personal residence in Los Feliz, the Durex Model Home 'La Casa Contenta' completed in 1928.

    Three years after completing the landmark city hall, Harry Koerner died of a sudden heart attack on February 27, 1935, 14 hours after being feted as the Guest of Honor at a dinner at the Victor Hugo Cafe; he was only 54 years old. William Gage continued the practice for several more years; he eventually retired and passed away on September 28, 1965 at the age of 74.

    Located at 455 N Rexford Drive, Beverly Hills, California.


  • Beverly Hills 76 Station- Gin Wong, Pereira Associates, Architect 1965
    According to the Los Angeles Conservancy, Beverly Hills only gas station was originally intended to be used as a symbol for the entry to Los Angeles International Airport, as counterpoint to the Theme Building. The futuristic, sweeping canopy reflects the optimism of the era and remains an outstanding tribute to the influence of the automobile on the Southern California lifestyle.

    The Beverly Hills 76 Station is located on the corner of Little Santa Monica Blvd. and Crescent Drive in Beverly Hills.
  • Beverly Center, Welton Becket Associates 1982
    The immense retail center, judged by many observers to be a lost opportunity architecturally-speaking, is nonetheless a popular shopping destination in West Hollywood. Located at 8500 Beverly Boulevard.

  • Bergren House, John Lautner 1951
    Architect John Lautner designed the Bergen House in 1951. The house has recently (September 2012) been listed for sale for $1,495,000. The two bedroom, two bath 1,582 sq. ft. home is described in the listing as 'sited to perfectly capture city and mountain views, the sleek, sexy published showpiece has been recently updated while keeping the architect's original mid-century design and integrity. The stylistic open forum allows for the expression of angles and corners with gorgeous concrete floors, slate accents in both bathrooms, stainless steel Poliform kitchen with Gaggenau and Sub Zero appliances. A unique tranquil setting, perfect to enjoy the best of the Southern California lifestyle'.

    Located at 7316 Caverna Drive in the Hollywood Hills of Los Angeles, California.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • Bent Spaulding House c.1896
    Sycamore Terrace began developing in the 1890s as a collection of Craftsman style homes. For a time, the street was known as “Faculty or Professor's Row”; the original Occidental Hall of Letters was located here before the campus relocated to Eagle Rock. Some sources give the design date as 1896; others 1905. The house is owned by Architect Richard Barron. Located at 4925 North Sycamore Terrace in the Highland Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Benjamin Jarvis House, Louis Kwiatkowski, Architect c.1896
    A two-and-one-half story, 2,400 square-foot Colonial Revival house designed by architect Louis Kwiatkowski and built in 1895. The house is an example of the Colonial Revival style featuring a gabled roof, with two cross gables extending from either side at the location of
    two projecting two-story bays. The front porch has a hipped roof supported by Tuscan
    columns, a simple wood railing and a dentiled fascia with an Arroyo stone foundation.
    Above the front door is and leaded and stained glass transom with the number 531 in a stylized font. Located at 531 North Raymond Avenue in Pasadena, California. The property is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Ben Platt Residence, Paul R. Williams, Architect 1926 & Albert E. Hansen (1929)

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    The house has a fascinating history, not too surprising given its grandeur. Originally designed for Rudolph Rosenberg by Architect Harley S. Bradley, the home was purchased in the same year by music store magnate Ben Platt. Platt hired Paul R. Williams to enlarge the house, adding an additional story. In 1929, Platt embellished the house again, hiring architect Albert E. Hansen to add a swimming pool, tennis court, garden house and pergola. The next owner was con man C.C. Julian. The Julian Petroleum scandal exposed the speculative mania of the times and the greed of certain individuals (much like the Bernard Madoff's of today's generation) that eventually led to the stock market crash of 1929 and its devastating aftermath. Julian arrived in Los Angeles in 1922 shortly after oil was discovered in the communities of Long Beach, Huntington Beach and Santa Fe Springs. Securing a lease to drill oil in Santa Fe Springs, he launched a clever scheme, portraying himself as the 'champion of the small investor, battling against big oil and the corporate moguls' in colorful advertisements in the Los Angeles Times. After each of his first five wells hit gushers, money poured in quickly. He launched Julian Petroleum Corporation in 1923, promising the venture would supplant Standard Oil. In 56 days, he sold $5 million worth of stock. During his brief fame, Julian emerged as one of the most colorful figures in Los Angeles. His lavish mansion in Los Feliz, along with his flamboyant wardrobe, attractive female companions and fleet of luxury cars and a well-publicized nightclub row with Charlie Chaplin probably led to his undoing. Suspecting fraudulent activity, the California corporations commissioner launched several investigations into his activities.

    The Julian Petroleum crash revealed a web of corruption, contributing to the collapse of the First National Bank, the election of former Ku Klux Klansman John Porter as Mayor, and the defeat of Governor C.C. Young in his bid for re-election. More drama unfolded, including the courtroom assassination of a banker, a blackmail plot involving the city's best-known reporter and the double murder of gangster Charlie Crawford and a newspaper editor by a candidate for municipal court judge. C.C. Julian committed suicide in a hotel room in 1934.
  • Beehive, Eric Owen Moss, Architect 2000
    The face of Culver City dramatically changed with the arrival of Eric Owen Moss in the late 1980s. The architect has enlivened the cityscape by renovating old buildings with avant-garde architecture in a derelict warehouse district and in the process, transformed a formerly urban wasteland into high tech art and enterprise. Located at 8520 National Boulevard.
  • Beckman Institute
    The Beckman Institute is the largest building on the campus of the California Institute of Technology (Cal Tech). The institute brings together scientist from a variety of disciplines who have similar research interests. Here theorists interact with experimentalists, biologists with chemists and physicists. The building is also home to the Institute's archives and the Beckman Room, containing exhibits about the history of chemistry and the contributions of Cal Tech alumnus Arnold Beckman.

    The Cal Tech campus is located at 1200 E California Boulevard in Pasadena, California.
  • Beckman Auditorium, Edward D. Stone, Architect 1963
    Designed by Edward Durell Stone (1902 - 1978), the architect began his architectural studies at the University of Arkansas, where his interest in architecture was encouraged by the chairman of the art department. His older brother, James Hicks Stone (1886–1928), was already a practicing architect in Boston, Massachusetts, who encouraged him to join him there. While in Boston, Stone attended the Boston Architectural Club (now Boston Architectural College), Harvard University, and MIT, and apprenticed in the offices of Coolidge, Shepley, Bulfinch and Abbott, (successor firm to H.H. Richardson).

    He went to work for the firm Schultze & Weaver In New York City in 1929, designing the main lobby and grand ballroom of the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel, before moving to the offices of Reinhardt, Hoffmeister, Hood & Fouilhoux, who were among the architects associated on the Rockefeller Center project. Stone was the principal designer on the Radio City Music Hall, where he worked with Donald Deskey, the project's interior designer. His relationship with Deskey ultimately led to his first independent commission in 1933 for Richard Mandel, for whom he designed a modernist home in Mt. Kisco, a startling volumetric composition, with elements suggestive of the European modernists Erich Mendelsohn and Le Corbusier.

    Other important commissions followed, including the New York Museum of Modern Art, El Panama Hotel in Panama City (1946); Fine Arts Center, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas (1948);
    United States Embassy, New Delhi, India (1954); Stanford Medical Center, Palo Alto, California (1955); Stuart Pharmaceutical Co., Pasadena, California (1956); National Geographic Society Building, Washington, District of Columbia (1961); Busch Memorial Stadium, St. Louis, Missouri (1962); Florida State Capitol, Tallahassee, Florida (1977); University of Alabama School of Law, Tuscaloosa, Alabama (1977) and many others.

    Beckman Auditorium, on the campus of the California Institute of Technology, is an excellent example of the architect's Expressionist style. The auditorium conveys the intended effect of a tent pavillion. Located at 1200 E. California Boulevard in Pasadena, California.
  • Bebe Daniels Residence c.1915
    Prairie style originally built for H. Otto Kircher in 1915, the house became the home of silent film star Bebe Daniels in the 1920s. Prairie style homes are rare in Los Angeles; they first appeared in the suburbs of Chicago between 1905 and 1915. They were designed by a creative group of architects led by Frank Lloyd Wright and came to be known as the Prairie School.

    Bebe Daniels began her career as a child actress, became a star in musicals like 42nd Street. She appeared in over 230 films throughout her career, beginning in 1910 and lasting until 1955..

    Located at 2326 Cromwell Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Beaton House 'La Casa Contenta'Harry G. Koerner and William J. Gage c.1929








    Los Angeles Historian Charles E. Fisher, on a recent visit to the house speculated that the Spanish Revival style house may be the work of Architect George Wyman, most noted for the design of the Bradbury Building. The house was built by Durex Quality Homes, a division of the F.P. Fay Company, headquartered at the Third and Hill F.P. Fay Building, where, according to Charles Fisher, George Wyman kept his office, a stone's throw from the Bradbury Building. In the process of investigating the history of the house, Fisher discovered that the house was designed by Harry G. Koerner and William J. Gage, best known for the design of the Beverly Hills City Hall in 1932. Koerner and Gage had been retained by the F. P. Fay Company to design homes for the Durex company. 'The reason I thought of George Wyman was because he had designed the Downtown Los Angeles office building for the Fay Company, which was demolished a few years ago', Fisher said.

    When the home was built in 1929, Durex was already a thirty-year old company founded in 1899. A 1929 sales brochure calls the home, 'The Home of Your Dreams', recalling the days of the Dons, when ranchos stretched from the mountain to the sea, when life was leisurely and the end of the day of sheep-shearing meant 'Fiesta'. (It was apparently a model home; the brochure further indicates that the house was 'staged' by the Broadway's Home Furnishing Studio).

    The home became the property of the Beaton family at some point in time. William Beaton was President and Chairman of the Board of KIEV AM Radio from 1961 until his death in 1985. Beaton's two sons, Fred and Ron, took control of the station after their father's death. I purchased the home from the Beaton family in 1992 and renamed it 'La Casa Contenta' in 2010; the house is the 'Home of My Dreams.'

    Located at 3410 Amesbury Road in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Beard House, Richard Neutra, Architect 1934-35
    For William and Melba Beard, an all-steel house was the ideal material for a home in the foothills of Altadena, a hillside community in the San Gabriel valley, an area succeptible to wind and fire. Steel also provided the advantage of being naturally termite resistant. In the house, Neutra introduced (perhaps for the first domestic application) commercial ball-bearing steel and glass doors; other innovations included special glass to reduce heat and glare and radiantly heated floors.

    Early photographs (by Julius Shulman) show a slightly different facade. The garage door, seen on the right, was originally recessed, providing a more appealing facade. Subsequent owners, apparently for practical purposes, must have moved the garage door outwards to provide more space. (Neutra was a great artist, but not always a practical one).

    The Beard House is located in Altadena, at 1981 Meadowbrook Road. Special thanks to Neutra Scholar Barbara Lamprecht, a personal friend and author 'Richard Neutra: Complete Works'. Her knowledge and enthusiasm are an inspiration!
  • Beachwood Market Expansion, John Lautner, Architect 1954








    The original market is next door, designed in a Spanish Mediterranean style. The owners selected John Lautner to design this contemporary addition in 1954, suiting the eclectic architecture of the surrounding neighborhood.

    Located at 2699 Beachwood Drive in the Hollywood Hills.
  • Beach-Johnson House c.1900
    The Beach-Johnson House, also known as the Arroyo Stone House was built in 1900 with stones gathered from the riverbed of the nearby Arroyo Seco. The house is located on historic Sycamore Terrace in the Highland Park neighborhood of Los Angeles. The original Occidental College Hall of Letters was located on the street until 1912, when the school moved to Eagle Rock. During the Occidental College years, the street was known as “Faculty or Professor's Row. The Beach-Johnson House and its Arroyo stone wall were designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1988 (No. 373). Located at 4939 North Sycamore Terrace in the Highland Park neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Bay Cities Garage (Continuum) Frank Israel 1990
    The brick warehouse has served many firms over the years, including Charles and Ray Eames, who from 1943 until 1988 shared the space with Evans Products Company, their collaborators on the design of molded plastic products.

    After Ray Eames death in 1988, the building was acquired by the design firm, Keith Bright and Associates who commissioned architect Frank Israel to re-design the interior space to fit their requirements, leaving the original brick walls and truss ceilings exposed.
  • Bates House, 1415 Carroll Avenue
    Designated an Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles in 1988 (No. 399), the Bates House was originally located at 1425 West Pico Blvd. It was relocated to 725 S. Bernal Avenue in 1921 and moved to its present location in 1988. The home is noted for the unique sunburst design of its gables (and also in the doors to the crawl spaces).
  • Batchelder House, Ernest A. Batchelder 1909, 1913
    Ernest A. Batchelder (1875–1957) was an artist-educator best known as a maker of art tiles and as a leader in the American Arts and Crafts Movement. He came to California in the early 1900s to direct the art department at Throop Polytechnic Institute, (forerunner of the California Institute of Technology). In 1909 he built a kiln in the backyard of this house and began creating hand made ceramic tiles. By the 1920s the tiles could be found in homes in every corner of the United States.

    The Batchelder House where he set up his first kiln, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The current owner of the house is Dr. Robert Winter, Arthur G. Coons Professor of the History of Ideas, Emeritus at Occidental College, where he taught for over 30 years. Now retired, Winter wrote the book 'Batchelder: Tilemaker'. The house has been designated as a future gift to Occidental College. Located at 626 S. Arroyo Blvd. in the Lower Arroyo Seco neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • Barry Berkus Residence, Barry Berkus, B3 Architects 1965
    Renowned architect Barry Berkus designed the house as a personal residence for his family in 1965. The redwood and glass house is situated in a sylvan setting in La Cañada Flintridge, a small and affluent community in the foothills northeast of Glendale, California. The house most recently (2007) sold for $3.45M. Located at 4305 Woodleigh Lane.

    Barry Berkus is the founder and President of B3 Architects and Berkus Design Studio. Architectural Digest named Berkus as one of the top 100 architects in the world; Builder Magazine has named him one of the 100 most influential individuals in the past century of American housing.
  • Barlow House, Wallace Neff, Architect 1923-24.
    Neff designed th villa for the wife of Dr. James Barlow, who invisioned a replica of the Villa Callazzi outside Florence. The photo is from the southern cortile of the villa, with views of the San Gabriel Valley below.

    Located at the nirtheast corner of Michillinda Street and HIghland Avenue in Sierra Madre.
  • Barbara Bestor House, Barbara Bestor, Architect 2007
    Architect Barbara Bestor has been making a splash in recent years in the architecture and design communities in and around Los Angeles: The multi-tasking mother of two is on a fast track, leaving her mark on seemingly everything she undertakes. Her work might be referred to as 'chic Bohemian', infusing practicality with high design.

    Her recent book, 'BOHEMIAN MODERN: Living in Silver Lake' (Regan Books, 2006) reveals a great deal about her style: a trip down memory lane with a collection of stories about her local work and the friends she has met along the way.

    Following in the footsteps of the great Modernist masters, Bestor selected a site directly across the street from the Frank Lloyd Wright-designed Ennis House and two doors down the street from the Richard Neutra-designed Wirin House to build a new residence for herself and her two daughters. German Photographer Martin Schall (you-are-here.com) and I paid a visit in October 2008. The house is open and spacious on three levels, infused with bright colors and bathed in light. A private pool in the front courtyard is screened off from the massive wall of the Ennis House across the street.

    The Barbara Bestor Residence is located at 2612 Glendower Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • BankAmericard Center, Edward D. Stone 1975
    Architect Edward D. Stone (1902-1978) designed the computer center for the Bank of America in 1975; the windowless (except for the lobby floor) pink marble edifice occupies an entire city block at 101 S. Marengo Avenue in Pasadena, California. Stone graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After graduation, he landed work with an architectural consortium that designed the Rockefeller Center. He opened his own office in New York in 1935 that operated continuously until 1978, designing the Museum of Modern Art (1937-1939).

    After landing a commission for the design of the Stanford University Hospital, he opened an office in Palo Alto and designed a host of important buildings in California and elsewhere including Harvey Mudd College, City of Palo Alto Public Library (1957-58); Eisenhower Hospital, Rancho Mirage (1970); Strub, Charles H., Theatre and Communications Art Center at Loyola Marymount University (1963); Campus Plan for Harvey Mudd College (1956); Stuart Pharmaceutical Company, Edward D. Stone, Architect 1957-58; California Institute of Technology Beckman Auditorium (1963); Von KleinSmid Center of International & Public Affairs at the University of Southern California amongst many others.
  • Bank Building, 5620 Hollywood Blvd., John & Donald Parkinson, Architects 1931
    Looking very much like a scale model of the Empire State Building, the former bank building near the corner of Hollywood Blvd. and Gramercy Place was used as a movie theater in the film 'L.A. Confidential'. It currently houses the offices of a film production company.
  • Aztec Hotel, Robert Stacy-Judd, Architect c.1925
    The Aztec Hotel is a rare example of Mayan Revival architecture designed by Robert Stacy-Judd, in 1924. The commission was Stacy-Judd's first in America; His prior work included the design of Egyptian-themed theaters in England, incorporating abstract patterns inspired by Mayan hieroglyphs. The Aztec represents a revivalist style popular during the 1920s, incorporating Maya architecture with art deco and Spanish Colonial Revival influences.

    Other Stacy-Judd commissions in Southern California include the First Baptist Church in Ventura, the Masonic Temple in North Hollywood, the Philosophical Research Society in Los Feliz and the Atwater Bungalows in Elysian Park.The Aztec Hotel was designated a National Historic Landmark and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. Located at 311 W. Foothill Blvd. in the City of Monrovia, California.

  • Auto Club of Southern California, Sumner P. Hunt & Silas R. Burns, Architects 1922
    The Auto Club of Southern California was designed by architect Sumner P. Hunt in the Spanish Colonial Revival style with landscaping by Roland E. Coate in 1922; the building now serves as the district office.for the organization. The firm was an early advocate for the construction of the Ridge Route, the first highway through the Tehachapi Mountains and San Gabriel Mountains, which directly linked Los Angeles to Bakersfield and the Central Valley. The route saved the State of California from being split into two separate states. The Club began surveying the state's roads for the purpose of map-making beginning in 1910; the production of which created a uniform system.
    The Auto Club placed thousands of traffic signs throughout the state up until the 1950s, after which the state took over the responsibility. The signs were manufactured by a local fabricator of bathtubs. The original porcelain-on-steel signs are a rarity today.

    The Auto Club was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1971 (No. 72). Located at 2601 S. Figueroa Street in the West Adams district of Los Angeles.
  • August Winstell Residence, John Paul Krempel, Architect 1907
    The August Winstel Residence is a 'relatively unaltered example' of Tudor Revival style architecture located at 1147 S. Alvarado Street in the Pico-Union Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ) of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 328) in 1987. It currently operates as the Alcoholism Center for Women, established in 1974 to address the special needs of women affected by alcohol and other drug abuse.
  • Audrey Irmas House, Timothy Morgan Steele, Architect 1994
    In 1994 Audrey Irmas chose Santa Barbara-based architect Timothy Morgan Steele to design a gallery-as-home for her collection of contemporary art. Irmas is a lifetime trustee of Los Angeles' Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA); besides her work on behalf of the museum, her philanthropic work extends to many Jewish causes.

    The 11,000 sq. ft. home is located at 595 Mapleton Drive, in the exclusive Holmby Hills enclave. It is currently listed for sale at a cool $16.9M (the price was dropped from $25M in January 2009; as of May 2009, there were six homes listed for sale on Mapleton, ranging in price from $16.9M to $25M, reflecting current market conditions)

  • Arts Building, Steven Ehrlich 1988
    One of three buildings designed by architect Steven Ehrlich that ring the Windward Circle, a focal point in the history of Venice Beach, California; turn-of-the-century buildings originally stood here at the foot of a watery lagoon. As a whole, the circle has seen better days; one can only hope that it will be spruced up in the near future.
  • Artemesia c.1913
    Craftsman style mansion built in 1913 and one of the largest of its style ever built (over 13,000 sq. ft.). The original owner was Franz Otto Engstrum (1848-1920), a wealthy Swedish immigrant who wanted to built a house that celebrated his status. From immigrant stonemason to major building contractor (he developed one of the first major apartment complexes in Los Angeles as well as the luxurious Rosslyn Hotel in downtown Los Angeles), Ensgstrum was a man ahead of the times. Engstrum would implement the latest environmental and technological developments in the construction of his home, including a rainwater collection system, which supplied the bathroom showers; the resulting gray water was recycled in the garden. Building material for the hillside home was transported via the nearby Pacific Electric Short Line Railroad. A tankless water heater fired only upon use, an early energy saver. He also installed an electronic intercom and central vacuum system. In 1917 ownership of the house passed to Mrs. Mary Costello. Her son, John Martin Costello (1903-1976) was a New Deal Congressman, elected to the 74th Congress and four succeeding congresses between 1935 and 1945. He also served as general counsel and manager of the Washington office of the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce from 1945 to 1947. Later, the house passed to the Hamberger family, scions of the department store chain that was later sold to the May Company. The house is located at 5771 Valley Oak Drive in the Los Feliz Oaks.
  • Art Center College of Design South Campus, Daly Gerik Architects 2004
    When Pasadena's Art Center College of Design needed more space, they found it in a former wind tunnel testing facility, located at 950 S. Raymond Avenue. The architect brought light into the studios and galleries with the additon of skylights and light wells.
  • Arroyo Seco Bank Building, Austin & Ashley 1926
    Renaissance Revival style bank designed by the firm Austin and Ashley in 1926. Located at 6301 North Figueroa Street in the historic Garvanza district of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 492) in 1990.
  • Ard Eevin, Nathaniel Dryden, Architect c.1902







    Historic Ard Eevin, the original manor house for a citrus ranch continuously owned by the family and heirs of Daniel McPeak Campbell, an early Glendale Pioneer, banker, developer and philanthropist. The house is described as a 'turn of the century transitional' style, incorporating elements of the American Colonial Revival. The house was designed by society architect Nathaniel Dryden, who also designed the nearby Moorish castle 'El Miradero' for Leslie Brand.

    Located at 851 West Mountain Street in Glendale, California.
  • Arcadia Public Library, William Guy Garwood 1961; Charles Walton Associates, Renovation & Expansion
    Architect William Guy Garwood designed the library with no visible windows on the facade; instead
    the windows were installed behind patio walls. The library was upgraded and expanded and brought into compliance with more stringent safety requirements. The project was undertaken by Architect Charles Walton & Associates and completed in November 1996. Located at 20 W. Duarte Road in Arcadia, California.
  • Arcadia Police Station, Steve Wiley, WMM Associates Architects 2003
    The contemporary style Arcadia Police Station was designed by WMM Associates Architects with associate Steve Wiley as Architect of Record. Wiley worked in association with architect Anthony 'Tony' Lumsden as design consultant. The two became acquainted at the Cal Poly Pomona School of Environmental Design where Lumsden was on the architecture faculty and a mentor to Wiley.. The firm submitted three varying design proposals to the city, which in turn selected the progressive design shown here. Tentative plans were underway to transform the entire civic center with similar architecture, however budget restraints have put any further development on hold. In the meantime, the forward-looking architecture seems to have fallen out of favor.

    Located at 250 W. Huntington Drive in Arcadia, California.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved
  • Arcadia News Journal Building c.1932
    The art deco style building was built in about 1932 and originally housed the Arcadia News Journal, according to a plaque on the building's facade. The relief sculptures on the upper left were designed by J. J. Mora. Located at 53 Huntington Drive in downtown Arcadia, California.
  • Apartment Building, 4230 Franklin Avenue, J. Knover, Architect 1939
    The thirties marked the high-water mark of the Streamline Moderne movement; this handsome apartment building in Los Feliz incorporates the signature elements of the style, including porthole windows, curving rooflines wth matching ship style railings, and horizontal bands of windows.
  • Anthony House, Greene & Greene 1909-1923
    Automobile dealer Earle C. Anthony who dominated the luxury car market in Los Angeles during the Roaring 20s with multiple Packard dealerships, had the distinguished architectural firm of Charles and Henry Greene design the Craftsman style residence beginning in 1909. After Charles Greene sold his Packard and purchased a Hudson, Anthony had San Francisco architect Bernard Maybeck design a medieval castle for him in Los Feliz where he moved in 1927.

    The Anthony House is located at 910 North Bedford Drive in Beverly Hills, California. It originally stood at the corner of Wilshire and Berendo and has been sensitively restored by its current owners.

  • Angelus Temple- A.F. Leicht, Architect 1923
    The mother church of the International Church ot the Foursquare Gospel, founded by Aimee Semple McPherson. Originally, the church had a 5,300 seating capacity, well-suited for the huge crowds that the pentacostal evangelist atttracted during the denomination's early years. The concrete temple is designed in a classical style; Roman arch windows interspersed between Doric columns and a shallow dome are its most prominent features.

    The church was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1992; it is located at 1100 Glendale Blvd. in Echo Park, across the street from Echo Park Lake.
  • Angels Flight, Merceau Bridge & Construction Co.; Train & Williams c.1901
    The Beaux Arts style Angels Flight is an historic narrow gauge funicular railway which began service in 1901. It was built with financing provided by Colonel J.W. Eddy, an engineer-lawyer and friend of Abraham Lincoln., lawyer, engineer and friend of President Abraham Lincoln.

    The original railway, at the time known as the Los Angeles Incline Railway, was undoubtedly one of the shortest, running from its base at Hill Street to a terminus two blocks uphill at Olive Street. The concept consisted of two counterbalanced rail cars, the Sinai and Olivet; while one was being pulled uphill by metal cables, the other descended by the forces of gravity.

    The railway operated at its original location up until 1969 when it was shut down to make room for the redevelopment of Bunker Hill, and reopened at a new location in 1996, connecting Olive with Hill Street and the Grand Central Market. Since then the railway has had a checkered history due to aging components and flaws in the redesigned system. It is currently closed.
    Angels Flight was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 4) in 1962. In 2000, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. Located at 351 S. Hill Street in downtown Los Angeles.
  • Angeles National Forest Park Headquarters, Beverly Pryor 2012
    The Supervisors Office Building was designed in the Craftsman style by the San Francisco-based firm Beverly Pryor Architects and completed in 2012. The facility includes a 24,000 square foot two story main building and an existing historic warehouse that was renovated and is now used as a conference and training center.

    The project is designed to the LEED Gold standard, providing an energy-efficient working environment through the use of daylighting, ventilation, recycled and renewable materials, energy-efficient lighting and building systems and water saving fixtures. Landscaping features include a “fire-safe” demonstration garden and cultivation of over 80 plants selected from the forest itself. Natural and native stone and other rocks are used as barriers and site control.


    Located at 1701 North Santa Anita Avenue in Arcadia, California.
  • Andy Anderson House, Andy Anderson 1937-38
    The Pueblo Revival style house was built and designed by Craftsman Andy Anderson for his personal residence. Located at 22912 Bluebird Way in Calabasas, California.
  • Andrew McNally House, Frederick L. Roehrig 1888
    Architect Frederick L. Roehrig designed the towering Queen Anne style house in 1888 as a winter home for Andrew McNally, an Irish immigrant and printer by trade. In 1858 he moved from New York City to Chicago, and got a job in a print shop owned by William Rand. Demonstrating his worth, he became partners with Rand in 1868, forming Rand McNally & Company, one of the largest map publishing companies in the world. After Rand retired in 1899, McNally was president until his unexpected death from pneumonia in 1904 at the home.

    The McNally House is located at 654 E. Mariposa Street in the foothill community of Altadena, California. The house is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.

    Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • Ames Residence, George Ames, Pereira Associates 1951
    George Ames, Senior Vice President at Pereira & Associates, a major architectural firm designed and built the 2 bedroom, 2 bath house in 1571 sq. ft. in Glendale, so that he and his wife, a graduate of Glendale High School could start a family and raise them in her hometown. The house recently (October 2013) came on the market listed for sale for $799,000, and described in the listing, '..a serene setting, up on a knoll with views of the Los Angeles skyline. It is pretty much as the architect designed it in 1951. Stepping through the front door is stepping back in time. Original windows, and doors, clean lines, walls of glass, all typical design features of the period. This home is a real treat to view, and with a lot that is 16, 379 sf, there is so much potential here'.

    Located at 1558 Glenmont Drive in the Brockment neighborhood of Glendale, California.
  • American Storage Company Tower, Arthur E. Harvey, Architect 1928-1929
    This early 'skyscraper' from the late twenties is only fourteen stories, but seems higher due to the thinness of the tower's columns. The tower is art deco in design; however the horizontal base and the capitals of the tower's vertical elements have a rich Spanish ornamentation.

    Chris Nichols, Associate Editor of 'Los Angeles Magazine' reports in the February 2009 edition that the building was proclaimed 'the most beautiful storage building in the world' when it opened in 1928....a celestial-themed speakeasy--where waiters sporting make-believe wings served booze--commanded the top floor until the end of Prohibition.'

    The American Storage Company Tower is located at 3636 N. Virgil Avenue north of MacArthur Park and south of Silver Lake.
  • American Academy of Dramatic Arts
    Founded in 1884, the American Academy of Dramatic Arts celebrated its 125th Anniversary in 2009. From its beginning in New York, and, since 1974, to its acting school in Los Angeles, the Academy has established itself as the 'Cradle to the Stars' because of its famous alumni which includes Spencer Tracy, Edward G. Robinson, Rosalind Russell, Kirk Douglas, Lauren Bacall, Jason Robards, Robert Redford, Danny Devito, John Cassavetes, Gena Rowlands, Anne Bancroft, Cleavon Little and Grace Kelly.

    Located at 1336 N. La Brea Avenue in Hollywood, California.
  • Amelia Earhart-North Hollywood Branch Library, Weston & Weston 1929
    The Spanish Colonial Revival style library was designed by the father and son team of Lewis Eugene Weston and Lewis Eugene Weston Jr. in 1927. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 302) in 1986.

    Located at 5211 North Tujunga Avenue in North Hollywood, California.
  • Alvin N. Dunn Residence, J.A. Murray, Architect 1928
    Architect J.A. Murray designed the house for Alvin M.Dunn, president of the Dunn-Edwards Paint Company, a family-owned business started in 1925. Film and television producer, director and actor Harold Eugene 'Hal' Roach, Sr. (1892 –1992) also owned the house for a time.

    The five bedroom, seven bath house is currently (January 2013) on the market and.listed for sale for $3,950,00. Described in the listing as 'Meticulously renovated & restored, the sprawling Spanish Colonial Revival style house is situated on a street-to-street lot on one of Los Feliz's premier streets. The house has a 2-story grand entrance with original iron work, over-sized formal living room banked with French doors leading out to front & rear courtyards. The home was featured on the cover of California Home and Design magazine. The architect also designed an English Tudor style residence for Dr. William C. Duncan on Lowry Road in the same year.

    The Alvin N. Dunn Residence is located at 2408 Nottingham Avenue in Los Feliz.
  • Alphonse J. Forget Residence, Robert Brown Young, Architect 1890
    The South Bonnie Brae Tract Historic District is a historic district of Victorian houses in Los Angeles, California, between the 1000 block of South Bonnie Brae Street and the 1800 block of West Eleventh Street, in the Pico Union Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ) section of the city of Los Angeles.. The homes in the district date from the 1890s and reflect Queen Anne and Colonial Revival architecture. Based on its well-preserved period architecture, the district was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. The Alphonse J. Forget House is a classic example of the Queen Anne Victorian style. The house is located at 1026 S. Bonnie Brae Street. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1989 (No. 433).
  • Alfred J. Salisbury Residence, Bradbeer & Ferris 1891


    The architectural firm of Bradbeer & Ferris designed the elegant Queen Anne Victorian in 1891. In 1897 it became the Cumnock School of Oratory, though it was later converted back into a private home.

    Located at 2703 South Hoover Street in the North University Park National Register Historic District. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 240) in 1981.
  • Alex Theater, Arthur G. Lindley & Charles R. Selkirk, Architects 1940
    Originally opened in 1925 as the Alexander Theater, the name was shortened during a 1940 redesign to fit larger letters on a new marquee. The theater was named after Alexander Langley, whose father, C.L. Langley owned a chain of theaters on the west coast. The enclosed courtyard was modeled after Sid Grauman's Egyptian Theater in Hollywood. Classical Greek and Egyptian elements highlighted by massive Doric columns and a frieze of Ptolemaic Egyptian dancers and musicians above the architrave dominate. Some memorable movies held their premieres at the Alex. In 1944, both National Velvet and Going My Way opened here. Alice Faye, Don Ameche, Elizabeth Taylor and Bing Crosby were among the invited celebrities.

    The Alex Theater is located at 216 N. Brand Boulevard in Glendale, CA. It is on the National Register of Historic Places.
  • Alex Theater Marquee & Tower, S. Charles Lee, Architect 1940
    In 1940, noted theater architect S. Charles Lee was commissioned to revamp the exterior of the Alexander Theater , installing a 100' tall neon tower topped with a starburst sphere and new marquee. The name of the theater was shortened to the 'Alex' to accommodate the larger letters. The art-deco tower and marquee represent the most significant 'postcard symbols' of Glendale and have been enshrined in the National Register of Historic Places .

    The Alex Theater is located at 216 North Glendale Blvd. in Glendale, California.
  • Albert Brown Residence, Meyer & Holler (Milwaukie Building Company), Architects 1921








    Prolific architectural and home-building firm Milwaukie Building Company designed the English Revival style house for Albert Brown in 1921. Brown, who was born in England in 1879 lived here with his wife Margaret up until the 1940s. Meyer & Holler, also known as the Milwaukie Building Company), designed many important Los Angeles landmarks including Grauman’s Chinese and Egyptian theaters. The firm, founded by Gabriel S. Meyer and Philip W. Holler designed dozens of apartment buildings, hotels, banks, and churches between 1906 and 1932.

    Located at 2415 N. Commonwealth Avenue in the Los Feliz district of Los Angeles.
  • Alan Ladd Estate- Marshall P. Wilkinson, Architect 1928
    Georgian style residence designed by Marshall P. Wilkinson in 1928. The style flourished in northern New England during the 1700s. Sue Carol, a Hollywood actress-turned agent purchased this home with her husband Nick Stuart in 1930. In true Hollywood fashion, the agent met a rising young star, Alan Ladd, and agreed to become his agent. Ladd's career sky-rocketed in 1942; his breakthrough role came as a dispassionate killer in 'This Gun For Hire'. As Carol focused her attention on Ladd's career, the two became romantically involved, leaving their respective spouses and marrying in 1942.

    An English-style pub house 'The Silent Woman'
    located at the back of the property served as a speakeasy during Prohibition, and had a reputation for fantastic parties up until the 1950s. Many famous guests have carved their names into the pub's bar.

    The Alan Ladd Estate is located at 4961 Cromwell Avenue in the Los Feliz District of Los Angeles. It is currently listed for sale for $3,495,000.
  • Alan Ladd Estate- Marshall P. Wilkinson, Architect 1928
    From the rear, showing the steeply-pitched gambrel roof, indicative of the Georgian and Colonial Revival architectural styles that dominated architecture during most of the 18th century.
  • Alan Ladd Estate- Marshall P. Wilkinson, Architect 1928
    'The Silent Woman', an English pub behind the Alan Ladd Estate in Los Feliz. Many famous guests have carved their names into the pub's bar, including Louis Armstrong, Bette Davis, the Four Horsemen of Notre Dame, Dixie and Bing Crosby and Ginger Rogers.
  • Ahmanson Center for Biological Research (USC), William L Pereira & Associates, Architects 1964
    One of the more unusual buildings at the main campus of the University of Southern California, the Ahmanson Center for Biological Research was completed in 1964 during the time when Dr. Norman Topping was President of the University. The hooded windows of cast concrete are the signature design element of this edifice.
  • Agnes B. Heimgartner Residence 1893
    Eastlake Victorian house, the home of Agnes B. Helmgartner, located in the historic West Adams neighborhood of Los Angeles at 1962 Bonsallo Avenue. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 499) in 1990..

  • Aeroscopic Environmental, Inc., c.1935
    Detail of the extravagant Streamline Moderne entryway.
  • Aeroscopic Environmental, Inc. c. 1935
    I probably would have missed this fascinating building altogether if it not been for the resourceful book, 'An Architectural Guidebook to Los Angeles' by David Gebhard & Robert Winter. An elegant example of the Streamline Moderne in an otherwise bleak industrial zone west of San Fernando Road.

    Located at 5245 San Fernando Road West in Glendale, CA
  • Adolphe Menjou Residence, Gordon Kaufmann Architect 1927
    Architect Gordon B. Kaufmann designed the French Tudor style residence for Adolphe Menjou in 1927, a successful actor known for his sophisticated style and dapper dress. Born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on February 18, 1890, Menjou moved to New York in 1911 and found small parts in films and supporting roles. He first caught the public eye in the 1923 Charlie Chaplin film, 'A Woman in Paris', in which he played a debonair man of the world. He reprised the character in over 100 films, receiving an Oscar nomination for Best Actor in the 1931 film, 'The Front Page'. His star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame is located at 6822 Hollywood Boulevard.

    The Adolphe Menjou Residence is located at 2612 Nottingham Avenue in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles. He also had a house built for him next door, an English Tudor style home, designed by A.G. Bailey in 1934.
  • Administration Building, Los Angeles County Hospital c.1912
    Classic Vienna Secessionist design, a movement that began in 1897 and brought purer geometric forms often enhanced with linear ornamentation. The style is quite rare in the western United States. The building is currently the office of the Los Angeles County Coroner's Office.

    Located at 100 North Mission Road in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • Adlai E. Stevenson Birthplace
    Adlai Ewing Stevenson II was born in this late Queen Anne style home on February 5, 1900. He would later become a popular Illinois Governor and was twice (in 1952 and 1956) the Democratic nominee for the U.S. presidency. During the Kennedy presidency, Stevenson served as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, a position he held at the time of his death in 1965.

    The Adlai Stevenson Birthplace is located at 2639 Monmouth Avenue in the West Adams district of Los Angeles. In 1965, the home was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles (No. 35)
  • Adamson House, Stiles O. Clements, Architect 1930
    Adamson House, designed by Stiles O. Clements of the architectural firm of Morgan, Walls & Clements, completed in 1930. The ten-room house is noted for its extensive use of decorative ceramic tiles (from the nearby Malibu Potteries). Sometimes referred to as “Vaquero Hill” and the “Taj Mahal of Tile”, the house was built for Rhoda Rindge Adamson and Merritt Huntley Adamson. Adamson (1888–1949) was Captain of the 1912 USC football team, the first to be called the Trojans. He met Rhoda Rindge while employed as a foreman on the Rindge Ranch. The couple married in 1915; the following year, Adamson started Adohr Farms, a dairy business in the San Fernando Valley, which became one of the country's largest dairies. (the name 'Adohr' came from spelling his wife's name backwards).

    The property was purchased by the State of California in 1968. The Malibu Lagoon Interpretive Association was formed in 1981, re-opening the home as a museum in 1983. The house is built of steel-reinforced concrete, in the Mediterranean style, featuring hand-painted ceilings, teakwood, and extensive wrought iron. Located at 23200 W. Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu.
  • Ace Market Place, Steven Ehrlich 1989; Roy Doumani (sculptor)
    One of three buildings designed by architect Steven Ehrlich that ring the Windward Circle, a focal point in the history of Venice Beach, California; turn-of-the-century buildings originally stood here at the foot of a watery lagoon. The twin towers over the entrance are meant to suggest the dredging machines that dug up the original Venice canals. As a whole, the circle has seen better days; one can only hope that it will be spruced up in the near future. Located at 1501 Main Street in Venice Beach, California.
  • Academy Theater, S. Charles Lee c.1939
    The Academy Theater designed by famed theater designer S. Charles Lee marks a high point in the Streamline Moderne Movement. A 125 feet-high tower and marque sign are reminders of its glorious past. Located at 3100 Manchester Boulevard in Inglewood, California.
  • Abbey San Encino, Clyde Browne, Designer 1909-1925
    Clyde Browne began building his medieval abbey in 1909, reportedly using bits of discarded masonry from old ruined buildings and undoubtedly picked up some stones from the arroyo below. Browne, a printer and bibliophile, lived in the house which served as a repository for his rare book collection. His grandson, singer Jackson Browne lived here for a time; the house is now the music studio and residence of his younger brother, Severin Browne

    Browne originally called his home Oldestane Abbey. It was designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1972 (No. 106). Located at 6211 Arroyo Glen Street in the Highland Park Historic District of Los Angeles.
  • 949 Sun Mun Way c.1939; Amy Finn Bernier (Restoration) 2003-2007
    Located in Chinatown’s historic Central Plaza, the building at 949 Sun Mun Way has a colorful history dating to 1939. Madame Wong’s punk and new wave club occupied the top floor in the 1970s and ‘80s. After the club closed in 1985, the building fell into decline and suffered greatly from neglect. Architect Amy Finn Bernier and Dan Bernier purchased the property in 2003 and began adapting it for use as residential and creative office space. The restoration project brought the building back to life as lofts and storefronts; recognized with a Los Angeles Conservancy Preservation Award in 2007.
  • 917 Douglas Street c.1887
    Eastlake Victorian style house located in the historic Angelino Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles. The ornamental style is named after Charles Eastlake, known for making furniture decorated with fancy spindles. The house was declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1979 (no. 216).

    The neighborhood came into being at the height of the Southern California land boom. William W. Stilson and Everett E. Hall filed for the subdivision in 1886 on the city’s lightly populated western fringe. The elevation of the hill offered beautiful vistas and a quiet suburban atmosphere for the upper middle class. A nearby cable car line, which ran down Temple Street, then a main east-west artery to the heart of downtown served the community.

  • 904 Mayo Street c.1907
    Mt. Washington holds many surprises; I recently 'discovered' the Craftsman Chalet style home at the foot of dead-end Mayo Street, while driving up Terrace 49 on my way to visit a property in the neighborhood.

    A more dramatic view of the house can be seen from Terrace 49 just east of San Rafael Avenue. If you are traveling east on Terrace 49, look over your right shoulder as you drive towards Avenue 50. The house has nine bedrooms and three baths in 4,746 sq. ft.; it last sold in 2001 for $690,000.

    Located at 904 Mayo Street in the Mt. Washington neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • 902 West Kensington Road
    One of the many grand homes in the Angelino Heights Historic Preservation Overlay Zone that is not on the register of Historic-Cultural Monuments in Los Angeles. Built in 1909, this magnificent Queen Anne Mansion boasts 8 bedrooms and six baths in 7648 sq. feet of living space. It has had some of the best Christmas decorations on the eastside in recent years.
  • 885 S. El Molino Avenue, Arthur & Alfred Heineman c.1911
    Craftsman style residence located in the Oak Knoll neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • 854 West Adams Boulevard
    It is always a cause for joy to see one of these grand old homes rescued and renovated to its original condition. This stately Victorian era home is undergoing extensive renovation (2005). Built in 1898, the home is grand with 8 bedrooms and 6 baths in 9098 sq. feet of living space. It was purchased in 2004 at a cost of $1.3 million dollars and is an excellent candidate for monument status.
  • 8500 Melrose, Albert C. Martin & Associates 1985
    Constructed of black granite and white marble at a cost of $5 million, 8500 Melrose was intended to compete with the nearby highly-successful Pacific Design Center. Conceived at a time when non-descript min-malls dominated the landscape, the black-and-white checkerboard, pink-trimmed building makes a bold statement on the corner of Melrose Avenue and La Cienega. Nevertheless it has never received much appreciation and has struggled to attract high-end tenants.

  • 826 South Coronado Street








    I had about an hour to kill before attending a meeting at First Congregational Church of Los Angeles. I went on a mini-search, looking for some examples of iconic Los Angeles architecture in the area. The Queen Anne located at 826 S. Coronado Street is a rare example of the 'Caribbean' style, seldom seen in the western U.S. Originally the house was located at 633 West 15th Street.

    Declard a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1976 (No. 167).
  • 824 East Kensington Road
    This eye-catching gingerbread beauty was built in 1894 for contractor Z.H. Weller. It originally stood at Boyston and Angelina Streets, an area where oil was discovered in the early 20th Century. With the proliferation of oil wells, the house was moved to its location in the Angelino Heights in 1909.

    This Queen Anne Classic also has Eastlake and Moorish influences. It was established as a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1979 (No. 223).
  • 805 S. Madison Avenue, Frederick L Roehrig, Architect c.1907
    Prolific architect Frederick L. Roehrig designed the Craftsman style residence in 1907.
  • 803 North Mansfield Avenue, W. Sidney Orme 1937
    Streamline Moderne Style duplex designed by architect W. Sidney Orme in 1937. The property recently (October 2013) came on the market listed for sale for $1,495,000. Each of the two units are approximately 1600 sq.ft. and feature three bedrooms, two baths, living room fireplace, porthole windows, hardwood floors, deco tile, original built-in shelving nooks, hardwood floors and authentic period fixtures.

    Located at 803 North Mansfield Avenue in the Melrose District of Los Angeles, California.
  • 700 Palms Residence, Steven Ehrlich, Architect 2003
    Ehrlich Architects is one of the hottest young firms on the architectural scene in Southern California. Founded in 1979, the firm has received eight National AIA awards and the 'Firm of the Year' Award in 2003 from the AIA California Council.

    The 700 Palms Residence is a showcase of Ehrlich design. The wood-and-steel frame structure is designed for flexible use; a roll-down 'scrim' maximizes both light and privacy and maximizes the indoor/outdoor lifestyle most suitable to the balmy climate.
  • 655 Bradford Street, Roland Coate 1929
    Architect Roland Coate designed the Colonial Revival style house in 1929. The five bedroom, five bath house in 4,376 sq. ft. most recently (November 2000) sold for $2,295,000. Located in the Lower Arroyo Seco Historic District of Pasadena, California.
  • 607-613 South Burnside Avenue, Glenn A. Doughty, Builder 1931
    The Château Style apartment building was built by contractor-owner Glenn A. Doughty in 1931. The style is based on the architecture of wealthy families of the Loire Valley of the late fifteenth century to the early seventeenth century. Typical features include steeply-pitched roofs, elaborate towers and spires.

    Located at 607 South Burnside Avenue in the Mid-Wilshire district of Los Angeles. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 423) in 1989.


  • 575 La Loma Road, Joseph Giovannini 1906
    Craftsman style house designed by Joseph Giovannini, an architecture critic for the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner in 1906. The house was featured on the 2007 Pasadena Heritage Home Tour. The house last sold in July 2009 for $1.5M. Located at 575 La Loma Road in the Lower Arroyo Seco Historic District of Pasadena, California.
  • 570 North Raymond Avenue, Greene & Greene Architects c.1902
    The famous architects designed the Craftsman style house in 1902. The house is listed in the Pasadena Register of Historic Properties. The four bedroom, 1 bath house in 2568 sq. ft. last sold in 1967 for $14,000. My how times have changed!
  • 544 Greencraig Road Jerrold E. Lomax FAIA 1980
    Architect Jerrold Lomax was born in Los Angeles in 1927; at the age of 11 his family moved to Houston, Texas. He joined the US Navy at the end of World War II, was shipped off to Japan, where he gained a high sense of appreciation for Japanese art and architecture. Returning home, he enrolled at the University of Houston School of Architecture, where he became acquainted with the work of Craig Ellwood. In 1953 he sought out Ellwood in Los Angeles and became his sole apprentice eventually working his way up to the position of lead designer.

    The Streamline Moderne style house designed by Lomax in 1980 is located at 544 Greencraig Road in the Brentwood Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles. Please do not use this image in any media without my permission.
    © All rights reserved.
  • 5264 Los Adornos Way c.1962
    Exquisite mid-century home designed by an unknown architect c.1962. As of October 2013, the 3-bedroom, 3-bath house in 2798 sq. ft. is on the market listed for sale for $1,950,000, and described in the listing as 'incredible home offers lush landscaping and architectural distinction at every turn. Expansive walls of glass, vaulted ceilings and travertine floors highlight the grand living area. The seamless transition between the interiors and the private yard and swimming pool are further complimented by a southern position, maximizing the sunlight. The free flowing floor plan epitomizes the modern California Lifestyle. Extraordinary gourmet chef's kitchen with stainless appliances and open concept is perfect for entertaining. The impressive master suite overlooks the pool and spa and has a spacious dual bathroom. Other features include a large family room, an office space next to the kitchen, two nicely appointed bedrooms with adjacent bathrooms, and a multifaceted garage that feels like an extension of the home'.






  • 5227 Linwood Drive Paul Burkhard 1957; Gary McMurty (Remodel) 1990s
    The Streamline Moderne style residence was originally designed by Paul Burkhard in 1957 and redesigned by Gary McMurty in the 1990s. The house has many of the signature elements of the style, including porthole windows, glass block and curvilinear surfaces.

    Located at 5227 Linwood Drive in the exclusive Laughlin Park enclave, a gated community within the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, California.
  • 510 Palmetto Drive, Frederick L. Roehrig, Architect 1906
    Designed By Architect Frederick L.Roehrig In 1906. The house is currently the home of Kirk Dillman, a partner with the law firm of Hennigan, Dorman LLP. .
  • 4331 Kingswell Avenue c.1905
    The earliest remaining homes in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles date from the year 1900. In fact there are less than 550 homes still standing that were built between 1900 and 1919. The following year there was an explosion of growth with 113 homes, at least that are still around. Most of the homes were designed in the Craftsman or California Bungalow style, and were situated in the vicinity of 'Los Feliz Village', (the neighborhood directly south of Los Feliz Boulevard and north of Hollywood Boulevard) and the area designated as 'Hollywood Grove', the neighborhhood east of Canyon Drive, west of Gramercy Place, and above Franklin Avenue.

    A total of thirty-eight of the homes (including a few duplexes) are located on Kingswell Avenue in Los Feliz Village, between the 4300 and 4600 block.
  • 433 West Ellis Avenue, Edward Lind c.1940
    One of three-in-a-row speculative houses designed by Rudolph Schindler associate Edward Lind in 1940. Standing in front of the house it is quite possible to see right through the house, a signature design element of the architect.
  • 425 Mira Vista Terrace, J. Constantine Hilman, Architect c.1912








    The Craftsman style residence was designed by architect J. Constantine Hilman in 1912. The house is situated on a quiet magnolia tree-lined street in the prestigious Linda Vista area of Pasadena.
  • 4231 Scandia Way, Holtz Architecture 2013
    As the high cost of housing has pushed buyers out of Silver Lake and Echo Park, the hills of Glassell Park east of Eagle Rock Boulevard have seen some excellent architecture come into the area in recent years. Developer Simon Simitian started the trend in the late 2000s, cutting in a whole new street at College Crest Drive and building a half-dozen homes designed by Pasadena architect John Raymond Byram. More recently, developer 4Site Real Estate, builder of the Auburn 7 complex in Silver Lake, engaged Holtz Architecture to design four new architectural homes on Scandia Way a few blocks away. With adjacent vacant parcels close at hand, if they are eventually built up and designed by the same architect, the development might one day be known as the Holtz Colony.

    The four homes went on the market in July 2013 and by October, three were either sold or in escrow, in the mid 800s to mid 900s range, and were described in the listing...'Large living room with vaulted ceiling; flexible floor plan with either 3 or 4 bedrooms/den/mother-in law suite/office. 2 full bathrooms, 1-3/4 bathroom, and one 1/2 bathroom. Amazing views, walls of glass/ window system and expansive balconies make this home ideal for indoor/outdoor living. Private Walk out patio, 2 car garage with electric car plug-in outlet, central a/c, tankless hot water heater, duel low flow toilets, solar array ready, hardwood/bamboo flooring, and stained concrete. Custom designed cooks kitchen with high end appliances and plenty of counter/cabinet space'.
  • 412 Glen Holly Drive, attributed to William Kesling 1937
    Author Patrick Pascal, in his book, 'Kesling Modern Structures: Popularizing Modern Design in Southern California 1934-1962' states, 'clearly a Kesling design, but due to his criminal conviction, it may not have been built under his supervision. Records do not survive.' Located n the South Arroyo neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • 405 Mira Vista Terrace, Train and Williams, Architects 1924








    One of two 'Bavarian hunting lodges'* located on MIra Vista Terrace, designed by Train and Williams in about 1924. The architectural firm was affiliated with the Arroyo Guild of Fellow Craftsman and designed a number of homes in the area including a Craftsman house at 332 N. Avenue 66 and the Hathaway Home for Children, both located in the historic Garvanza District.
  • 3919 West Eighth Street c.1935
    The apartment building was designed in a Streamline Moderne style in 1935. Unfortunately we don't have information about the architect of record.
  • 390 South Grand Avenue, G. Lawrence Stimson 1910
    Craftsman style residence designed by G. Lawrence Stimson in 1910. Located in the historic Lower Arroyo Seco neighborhood of Pasadena, California.
  • 373 Mira Vista Terrace, Train & Williams, Architects c.1924








    One of two 'Bavarian hunting lodges'* located on MIra Vista Terrace, designed by Train and Williams in about 1924. The architectural firm was affiliated with the Arroyo Guild of Fellow Craftsman and designed a number of homes in the area including a Craftsman house at 332 N. Avenue 66 and the Hathaway Home for Children, both located in the historic Garvanza District.
  • 371-379 West Bellevue Drive, Batey-Mack Architects 1979
    Five unit condominium complex designed by San Francisco architects Batey & Mack c.1979. The style is reminiscent of the abstract forms designed by Irving J. Gill.
  • 3537 Griffith Avenue, attrib. Joseph Cather Newsom c. 1890
    Queen Anne-style home, attributed to Joseph Cather Newsom, with 'Eastlake' and 'Italianate' elements. Designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument (No,145) in 1975.

    Located at 3537 Griffin Avenue in the Lincoln Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • 3407 E. Fourth Street c.1887
    The Boyle Heights neighborhood is one of Los Angeles' oldest, connected to downtown Los Angeles by two street cars that crossed the Los Angeles River on the East First Street and East Aliso Street bridges. The Queen Anne/Eastlake cottage shown here is one of several surviving fine old houses from the era. The five bedroom, two bath house is currently (Janurary 2013) on the market and listed for sale for $339,000. Located at 3407 E, Fourth Street in the Wellington Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • 330 North Brand Blvd. Office Bulding, Gensler Architects 1982
    Gensler is one of the top architectual design firm in the world, with headquarters in San Francisco founded in 1965 by Art Gensler, James Follett, and Drue Gensler. Notable projects by the firm include the Toys 'R' Us Flagship Store located in Times Square, the CAA Building in Century City and the new Ritz-Carlton Residences at L.A. Live.
  • 3110 N. Broadway c. 1880
    In the late 19th century, Lincoln Heights was one of the most fashionable neighborhoods of Los Angeles, as evidenced by a smattering of 'painted ladies' still standing more than a century later. The Queen Anne style residence seen here is a good example. Designated a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1976 (No. 157).
  • 2703 S. Hoover Street, Bradbeer & Ferris, Architects, 1891
    Elegant Queen Anne Victorian located in the Historic West Adams District. Noted for its grand size and handsome verandas, the house has been recognized as an important civic treasure. It was declared an Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles in 1981 (No. 240).
  • 2533 West Ocean View Avenue c.1926
    Here's a real eye-catcher you might more likely find in the Normandy region of France!
  • 2419 Sichel Street, c.1887
    A Queen Anne style house dating from 1887 in remarkable appearance. The grand home has been partitioned into four apartments. Located at 2419 Sichel Street in Lincoln Heights.
  • 2403 Hill Drive, Eagle Rock c. 1925
    Hill Drive has a deserved reputation as being one of the best Streets in Eagle Rock. The Spanish Revival style house at 2403 Hill Drive is one of the most beautiful.
  • 2330 Lyric Avenue, Michael Lehrer Architect 1980
    Architect Michael Lehrer's first built project, currently (August 2012) listed for sale for $1,295,00. The house, as described in the listing 'represents a colorful play of 'wit, ornament and reference'. Paying homage to the likes of Louis Kahn, Richard Meier and Charles Moore, rhythmic windows create an exciting visual scrim, casting moving light patterns throughout layered interior spaces. A dramatic footbridge joins landscape to entry, signifying the home as castle metaphor. An efficient open plan connects kitchen, dining and living areas under tall vaulted ceilings, while partial walls define a procession of intimate, smaller spaces within the whole. Large sliding glass doors open each floor to a balcony or deck, extending the living area outside and embracing the fabulous views'.

    After graduation from Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Lehrer worked at Frank O. Gehry and Associates and other design firms before opening his own practice in Silver Lake in 1985. His designs demonstrate a reverence for light and space, grounded in the idea that beauty is the expression of human dignity; the spiritual essence of architecture. The firm has won over 60 national, state, and local design awards since 1996, including numerous honor awards from The American Institute of Architects, the Chicago Athenaeum, and the International Interior Design Association. The Water + Life Museum in Hemet, an internationally honored environmental showcase, was honored as the first LEED Platinum museum in the world. In 1999, he was elected President of the American Institute of Architects, Los Angeles, and has served as Vice Chairman of School Construction Bond Oversight Committee, responsible for upgrading 700 existing schools and the construction of new schools for the Los Angeles Unified School District. In 2004 he was elevated to the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects.

    Today Michael is President of Homeless Healthcare Los Angeles, on the Harvard Alumni Association representing the Graduate School of Design and on the Harvard Design Magazine Professional Advisory Board. He is married to Mia Lehrer, Mia Lehrer + Associates Landscape Architecture.
  • 2218 South Harvard Boulevard
    Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1973 (No. 117), this handsome American Colonial residence originally built in 1910 is located in Sugar Hill, an affluent African-American neighborhood in the West Adams district. As of September 2007, the 1/2 acre property is surrounded by a chain link fence and appears to be vacant. A curious trio of Roman soldiers/statesmen statues stand in a forlorn corner of a barren, grass-less lawn, creating a melancholy composition. It is hoped that this beautiful mansion will one day be rescued from its current state.
  • 2182 Broadview Terrace, Carl Kay, Architect 1936
    Architect Carl Kay designed the Streamline Moderne style fourplex and three other similarly styled buildings surrounding Hollywood's 'High Tower' between 1935 and 1956. The four, one-bedroom units last sold in 2008 for $1,170,000. Located at 2182 Broadview Terrace in the Hollywood Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles.
  • 207 Goode Avenue Office Building, AECOM Architects 2009
    AECOM designed the 207 Goode Avenue Office Building in precast concrete and a glass curtainwall that helps animate the facade. Chevron-shaped columns support a port cochere, giving a lightness to the heavy structure. In the evening, the building glows with the light of lime green LED lighting; the thin lighting strips illuminating every nuance in the pattern of the facade.

    Located in Glendale, California at 207 Goode Avenue.
  • 207 Goode Avenue Office Building, AECOM Architects 2009
    The port cochere, with the Chevron-shaped supports provide a lightness to the heavy structure.
  • 206 N. Grand Avenue, Pasadena c.1887
    Originally situated across the street at 235 N. Grand Avenue, the site of the James A. Culbertson House. Designed in the Queen Anne Style with an original carriage house in the rear.
  • 203 Columbia Street, G. Lawrence Stimson, Architect 1908
    The Craftsman style house was designed by noted architect G. Lawrence Stimson in 1908. A c.1910 article in the Pasadena Star in describing the house referred to it as 'without exception one of the most attractive and unique homes yet constructed by the Stimson Company.'

    The architect also designed the William Wrigley Mansion 'Tournament House' c.1906-1914, home of the Pasadena Tournament of Roses.
  • 1961 De Mille Drive, Tony Ngai 1983
    Postmodern style house designed by Hawaii-based architect Tony Ngai in 1983. The interior has a three-story living room with a cantilevered bridge connecting the east and west rooms on the upper floor in a dramatic split level arrangement.

    The architect designed his first house for his own family in Yokohama when he was only 13 years old. His projects range in size from a 1800 s.f. residence on Canyon Oak in the Los Feliz Oaks to a custom residence of over 18,000 s.f. in Hillsborough, California. His commissions range from ocean front residences in the Bahamas, Mediterranean villas on the Gulf Coast of Florida, contemporary Japanese influenced estates in the hills south of San Francisco and in Kahala, to luxury hilltop contemporary residences overlooking Diamond Head and the ocean in Hawaii.

    Located at 1961 De Mille Drrive in the Laughlin Park neighborhood within the Los Feliz district of Los Angeles, California.

  • 1847 North Curson Avenue, Josef Van der Kar, Architect 1960
    I immediatley recognized the mid-century genius of the house even partially hidden behind a weathered fence, when I first saw it this afternoon while hiking around the neighborhood with my camera in hand. I wasn't all surprised to learn it was the work of architect Josef Van der Kar. The architect, who passed away in 2002 aged 94, was friends with other non-conformists of the period, including architectural photographer Julius Schulman, landscape designer Garrett Eckbo, and fellow 'radical' architect Gregory Ain. He was a card-carrying Communist whose political activism made him a target of the House Un-American Activities Committee.

    Located at 1847 North Curson Avenue in the Sunset Hills above Hollywood Boulevard, Los Angeles, California.
  • 1720 Chevy Chase Drive, Wallace E. Neff 1924
    Prolific architect Wallace Neff designed the Spanish Colonial Revival style residence in 1924.
  • 1441-1443 1/2 Carroll Avenue
    Declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in 1978 (No. 191), this stately Queen Anne Victorian has a storied past. Built as a residence for James S. Luckenbach in 1887, it was sold to Kaspare Cohn, the founder of Union Bank in 1902, who established the property as Kapare Cohn Hospital the forerunner of Cedars of Lebanon Hospital (now Cedars-Sinai).
  • 1411 N. Central Avenue- Architect Unknown
    A handsome Mediterranean 'castle' located on the southwest corner of Spencer Street and Central Avenue in Glendale, CA. A band of Spanish tile frames the entryway and wraps around the tower.
  • 1411 Carroll Avenue, Residence and Carriage House
    Built in 1885 with both Queen Anne and Eastlake influences, this magnificent home was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in 1978 (No. 190). It is noted for its beautiful interior plaster and woodwork.
  • 1407 Carroll Avenue, Joseph Cather Newsom, Architect
    Declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in 1978 (No. 189). Constructed in 1885 in the 'El Capitan' design by Architect Joseph Cather Newsom.
  • 1401 Carroll Avenue
    Built in 1912 in the Swiss Craftsman Style, this magnificent property is located on the northwest corner of Carroll Avenue and Douglas Street and beautifully compliments the other 'painted ladies' in the area.
  • 1355 Carroll Avenue
    The Angelino Heights section of Echo Park contains some of the best preserved Victorian era homes in Los Angeles. Built in 1887 for capitalist Henry L. Pinney, this house which stands on the northeast corner of Carroll
    Avenue and Douglas, is a fine example of the Eastlake style. In 1971, it was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument (No. 75) in the City of Los Angeles.
  • 1354 Carroll Avenue
    Built in the Craftsman/Bungalow Style that emerged between 1900 and 1920, this fourplex built in 1912 on the southeast corner of Carroll Avenue and Douglas Street is well-preserved and beautifully maintained.
  • 1347 Kellam Avenue
    Elegant Queen Anne Victorian built in about 1887 and situated at the southeast corner of Douglas and Kellam Avenue. The home has a 'twin' next door at 1343 Kellam Avenue. The home was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles in 1979 (no. 221).
  • 1345 Carroll Avenue
    Built in 1887 for Michael Sanders who operated a storage warehouse. The red brick foundaton is often seen in Queen Anne Style houses of the era. It was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in 1971 (No. 74). Thankfully, it appears to be undergoing extensive renovation (2005).
  • 1344 Carroll Avenue
    Described as a 'Gay Nineties' house, this fanciful work of Victorian art with its spindle-and-scroll ornamentation typifies the best of the era. Buit in about 1895 and declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1971 (No. 79)
  • 1343 Kellam Avenue
    Built in about 1887, this fine old Queen Anne is nearly identical to its next door neighbor at 1347 Kellam. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1979 (No. 220), it is our hope that it will one day be restored.
  • 1330 Carroll Avenue, Joseph Cather Newsom, Architect
    Built circa 1880 for dairyman Charles Sessions, this twelve room Victorian mansion is noted for its fanciful facade and grand presence. It was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in 1967 (No. 52)
  • 1329 Carroll Avenue
    Built in 1887 for Daniel Innes, who represented the area on the Los Angeles City Council. The Innes family occupied this home until approximately 1917. Built in the Eastlake style, the home was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in the City of Los Angeles in 1971 (No. 73)
  • 1324 Carroll Avenue
    An excellent example of the Queen Anne style cottage, typical of the 'plan book' houses. Built in 1880 and declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1971 (No. 78)
  • 1321 Carroll Avenue
    Built circa 1880, this residence originally was located at 1145 Court Street. It is noted for the unusual isometric arrangement of the windows and roofline. Victoriana sources claim the style is almost 'purely Eastlake, although it shows signs of Stick style.' Declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in 1977 (No. 176).
  • 1320 Carroll Avenue
    Built in 1888, this Queen Anne has all the trademark flourishes of the grand houses of the era. Established as a Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles in 1971 (No. 77).
  • 1316 Carroll Avenue
    Noted for the brackets and shell motif below the windows and over the porch steps, this Eastlake Victorian was built in 1880. Declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in 1971 (No. 76).
  • 1300 Carroll Avenue
    Built by Aaron P. Phillips in about 1880, 1300 Carroll Avenue combines both Queen Anne and Eastlake Victorian styles. The property has been beautifully restored and maintained, and is one of the finest 'painted ladies' to be found in Los Angeles. The home was declared a Historic-Cultural Monument by the City of Los Angeles in 1967 (Number 51).
  • 1210 Coldwater Canon Drive, Gruen & Krummeck 1950
    In the 1940s Victor Gruen and partner Elsie Krummeck were at the vanguard of commercial architecture, designing radical storefronts nationwide.Together, they created the concept of the regional shopping mall, which had a strong influence on urban landscapes worldwide. Gruen was born in Vienna, Austria, in 1903, where he studied architecture at the Academy of Fine Arts. In 1933, he opened his first architectural office designing modern commercial architecture which earned positive recognition in professional circles. As a Jew and Social Democrat, he was forced to leave Austria after the Nazis annexed the country in 1938, settling in New York where he formed a partnership with Elsie Krummeck whom he later married. The couple also produced two Broadway plays with the Viennese Theater Group, organized with other émigrés during their life together in New York. They moved to Los Angeles in 1940 under the sponsorship of department store magnate Joseph Magnin in order to complete several large projects for the chain. Their marriage and partnership was dissolved in the 1950s.

  • 1188 Coldwater Canon Drive, William J. Gage 1937
    Southern Colonial style residence designed by architect William J. Gage in 1937. The Beverly Hills-based architect began his career in partnership with Harry G. Koerner, with whom he designed the iconic Beverly Hills City Hall in 1932. After Koerner died of a sudden heart attack on February 27, 1935, just 14 hours after being the Guest of Honor at a dinner at the Victor Hugo Cafe, Gage continued the practice for a number of years, eventually retiring and passing away on September 28, 1965 at the age of 74.
  • 1157 West 55th Street, Fred E. Edmison, Architect, 1913
    A fine example of the Craftsman Style, with Oriental influences. Declared a Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument in 1991 (No. 510).
  • 1133 Glen Oaks Blvd. Leslie Arthur, Architect 1951








    I have passed by this interesting house a couple of times and wondered: What is it? From the street it has the look of a Jules Verne fantasy ark somehow marooned on a mountaintop. The only information I could find on the property was provided by a search of the MLS, which showed photos of a completely different looking house. The mystery continues....
  • 1114 Rossmoyne Avenue Architect Unknown 1923
    In a neighborhood of beautiful homes, this English Tudor Revival home built in 1923 with its sprawling front lawn and rose garden really stands out. The home was listed in the Glendale Register of Historic Places in 2005 (No. 53).
  • 1110 East Mountain Street, Glendale 1927
    When my family moved to Glendale from Portland, Oregon in 1957, my dad purchased a modest English Revival home on Everett Street in the prestigous Rossmoyne neigborhood. In my youth, I used to marvel at the big homes on Mountain Street and Rossmoyne Avenue just a few blocks away. This grand Mediterranean estate built in 1927 has always been one of my favorites.
  • 1101 Douglas Street
    Declared a Historic-Cultural Monument in 1979 (No. 217). This remarkable Queen Anne residence with Colonial Revival touches was built for Moses Langley Wicks, an insurance man from Missouri.
  • 1036-38 S. Bonnie Brae Street c.1898
    The South Bonnie Brae Tract Historic District is a historic district of Victorian houses in Los Angeles, California, between the 1000 block of South Bonnie Brae Street and the 1800 block of West Eleventh Street, in the Pico Union Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ) section of the city of Los Angeles.. The homes in the district date from the 1890s and reflect Queen Anne and Colonial Revival architecture. Based on its well-preserved period architecture, the district was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. The French Chateauesque style house with its corner turrets and second level balcony are most unusual for the area.
  • 103 Winnett Place, Daly Genik 2009
    The architectural firm Daly Genik completed the remodel of an existing 2000 sq. ft. single story house in 2009. The project was undertaken for an extended family to add space for a live in mother and office space for both parents. The architect added square footage by adding a steel structure which was 'slipped inside' the existing wood-frame house, enabling the possibility of a second story and roof garden. The garage on the left has been planted with a green roof functioning as an herb and vegetable garden.

    Located at 103 Winnett Place in Santa Monica, California.
  • 1026 S. Bonnie Brae Street c.1897
    The South Bonnie Brae Tract Historic District is a historic district of Victorian houses in Los Angeles, California, between the 1000 block of South Bonnie Brae Street and the 1800 block of West Eleventh Street, in the Pico Union Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ) section of the city of Los Angeles.. The homes in the district date from the 1890s and reflect Queen Anne and Colonial Revival architecture. Based on its well-preserved period architecture, the district was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1988. The house located at 1026 S. Bonnie Brae mixes the two predominant styles into a cohesive statement.
  • 1011 S. Madison Avenue, Sylvanus Marston 1910
    Architect Sylvanus Marston designed the West Coast Prairie style residence in 1910. Declared a Pasadena Historic Landmark in 1998.
  • 'Mills View' Milton S. Monroe House, attributed to Joseph Cather Newsom c.1887
    Queen Anne Victorian with mansard tower, designated City of Monrovia Historic Landmark No. 2. Located at 329 N. Melrose Avenue.
  • Haldeman House c.1917
    Originally the family home of Harry Marston Haldeman, Co-Founder of the Better American Federation of California and the The Oz Film Manufacturing Company. He produced four early silent films in 1914, including three of the earliest versions of the Wizard of Oz series. He was a close friend of L. Frank Baum and Co-Founder of 'Uplifters Club' at the Los Angeles Athletic Club and later Santa Monica Canyon. He was the grandfather of H. R. Haldeman; White House Chief of Staff to President Richard Nixon best known for his role in the Watergate scandal.

    Located at 1732 N. Wilton Place in Los Angeles, California.
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